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7

This is a mindfulness technique rather than a product, but when riding on flat pedals I consciously focus on keeping the balls of my feet over the pedal spindles. (I also resist the temptation, every time I see someone pushing flat pedals with their heels, to yell out "You're doing it wrong!")


5

Shimano make several models of pedals with SPD one side, and flat on the other. So they can be used with SPD shoes or normal shoes. Options include: PD-A530 These are designed for road/touring bikes, so are fairly slim, with a small metal platform. (Not to be confused with the PD-A520, which are one-sided SPD pedals, without a flat platform). Personally ...


5

According to French wikipedia, automatic pedals seem to be clipless pedals. A wide range of manufacturers make waterproof shoe covers (also known as overshoes or booties), for use with both clipless pedal systems as well as your usual set of sneakers (be sure to check out the particular model to see if they're compatible. One designed solely for clipless ...


5

For a ready made part, see Fly Pedals. This is essentially just a metal platform, which you bolt cleats onto, then clip them into your pedals. They are threaded with holes for 2-bolt or 3-bolt cleats, so should work with most mountain bike or road bike clipless pedals (including SPD-SL). Note these are not yet available, but you can pre-order them from the ...


4

I've had a similar question in mind for a while. I have yet to try this, but my thought is to install new cleats, then fill the bolt holes with shoe-goo or something similar to prevent the issue. It's pretty soft, so you may have to re-apply often, but it would be easier than removing destroyed bolts! I am going to try this next time I install new cleats!


4

Five Ten Freerider VXi Elements - 398 gram Five Ten Freerider - 399 gram Giro Jacket - 416 gram Shimano AM41 - 420 gram Teva Links - 440 gram 661 Filter - 680 Gram So basically, all the available (excluding high-top shoes) flat pedal shoes weigh the same. You could theoretically shave 1 gram by switching to the Freerider VXi Elements, but that would ...


4

If odor is your main concern, I can highly recommend the so-called boot bananas. You put them in your shoes whenever you are not using them, and it slowly kills all odors. I have a pair of boot-bananas for a year now, and I am very enthousiastic about it, all odors are gone since I use them. It did not use them for my cycling shoes though (they don't smell ...


4

I try to not wash cycle shoes. I have found a boot/shoe dryer to be effective with odor. The old style without a fan seems to work better for shoes. Leave the dryer in for a day and cook that bacteria. No I don't have medical information the dryer gets hot enough to kill bacteria but it seems to work. It gets rid of the odor and the next time they ...


4

Soaking them in a bucket of very diluted bleach water (~1 cap in a 5 gallon bucket) overnight should help with the odor. As far as drying, either grab a fan, or there are a lot of commercial solutions available. They're mostly marketed for winter/ski boots, but they'll obviously work for any type of wet shoe.


4

I ride flats for everything: city, XC, DH, DJ. Depending on what you want to do you can move your feet appropriately. I find that for XC and commuting types of riding moving my feet back so the balls of my feet are slightly forward of the axle/spindle gives me the best power transfer. If I want more stability I move my feet forward so the arch of my foot is ...


3

If you don't find any factory made component, you can always get down the do-it-yourself route. Here is a link to set of instructions on how to make ones for Shimano PD 520/540: http://www.instructables.com/id/Pedal-platforms-for-Shimano-PD-520540/ The basic idea of it is to get hold of an extra pair of cleats, affix them with appropriate bolts to a ...


3

Simple, yet powerful solution - pour max 1 teaspoon of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda, found in any store) into the shoes before or after wearing them. It will kill the bacteria and any other "stuff" that produces bad smell. It has no negative effects on skin whatsoever, except when applying it to freshly shaven skin - as it may cause inflammation of the ...


3

I rode a couple winters as a bike messenger in the northeastern US, and this is a classic messenger trick for the worst cold wet days. While your feet may still become somewhat wet, at least they will be warm and wet. I liked wearing a thin sock on the inside, the plastic bag, another pair of socks, then shoes. This is not really a dry-day technique. Then, ...


3

Try a pipe nipple extractor or similar stripped screw extractor (Example: http://www.plumbingsupply.com/extractors.html). It is designed to grip the inside sides of a pipe using the same turning direction that will unscrew it. It shouldn't need much depth to work and it will try to drill itself in. You may still have to drill some of the junk out, but go ...


2

Yes, it is possible with a suitable adapter. eg the Shimano SM-SH85, or the Crank Brothers 3-hole cleat adapter. These bolt onto 3 hole (road) shoes, and provide 2 holes to bolt on SPD cleats or similar. The main disadvantage is the thickness of the adapter. This will make the cleat stick out further from the shoe, so it will be closer to the ground. If ...


2

PIN PEDALS When I abandoned my SPD pedals after breaking my ankle, I had the same problem you faced, my feet slid around on the pedals and I could not keep my feet positioned. As others have mentioned, practice helps and your placement will improve as you consciously work on it about it. Then I recently discovered flat 'pin' pedals and now my feet stay ...


2

James Wilson, who provides mountain bike specific strength training coaching, has made a blog post and video describing how to get a good foot placement on a flat pedal. He has already explained it well, so it's best just to quote him: 3) Foot Placement: The first thing that you will notice on flat pedals is that your feet naturally go to a mid-foot ...


2

There likely isn't much difference in performance. Some people do find that SPD cleats lead to "hot spots" (painful spots) on the balls of the feet; that's why I went to SPD-SLs. You might find a difference in platform height; IIRC the height of the SPD cleats + pedals is shorter than the SPD-SL. You'd want to adjust your seat height to deal with that.


2

Don't change the shoes, change the pedal. A hybrid pedal would satisfy both needs. It features a clip and a flat "normal shoes" side. Because for commuting sport-like conditions are probably not so important. http://bike.shimano.com/publish/content/global_cycle/en/us/index/products/pedals/mountain/product.-code-PD-A530.-type-.pd_mountain.html greets Josef


2

I have used this technique in emergencies while hiking, but never thought of deliberately using it day-to-day. When the weather unexpectedly turns foul (and this is before I had the money to buy quality waterproof hiking shoes), my feet would soak. So I would takeout a thick plastic bag from the backpack. Put dry socks on. Put the plastic bag over them, ...


2

To fix your existing shoes, I would either move where the strap attaches to the "tongue" of the shoe or where the buckle is fixed to the side of the shoe. The straps are designed to be replaceable ( as well as the buckles ). I would take a closer look at your shoes, many Shimano models have small screws that fasten the buckle to the shoe so it can be ...


1

Another vote for the PD-A530. In my case I have these on the hybrid and PD-A520's on the Cannondale road bike. Both pairs are adjusted so that they feel the same so the muscle memory on both bikes is the same. In a panic stop, I don't want to have to remember which bike I am on to get out of it. Tom


1

Perhaps the shoes are the right length, but too wide for your feet. You could wear extra socks so you wouldn't have to tighten them so much, but that would probably make them too warm. Maybe an extra insole would make them a little tighter without making them much warmer, as there isn't much airflow through the sole anyway.


1

One word: Sugru. It's a great self-curing plastic that allows you to "hack" your shoes in all sorts of ways. You can knead in a bit of it to make sure the tightest buckle position is blocked. You can use it to add a lip to the release to make it easier to grab. You can use it to repair your shoes. Next to ShoeGoo and gaffer's tape, it's the Best Thing in ...


1

For dry feet I have been using Taiga Dry-foot gaiters for years now. They are about $50 US. I just replaced the pair I had been abusing for about three years. They cover the shoe but are open at the bottom so whether you clip in or not you are in business. Wash them as you would any Gore-Tex product, that is with the special detergent. They don't need ...


1

Check out Chrome Industries, they make a lot of commuter apparel and have a whole line of clip and non-clip shoes. I'm not sure how dressy you need, but these might work for you. Plus if you ever decided to go with clipless pedals you'll have shoes!


1

I've got the regular Freeride shoes and love how sticky they are. Haven't tried the new VXi ones, but I think the spot with no tread pattern would be a little nicer since you don't have to lift your foot to reposition. I'd recommend reading Pinkbike's review as they cover most of the relevant points.


1

I tried with bathroom sealant (supposed to be white, but dried clear/grey). After a couple of months cycling in all weathers it's still in there. Seems like a cheap and easy solution. Shown below in the right hex-bolt only. I'll now be adding this to the other bolts too. (Some credit should go to Darren Cope who suggested something very similar).


1

I've used the edge of a blunt'ish steak knife in the past and it has worked a treat. The tip fits perfectly down inside the bolt, pick out dirt and grit then return to cutlery draw for future use!


1

I have 4E feet and the only shoes that I have found that fit are Lake



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