Hot answers tagged

27

Don't expect much until you know the guys that work at a bike shop. I bought my first road bike (a single speed) from my not-so-local LBS because it was on sale (45 miles from my house, with several bike shops in between). In the process, I discovered that I got along well with the guys that work there. In return for our growing relationship, they started ...


21

From someone who worked in retail for years: If you have to ask for a discount, you don't deserve one. Shops know what gear is worth and price it accordingly. Discounts are usually given to loyal customer (I'm talking years loyal) who the shop staff enjoy speaking to, dealing with and would like to keep them happy so they continue to shop there. ...


15

A lot will depend on the construction of the helmet. For example the basic material in the helmet will be some sort of sponge or foam which relies on its texture to absorb sudden impacts; does this degrade over time? For example, a loaf of bread gets its texture from the tiny air bubbles formed while rising and proving, but if left to prove too long, the ...


14

Make sure that the frame is not compromised. Looks for cracks or big dents, or any asymmetry in the forks. Make sure that there is no rust through the paint anywhere. If there is any chrome, make sure that any rust is only on the surface. Make sure that the seatpost isn't seized. This is pretty easy as you can just loosen the seatpost bolt and give the ...


14

When shopping for BSO bikes, people are just looking for a recreational ride that is a once in while, which leads them to focus on the sticker price. Looking at a mountain bike they then get to thinking "Hey, I can ride this around town. I can take it off roading if I wanted too.", so more bang for their buck. They also tend to look at the other ...


12

It matters in many ways where you buy the bike from. If you're buying online, then the parts will most likely be the same, although you should be careful to read the specs. Some online (brick and mortar as well) shops will have overstock bikes from previous years and the parts will be different from the current model year. If you buy from a local bike ...


12

Prioritize more: Tires -- the bike must allow me to use the tires I want to use. I used to have a road bike that did not allow any tire wider than 25mm. Any bike that cannot use 35mm tires is useless to me. Some people are still under the illusion that narrow tires are fast, wide tires are slow; there is a bunch of research that indicates this is not ...


11

Many BSO's are styled like mountain bikes, probably because the mountain bike features tend to be appealing to people who don't know a lot about bicycles. Consumers buy these bicycles even though they will never use them on anything resembling a mountain trail. A thick frame, thick, knobby tires, and suspension make a bicycle look rugged. The appearance of ...


10

I'm not sure about Austria, but here in the UK many general sports shops are no more than outlets for Nike and Adidas clothing. If you are someone who knows very little about bikes, I'd suggest that this would be riskier than going to a specialised bike shop. The only thing that would possibly make the general sports shop more attractive would be price. But ...


10

The key is to know your intended use. Knowing what you don't want also helps. But also a bike has a wide variety of applications, like a car. Main (non BSO) adult bike types (people are always trying new ideas, or marketing approaches, so this is intended as an overview) Road (racing) bike. For those who want to ride as fast as possible (for them). The ...


9

If you're buying from your LBS then I would think twice, yes they're making a profit on that shiny bike, but is a few quid/dollars/euros/pesos off the sticker worth endangering them? I frequent my LBS because the guys in there know me, they've sold me the last half dozen bikes I've bought, so when I come in, we chat, they fit my service and work in even ...


9

We all like a bargain. Rich people don't get rich by paying top-dollar for everything and poor people sometimes have their purchasing decisions limited to what is in the bargain-bin. Whether rich or poor a lot of time can be spent hunting out bargains, however, all bargains are just another ploy to get some money from someone's pocket. Hence, rather than ...


9

eBay is a good tool for determining value, search for your item selecting closed auctions and you often get a list of your item, bike in this case that has already sold (or not). The price of those transactions helps me determine relative value. Likewise craigslist shows you another view of what people are asking. If your target bike is being listed for ...


9

Security cameras have a standard called "pixels per foot" (ppf). This means that at a certain distance, an object 1 foot across (about the size of a US license plate) will have a certain number of pixels. As the object moves further away, the number of pixels per foot decreases. As the object moves closer, the number of pixels per foot increases. This is ...


9

One difference that internal cables make is if you transport your bike by car or have to haul it around by hand. Because the cables are inside the frame, they are less likely to get pinched by the clamp on your car-mount (especially if you use a trunk mount that clamps the top-tube). This is also true for car/bus bike mounts that clamp the down tube. If ...


7

I've worked retail at an LBS and at various other outdoor stores. Even if you come in politely and ask for a discount the fact is that the other 2 guys that did it that day were rude and pushy about it so it's unlikely that we're in any good mood at this point. We're happy to give discounts to the people that are nice bring donuts by, just come and talk in ...


7

I would try to avoid rim brakes for a low-maintenance commuter bike, because they're not low maintenance. And they don't work very well in the rain. They're also not much cheaper than cheap disk brakes. It's not worth the price difference. In my experience the roller brakes are less effective than disks or drums. The roller brakes don't bite, they're very ...


6

I would definetly negotiate for a lower price. In these hard times it should be expected. That does not mean you are a "weasel" or a "thief"...Are you kidding me? Pay top dollar if you choose (car dealers must love you). A company needs to earn my business. That said I do my research as others have mentioned above. Whilst shopping for a bike I would ...


6

From my experience, your best bet is to just build a very good relationship with your LBS. Once they know you well enough, they're likely to just make you a good offer to begin with. Note: This isn't advocating building the relationship for the discounts, but they are a nice side effect.


6

There's http://www.bikeradar.com/ which is linked to 4 magazines: Cycling Plus, Mountain Biking UK, Procycling and What Mountain Bike. As a result it carries various bike and gear reviews from the magazines as well as some which are only online (I think). As all of the magazines are UK based the site obviously has a British bias.


6

Your local bike shop may not get it with fixed/single speed but do not discount them entirely. They can sometimes compete on price better than a mail order company simply because they will not be charging you shipping even if they have to get parts in specially for you. Most bike shops have at least a couple of regular suppliers and these suppliers will ...


6

Single speed bikes tend to be very low end bikes--aside from fixies, but those are a different animal altogether. As such, you almost certainly will want a multispeed bike. Don't get too focused on having a specific number of gears. Instead, focus on a bike that meets your needs. For commuting, you'll mainly be looking at commuter bikes and road bikes, ...


5

Nashbar has been my source for years. Several times a year they have big clearance sales and you can find excellent deals. They carry everything from high-end name-brand stuff to their own labeled products. I still have the original Nashbar jersey I bought maybe 20 years ago....


5

I go with how they treat me. Are they friendly? Do they try and push whatever they have in stock or seem to be more focused on what I actually need. On the technical side, do they sell your brand? Are they a roadie or mtb shop or a nice mix? Does their repair area seem to have work that is being done or is it empty? You can also question some of the ...


5

I agree with the other answers with regard to LBS. Many of them are doing their best to provide bicycle services and aren't making a mint doing it. It isn't a filthy-rich business and it doesn't make sense for most of them to sell used bikes. If THAT's what you'r looking for... If you are looking at a bike from a garage sale, Ebay or Craigslist seller, ...


5

The Surly Pacer is a good choice. My first real bike was a one, and I used it for commuting, training rides, and a two-week tour in Europe. Even though it wasn't "ideal" for training rides or touring, it worked great for me until I was able to afford more specialized bikes. The Pacer doesn't come with as many rack bosses as you'll want (one advantage of the ...


5

It's much easier to make a chunky looking frame cheaply than to make thin tubing cheaply. The heavier everything is supposed to be the less obvious it is that the BSO is not what it looks like. One key give-away is that the mountain bike is always marked "not suitable for off road use". Road bikes also have to use more expensive components, specifically ...


5

Next to the M and L, it lists 65"-70", and 68.5"-75". " is an abbreviation for inches. So at 5'8" (5 feet 8 inches), or 68 inches, the M is probably a better fit, but if the rider is still growing, you might get the large because it's so close. That said, it seems to be a very expensive bike to be buying without a test ride first, even more so when you are ...



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