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17

It's a Shimano SPD cleat. There are a few different models, but they are all cross compatible. You can reuse the old ones if you can unscrew it, but new pair should be under 20€, too. EDIT: Looks like this is an old Shimano cleat, like this one: http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/reviews/dzr/ovis/10.jpg. Modern ones and most copies have a sharp angled "...


10

if I wear the same clothes and just go for a walk/jog, then my feet stay dry for much longer Do you have mudguards (fenders) on your bike? If not your feet are in the spray from the front wheel and will get wet unless you wear over-boots. Or gumboots. For cycling when the roads are wet mudguards make a huge different to your comfort. You'll stay dryer ...


8

The main thing that would determine whether or not a particular brand or style of shoe cover will help would be the closure around your ankle, above the top of the shoe. A standard, non-cycling over-shoe or shoe cover like those made by Totes and other manufacturers will usually cover most of the shoe, but the opening is wide and water will run down your ...


6

Bilateral asymmetry in pedaling is well-known and long-studied. You can see the abstract of a review of what is known about bilateral asymmetry in running and cycling here. During cycling, bilateral pedaling asymmetry is common, and not fixed at a particular split: it varies with cadence, power, duration, and your ride goals. Another article that is highly ...


3

The short answer is no. The SPD-SL 3 bolt pattern is larger by several centimeters. An SPD shoe has tread to make it easier to walk in the show off-road and a smaller, 2 bolt cleat mounting pattern. The tread would be in the way of mounting the SPD-SL cleat.


3

I used to ride in almost exactly the same gear as you (gym shorts rather than casual shorts), so I know where you're coming from. The mudguards (US: fenders) help a little, but not if it's actually raining while you're riding, as you basically ride into the rain drops. It's not the shorts, cycling tights/running leggings will do the same. Even waterproof ...


3

For pure road-riding: Neoprene covers over normal road-shoes are the best as long as you don't have to put a foot down too often. The cleats are prone to clogging in snowy conditions. But then you wouldn't certainly get on a bike. On the other hand, ankle hugging covers keep the rain running down the legs into the shoe, which could happen with insulated ...


2

Although I personally wear overshoes and SPDs, the best you can really expect in a prolonged downpour is that water enters your shoes slowly enough your feet can warm it up - they'll still be wet eventually, but not cold. I suspect the best system for casual clothes is actually to stick a rain cape/poncho over the top - the cycling-specific ones are ...


2

Hole positions for Keo and Delta are exactly the same. I've switched over 3 years ago and the shoes didn't cause any problem.Even Shimano cleats of the 3-hole type have exactly the same pattern for the holes. And with the adapter Speedplay cleats will fit too.


2

To start, Keen makes a commuter bike sandal that is clipless, so you may look into that if you like the fit of Keens. I know that Specialized makes wide sizes in their shoes as does Lake. There may be others out there, but that is what I am immediately familiar with. As far what to avoid, most of the European companies (especially the Italian companies ...


2

After many years of riding in foul weather, I rarely use overshoes for above freezing temperatures. They are NEVER waterproof. The opening for your cleat and heel allows water into the setup which inevitably makes it's way up to your ventilated upper. For them to actually be waterproof, they would need to seal to the bottom sole of your shoe. ...


1

Everyone will agree that it is best to have shoes that fit properly. If the shoes don't fit perfectly, it's better to have shoes that are a bit too big, rather than shoes that are a bit too small. As we warm up our feet swell slightly, and if the shoes are too small then the blood circulation can be restricted. That can lead to cramps or numbness. The ...


1

To me, it's not an either / or choice. I would be aiming to get both, over the longer term. When planning to ride consistently through the winter there are also other considerations, some that help keep your feet drier and warmer (you may already be doing some or all) The first thing is fit mud guards / fenders, or have a winter bike. Mud guards greatly ...


1

Like you say, your feet get wettest from the rain running down your legs and into your shoes. The only way to stop this is a shoe cover system that seals at your ankle. I don't know of a commercially available system like this but if you are truly serious you could make something with bags and rubber bands. Suggestions about fenders are well and good but on ...


1

I feel your pain… One place that I've found that seems to stock large shoes is Bike Tires Direct. Both Shimano and Sidi seem to make models that go up to at least size 52. If you don't want to order from the US, you could still use their listings to find some candidates and then ask your LBS what they can order for you. The shoes will come in two styles "...


1

I've got heaps of torx bits from various old sets. One way is to hammer in an oversized torx bit so that the six points bind up into the six corners, then undo with a lot of inward force and a lot of leverage. For me that's holding it in a vice and using a long-arm socket ratchet while pushing down. Expect the torx bit to be sacrificial, they tend to ...


1

My limited* experience with Shimano SPD was that a drop of oil on the cleats can resolve the hard-to-get-out problem. (*) Only had them for a year quite a while back, didn't like the feel.



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