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1

If you're really that concerned, get a roll of 3M "copter tape" and cut it to the same size as the cleat. Given the cleat should never move, the most you should get is a bit of marking where the cleat sits which you'll never see as the cleat should never move (and it's helpful when you're replacing cleats)


1

It's almost certainly the shoes but exactly what is a really variable question. New shoe problems tend to fit into the following: 1, Does the shoe fit properly (length and width)? Seems the answer is no as you got a size too big which means your foot will move a bit. This can be mitigated with the correct insole and you can even get mouldable ones which you ...


1

Cleat covers are fine but there's no reason why a pair of road cleats with the rubber anti-slip bumpers still in place would scratch slate. If you're using MTB SPD cleats then definitely they'll damage floors. To be totally honest, if I'm concerned (for example one cafe has steep stairs to the bathroom) I tend to just take the shoes off. If the cafe is a ...


1

If you're using SPD-SL, cleat covers or insertable seem to be the only "nice" ways to go. [I use Look, so I'm in a similar boat.] However, if you switch to SPD (which requires different pedals), there are plenty of shoes (and sandals) which have recessed cleats so you can walk around without damaging anything and wear all day without problems. And a lot of ...


2

I use some of these if I'm touring and want to travel light, I put them in my bag but I reckon they could slip in to a jersey pocket, I'll try after work today. I've used cleat covers before and, though they protect the cleat, didn't feel they were a proper solution - you still end up walking weirdly because the only contact point is the cleat.


2

My answer is going to be a non-answer in the sense that shoe sizes are not really the same even among most types of shoes. As an example, when I buy shoes, I normally buy (in US sizes) 12.5 wide /13 in New Balance (which feels fine), 13 in Nike (which feels fine or slightly tight), 13 in Adidas (which typically feel tight), something bigger for boots ...


1

Start by replacing the insoles. Typically this is what smells the most in old bike shoes. After that you can also clean the shoe itself following any one of the many suggested methods outlined in this thread. But be sure to remove you nice new insoles first before cleaning the shoe itself. Also try to thoroughly dry the shoe as fast as possible, leaving ...


1

Dettol Liquid contains Chloroxylenol. It kills bacteria and provides protection against germs which can cause infection and illness. Dettol kills 99.9% of bacteria, such as E.coli and Influenza virus (H1N1). Always read the label. Serious, the smell is caused by bacteria and your mission is to kill them! Put hot water, plenty of Dettol and your ...


0

This is a bit unconventional, but stay with me. Take the shoes and place them in a plastic bag. Remove as much air as you can from the bag and seal. Place the bagged shoes in to the freezer. Leave the shoes in the freezer at least overnight. I based this on the idea that the cold temps of the freezer would kill most of the odor causing bacteria and it ...


7

It is a machine used for heating the shoes so that they can be formed to your feet. the shoes are heated. You then put them on your feet and they use a vacuum bag around the shoe to compress it against your foot so it gets the proper shape. Here's an article that explains it. I've had something similar done for hockey skates, although without the vacuum, and ...



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