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9

if I wear the same clothes and just go for a walk/jog, then my feet stay dry for much longer Do you have mudguards (fenders) on your bike? If not your feet are in the spray from the front wheel and will get wet unless you wear over-boots. Or gumboots. For cycling when the roads are wet mudguards make a huge different to your comfort. You'll stay dryer ...


8

Assuming that you're talking about cleats on your shoes, there are three main attachment systems. Left: 2-bolt, Middle: 2 or 3 bolt, Right: 3 bolt. Notice how the one on the left has a chunkier sole. The two-bolt option is used for SPD which are popular with MTB, commuting and touring cyclists. I use 2-bolt SPD shoes on my audax bike because I'm able to ...


7

The main thing that would determine whether or not a particular brand or style of shoe cover will help would be the closure around your ankle, above the top of the shoe. A standard, non-cycling over-shoe or shoe cover like those made by Totes and other manufacturers will usually cover most of the shoe, but the opening is wide and water will run down your ...


5

The vast majority of cycling shoes (road and mountain) are well ventilated and not suitable for cold weather riding. Lake makes an excellent winter boot (I have several pairs). 45NRTH makes the Wolvhammer, which I haven't tried, but have heard good things about. There isn't a market for cold weather "road" shoes since generally road bikes become ...


5

Yes there are lots of different options with pedals (it's a bit easier with shoes), but they can be summarised quite briefly. Types of pedals: Flat - a standard pedal on many bikes Flat pedal with toe clips. So you can still use any shoe, but the toe clip holds your shoe in place on the pedal. "Clipless" pedals - where both pedal and shoe have a some kind ...


4

A lot of riders appear to prefer SPD's, which is a great, and can work well (as indicated by the answers here). For interest sake here are some arguments for "road pedals" which are typically the three bolt variety. Pros - Road Pedals (SPD-SL and others) Road bike specific pedals (e.g., Shimano SPD-SL) are designed for a single purpose, road cycling, and ...


4

Back when I did winter riding in Minnesota (in temps down to 0F), I used neoprene booties over my regular cycling shoes. These kept the feet warm and also kept out moisture. At the time I was using regular "toe clip" pedals, so no shoe cleats, but reputedly one could use the things with cleats by cutting out the bottom around the cleat (though obviously ...


3

Unless you plan to do a lot of sprinting up muddy hills to jump barriers, the studs are just extra weight that makes annoying noises when you're walking around. SPD is great for touring since you can easily walk around in the shoes, the studs detract from that without adding much benefit. You can get small "set screws" to fill the holes where the studs ...


2

For flat pedals, here's my suggested preference order of shoe type: A skateboarding shoe. They have flat grippy soles with more stiffness than most shoes. A traditional bicycling shoe (intended for use with clips and straps). A shoe made for any indoor sport. Indoor soccer shoes (like John Zwinck linked to in a comment), basketball shoes, etc. These will ...


2

Usually shoes for walking/running and cycling shoes are constructed quite differently: shoes you walk on are usually far less rigid, most have a much softer sole to absorb shocks/bumps, and of course do not have cleats. As this is ergonomics and people are quite different, there is probably no general answer: I find walking in SPD Trecking shoes ...


2

If the shoes seem a little too big, try some insoles. Start with the inexpensive ones you can find in a drugstore for $10. That will keep your foot from moving around inside the shoe without having to tighten the straps/laces so much. And maybe the extra cushion provided by the insoles will make the shoes feel a little more comfortable.


2

I did find these http://www.yellowjersey.org/tocleat.html And Yellow Jersey is exactly the kind of shop you'd expect to find that stuff. The one in the image is for Road shoes, but I think could easily be adapted to SPD shoes with some work with a dremel tool. They say they will make a custom cleat for just about any shoe. You do realize that ...


2

Streuth, you are right! I just tried tightening my Shimano SR215s and now I can't get my shoes off! I thought you must have very thin feet, but I do not and this position is not all that tight. I have never tightened them up this much before simply because the ratchet straps are old and difficult to tighten. When I get some replacement straps, this is going ...


2

I used to ride in almost exactly the same gear as you (gym shorts rather than casual shorts), so I know where you're coming from. The mudguards (US: fenders) help a little, but not if it's actually raining while you're riding, as you basically ride into the rain drops. It's not the shorts, cycling tights/running leggings will do the same. Even waterproof ...


2

To start, Keen makes a commuter bike sandal that is clipless, so you may look into that if you like the fit of Keens. I know that Specialized makes wide sizes in their shoes as does Lake. There may be others out there, but that is what I am immediately familiar with. As far what to avoid, most of the European companies (especially the Italian companies ...


1

Although I personally wear overshoes and SPDs, the best you can really expect in a prolonged downpour is that water enters your shoes slowly enough your feet can warm it up - they'll still be wet eventually, but not cold. I suspect the best system for casual clothes is actually to stick a rain cape/poncho over the top - the cycling-specific ones are ...


1

Like you say, your feet get wettest from the rain running down your legs and into your shoes. The only way to stop this is a shoe cover system that seals at your ankle. I don't know of a commercially available system like this but if you are truly serious you could make something with bags and rubber bands. Suggestions about fenders are well and good but on ...


1

Even with platform pedals, a stiffer shoe will help. If you're riding in squishy running shoes, switching to a shoe that is stiffer with less cushion will improve your riding. Those all mountain flats would be fine, or even skate shoes. However, unless multi-day refers to a month or more, I would really encourage you to look into getting clipless pedals ...


1

I like downhill larger platform pedals with what is commonly referred to as street shoes. I don' like advertising a brand but an example is the best answer. All Mountain Flats You have people advising clipless (spd) and I don't agree. Ironically clipless means the ski boot type clip in. But I don't agree with spd. I would do a 500 mile multi day ride on ...


1

I would suggest removing them. Studs are only useful for steep hike a bike scenarios on loose dirt or clay (something that the spikes can bite). These were really intended for XC race situations, where some climbs are too steep to ride so you need to throw the XC bike on your shoulder and run like you stole it! In all the tours I have never done, ...


1

I feel your pain… One place that I've found that seems to stock large shoes is Bike Tires Direct. Both Shimano and Sidi seem to make models that go up to at least size 52. If you don't want to order from the US, you could still use their listings to find some candidates and then ask your LBS what they can order for you. The shoes will come in two styles ...


1

You probably do not know this but baking soda can act as a good deodorizer for the shoes and sometimes even for the feet. - After using your shoes, sprinkle a little bit of baking soda on each one. - Leave on the baking soda on the shoes overnight. - Take off the baking soda from the shoes in the morning especially if it is already going to be used. ...


1

Float, which is the degree to which one can rotate one's feet while clipped in, can sometimes be an issue. In other words, all clipless pedal systems-- so-called because they replace the toe clips with cleats of some kind-- restrict the amount that you can rotate your feet while clipped in (i.e., while the cleat is connected to the pedal). This was the ...


1

One thing people forget to mention is the use of a top of the line mtn shoe on your road bike. The advantages of mtn shoes are many, walking, not having multiple shoes , etc. If you are using say the S Works mtn shoe on your road bike, you would be hard pressed to notice any difference in performance over the road shoe. Most riders are not tour ...


1

Any shoes bought for winter (below freezing) cycling should be several sizes larger than a rider's normal shoe size. Stuffing more layers inside a shoe/boot that is a close fit actually makes keeping your feet warm harder since it will tend to restrict circulation. This is a very common mistake. I normally wear a size 44, but my winter sets of ...



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