New answers tagged

0

I think you are concerned with the 'rate of degradation'. I've designed sports helmets recently that use similar materials (EPS for example), but not for so long as to ascertain all aspects of durability. Your biggest concern would be loss in mechanical strength on photodegradation. The rate of change in the mechanical integrity of expanded polystyrene ...


0

External cables can reduce your options for mounting luggage (frame bags) and lock holders. If you can fit such bags it's often with extra fiddling. I've seen brake cables running up the seat tube on a step through. These make fitting a child seat bracket a little interesting.


1

I use two bicycles daily: one with all cables internal, including those on the handlebar and one where only top tube cable is inside, other cables are outside. While riding it makes zero difference. While cleaning the bicycle I find the internal routing handier, because the surface is featureless, thus easier to clean. When changing the cables, I finish ...


0

I have internal cables on my bicycle. I ride about 4 miles every day in an area with four seasons. The largest advantage I have found with internal cables lays in the ease with which I can clean the frame when road salt or muddy splash collects on the frame's surface. As many people have pointed out, it is not an especially strong feature but if you wash ...


0

in addition to @RoboKaren's answer: Race drivers prefer them because it makes bikes more aerodynamic. For off road (and not) makes cables catch less dirt which makes them last longer and need less maintenance.


2

A lot of people think that narrow tyres are dangerous for anyone other than experts, and that the narrower the tyre, the more likely they are to fall off. They also don't appreciate that there can be disadvantages in having suspension.


1

This could well be a regional variation. I tend to see that most BSOs are "fast hybrid" commuter style bikes. Straight handlebars, soft saddle, wide road tyres and road suitable gearing. The mountain bikes that were so cool in my youth (1990s) have largely faded out and road bikes with drop handlebars that my father remembers dominating in his youth are ...


5

It's much easier to make a chunky looking frame cheaply than to make thin tubing cheaply. The heavier everything is supposed to be the less obvious it is that the BSO is not what it looks like. One key give-away is that the mountain bike is always marked "not suitable for off road use". Road bikes also have to use more expensive components, specifically ...


0

In addition to the other answers, the BSO appeals because it is not like the bikes in the purchaser's history. Many BSOs forgo the traditional diamond frame in favour of big chunky monotube designs. These bikes look nothing like the 70s/80s ten-speed, or the Raleigh 20 style, or the grifters and BMXs of my youth. So when the parents want something ...


11

Many BSO's are styled like mountain bikes, probably because the mountain bike features tend to be appealing to people who don't know a lot about bicycles. Consumers buy these bicycles even though they will never use them on anything resembling a mountain trail. A thick frame, thick, knobby tires, and suspension make a bicycle look rugged. The appearance of ...


14

When shopping for BSO bikes, people are just looking for a recreational ride that is a once in while, which leads them to focus on the sticker price. Looking at a mountain bike they then get to thinking "Hey, I can ride this around town. I can take it off roading if I wanted too.", so more bang for their buck. They also tend to look at the other ...


2

I was amazed to recently discover the Dura Ace carbon body is 0.5mm narrower than the body on the Ultegra. This was discovered quite by accident. I have a carbon centaur equipped winter bike on which I have Ultegra 6800 pedals and a specialised roubaix with 105. So I decided to finally splash out on dura ace pedals to match the dura ace 9000 group set on ...



Top 50 recent answers are included