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10

if I wear the same clothes and just go for a walk/jog, then my feet stay dry for much longer Do you have mudguards (fenders) on your bike? If not your feet are in the spray from the front wheel and will get wet unless you wear over-boots. Or gumboots. For cycling when the roads are wet mudguards make a huge different to your comfort. You'll stay dryer ...


8

The main thing that would determine whether or not a particular brand or style of shoe cover will help would be the closure around your ankle, above the top of the shoe. A standard, non-cycling over-shoe or shoe cover like those made by Totes and other manufacturers will usually cover most of the shoe, but the opening is wide and water will run down your ...


4

A lot of riders appear to prefer SPD's, which is a great, and can work well (as indicated by the answers here). For interest sake here are some arguments for "road pedals" which are typically the three bolt variety. Pros - Road Pedals (SPD-SL and others) Road bike specific pedals (e.g., Shimano SPD-SL) are designed for a single purpose, road cycling, and ...


3

I used to ride in almost exactly the same gear as you (gym shorts rather than casual shorts), so I know where you're coming from. The mudguards (US: fenders) help a little, but not if it's actually raining while you're riding, as you basically ride into the rain drops. It's not the shorts, cycling tights/running leggings will do the same. Even waterproof ...


3

For pure road-riding: Neoprene covers over normal road-shoes are the best as long as you don't have to put a foot down too often. The cleats are prone to clogging in snowy conditions. But then you wouldn't certainly get on a bike. On the other hand, ankle hugging covers keep the rain running down the legs into the shoe, which could happen with insulated ...


2

Streuth, you are right! I just tried tightening my Shimano SR215s and now I can't get my shoes off! I thought you must have very thin feet, but I do not and this position is not all that tight. I have never tightened them up this much before simply because the ratchet straps are old and difficult to tighten. When I get some replacement straps, this is going ...


2

If the shoes seem a little too big, try some insoles. Start with the inexpensive ones you can find in a drugstore for $10. That will keep your foot from moving around inside the shoe without having to tighten the straps/laces so much. And maybe the extra cushion provided by the insoles will make the shoes feel a little more comfortable.


2

I did find these http://www.yellowjersey.org/tocleat.html And Yellow Jersey is exactly the kind of shop you'd expect to find that stuff. The one in the image is for Road shoes, but I think could easily be adapted to SPD shoes with some work with a dremel tool. They say they will make a custom cleat for just about any shoe. You do realize that ...


2

Although I personally wear overshoes and SPDs, the best you can really expect in a prolonged downpour is that water enters your shoes slowly enough your feet can warm it up - they'll still be wet eventually, but not cold. I suspect the best system for casual clothes is actually to stick a rain cape/poncho over the top - the cycling-specific ones are ...


2

To start, Keen makes a commuter bike sandal that is clipless, so you may look into that if you like the fit of Keens. I know that Specialized makes wide sizes in their shoes as does Lake. There may be others out there, but that is what I am immediately familiar with. As far what to avoid, most of the European companies (especially the Italian companies ...


2

Hole positions for Keo and Delta are exactly the same. I've switched over 3 years ago and the shoes didn't cause any problem.Even Shimano cleats of the 3-hole type have exactly the same pattern for the holes. And with the adapter Speedplay cleats will fit too.


2

Usually shoes for walking/running and cycling shoes are constructed quite differently: shoes you walk on are usually far less rigid, most have a much softer sole to absorb shocks/bumps, and of course do not have cleats. As this is ergonomics and people are quite different, there is probably no general answer: I find walking in SPD Trecking shoes ...


1

I've got heaps of torx bits from various old sets. One way is to hammer in an oversized torx bit so that the six points bind up into the six corners, then undo with a lot of inward force and a lot of leverage. For me that's holding it in a vice and using a long-arm socket ratchet while pushing down. Expect the torx bit to be sacrificial, they tend to ...


1

To me, it's not an either / or choice. I would be aiming to get both, over the longer term. When planning to ride consistently through the winter there are also other considerations, some that help keep your feet drier and warmer (you may already be doing some or all) The first thing is fit mud guards / fenders, or have a winter bike. Mud guards greatly ...


1

Like you say, your feet get wettest from the rain running down your legs and into your shoes. The only way to stop this is a shoe cover system that seals at your ankle. I don't know of a commercially available system like this but if you are truly serious you could make something with bags and rubber bands. Suggestions about fenders are well and good but on ...


1

I feel your pain… One place that I've found that seems to stock large shoes is Bike Tires Direct. Both Shimano and Sidi seem to make models that go up to at least size 52. If you don't want to order from the US, you could still use their listings to find some candidates and then ask your LBS what they can order for you. The shoes will come in two styles ...


1

Float, which is the degree to which one can rotate one's feet while clipped in, can sometimes be an issue. In other words, all clipless pedal systems-- so-called because they replace the toe clips with cleats of some kind-- restrict the amount that you can rotate your feet while clipped in (i.e., while the cleat is connected to the pedal). This was the ...


1

One thing people forget to mention is the use of a top of the line mtn shoe on your road bike. The advantages of mtn shoes are many, walking, not having multiple shoes , etc. If you are using say the S Works mtn shoe on your road bike, you would be hard pressed to notice any difference in performance over the road shoe. Most riders are not tour ...


1

You probably do not know this but baking soda can act as a good deodorizer for the shoes and sometimes even for the feet. - After using your shoes, sprinkle a little bit of baking soda on each one. - Leave on the baking soda on the shoes overnight. - Take off the baking soda from the shoes in the morning especially if it is already going to be used. ...



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