Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

Don't expect much until you know the guys that work at a bike shop. I bought my first road bike (a single speed) from my not-so-local LBS because it was on sale (45 miles from my house, with several bike shops in between). In the process, I discovered that I got along well with the guys that work there. In return for our growing relationship, they started ...


15

From someone who worked in retail for years: If you have to ask for a discount, you don't deserve one. Shops know what gear is worth and price it accordingly. Discounts are usually given to loyal customer (I'm talking years loyal) who the shop staff enjoy speaking to, dealing with and would like to keep them happy so they continue to shop there. ...


12

A lot will depend on the construction of the helmet. For example the basic material in the helmet will be some sort of sponge or foam which relies on its texture to absorb sudden impacts; does this degrade over time? For example, a loaf of bread gets its texture from the tiny air bubbles formed while rising and proving, but if left to prove too long, the ...


10

Make sure that the frame is not compromised. Looks for cracks or big dents, or any asymmetry in the forks. Make sure that there is no rust through the paint anywhere. If there is any chrome, make sure that any rust is only on the surface. Make sure that the seatpost isn't seized. This is pretty easy as you can just loosen the seatpost bolt and give the ...


10

I'm not sure about Austria, but here in the UK many general sports shops are no more than outlets for Nike and Adidas clothing. If you are someone who knows very little about bikes, I'd suggest that this would be riskier than going to a specialised bike shop. The only thing that would possibly make the general sports shop more attractive would be price. But ...


7

If you're buying from your LBS then I would think twice, yes they're making a profit on that shiny bike, but is a few quid/dollars/euros/pesos off the sticker worth endangering them? I frequent my LBS because the guys in there know me, they've sold me the last half dozen bikes I've bought, so when I come in, we chat, they fit my service and work in even ...


7

I would try to avoid rim brakes for a low-maintenance commuter bike, because they're not low maintenance. And they don't work very well in the rain. They're also not much cheaper than cheap disk brakes. It's not worth the price difference. In my experience the roller brakes are less effective than disks or drums. The roller brakes don't bite, they're very ...


6

Your local bike shop may not get it with fixed/single speed but do not discount them entirely. They can sometimes compete on price better than a mail order company simply because they will not be charging you shipping even if they have to get parts in specially for you. Most bike shops have at least a couple of regular suppliers and these suppliers will ...


6

eBay is a good tool for determining value, search for your item selecting closed auctions and you often get a list of your item, bike in this case that has already sold (or not). The price of those transactions helps me determine relative value. Likewise craigslist shows you another view of what people are asking. If your target bike is being listed for ...


5

I've worked retail at an LBS and at various other outdoor stores. Even if you come in politely and ask for a discount the fact is that the other 2 guys that did it that day were rude and pushy about it so it's unlikely that we're in any good mood at this point. We're happy to give discounts to the people that are nice bring donuts by, just come and talk in ...


5

From my experience, your best bet is to just build a very good relationship with your LBS. Once they know you well enough, they're likely to just make you a good offer to begin with. Note: This isn't advocating building the relationship for the discounts, but they are a nice side effect.


5

The Surly Pacer is a good choice. My first real bike was a one, and I used it for commuting, training rides, and a two-week tour in Europe. Even though it wasn't "ideal" for training rides or touring, it worked great for me until I was able to afford more specialized bikes. The Pacer doesn't come with as many rack bosses as you'll want (one advantage of the ...


5

Short answer: yes. Long answer: You might not find what you are looking for at a shop. I would seriously suggest checking online. Three reasons: There are hundreds of models/sizes/configurations of bike parts. The part(s) that you are looking for will need to match the parts/bike you already have. The likelihood that your local bike shop has the exact ...


4

I agree with the other answers with regard to LBS. Many of them are doing their best to provide bicycle services and aren't making a mint doing it. It isn't a filthy-rich business and it doesn't make sense for most of them to sell used bikes. If THAT's what you'r looking for... If you are looking at a bike from a garage sale, Ebay or Craigslist seller, ...


4

I would definetly negotiate for a lower price. In these hard times it should be expected. That does not mean you are a "weasel" or a "thief"...Are you kidding me? Pay top dollar if you choose (car dealers must love you). A company needs to earn my business. That said I do my research as others have mentioned above. Whilst shopping for a bike I would ...


4

While not 100% on topic, if you are in southern Ontario, consider the Toronto International Bike Show every year around the first few weeks of March. (It usually conflicts with a half marathon in Burlington, Ontario, the Chili Half, so I often have done both!). Usually it is in the CNE grounds. They have a ton of local bike stores there trying to sell new ...


4

I go with how they treat me. Are they friendly? Do they try and push whatever they have in stock or seem to be more focused on what I actually need. On the technical side, do they sell your brand? Are they a roadie or mtb shop or a nice mix? Does their repair area seem to have work that is being done or is it empty? You can also question some of the ...


4

Join a cycling club. Most have sponsors and you'll get a full cycling costume (with advertisements) for free or almost free. I'm currently a member of 2 cycling clubs. My 2 summer & winter outfits (14 pieces of quality clothing total) costed me about € 250, and a some hours cycling with the club. One club will pay back € 100 as soon as I have completed ...


4

We all like a bargain. Rich people don't get rich by paying top-dollar for everything and poor people sometimes have their purchasing decisions limited to what is in the bargain-bin. Whether rich or poor a lot of time can be spent hunting out bargains, however, all bargains are just another ploy to get some money from someone's pocket. Hence, rather than ...


4

I don't think that the exact laces are available under the Shimano brand, but the internet may prove me wrong. The closest thing I have found online is oval athletic laces like these here. When I replaced mine I found similar laces at a sporting goods store, but I've seen similar sport laces at some of the big box stores as well.


4

Five Ten Freerider VXi Elements - 398 gram Five Ten Freerider - 399 gram Giro Jacket - 416 gram Shimano AM41 - 420 gram Teva Links - 440 gram 661 Filter - 680 Gram So basically, all the available (excluding high-top shoes) flat pedal shoes weigh the same. You could theoretically shave 1 gram by switching to the Freerider VXi Elements, but that would ...


4

I concur with PeteH's answer, with the caveat that local bike cultures, and certainly individual bike shops, can sometimes skew heavily in the direction of a specific kind of riding or a specific kind of rider... who may not be you. So it's completely fine to walk out of a local bike shop that treats you like something you'd scrape off the bottom of your ...


4

I suggest that you go to your local bike shop and see if you can test ride a modern bike. As Daniel says $500 will not get you far. A test ride of a couple of bikes at different price points will help you decide. You may find that your "retro" bike is OK after all. Or maybe that it never did fit you properly. But a new bike could be 5kg lighter than what ...


3

The first place I look for 'unusual' parts is Loose Screws. They have Ultegra and Dura Ace bar end shifters available. My second source is Rivendell Bicycle Works - They have a couple of different options. Not sure what you consider a reasonable price, but $100 US seems to be the ballpark for new shifters. Finally - you can always try eBay for used parts, ...


3

I've replaced my original round Shimano laces with flat laces, I found at my local shoe repair shop. I explained them, I need them for sports and they gave me special weather resistant laces. They last longer as the original laces. The round laces I found, loosened the knot too fast. And also didn't last long enough. The flat laces keep the knot good, and ...


3

Here's how I did it: Ask a question or two here, to get a better understanding from people here of what I'm looking for before I go into the store Look on Google for a list of stores, and find a shortlist of 15 that are recommended as "The Best Bike Stores in MyCityName" on a blog (based on a survey, apparently; and that blog entry has 283 comments with ...


3

I'm answering the unasked question: "How do I find a hard-to-find bike?" Certainly this bike exists, but you may have to stick with your search for some time before finding it. (I sympathize with the situation. I take a 19" frame in mens, and most bikes are too large for me.) Mens' bikes often have a reach that's a bit too long, and handlebars that's a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible