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Competitive Cyclist has a lot of information on fitting your bike including an interactive measurement calculator. - http://www.competitivecyclist.com/Store/catalog/fitCalculatorBike.jsp A more in depth fit guide is here. http://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/bikefit/2011/11/knee-pain/ Educating yourself is important, but you probably need to have a good ...


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I would suggest a serious conversation with your local bike shop(s). Do your research, identify what you want, and ask them to do a bike fitting and order the correct size for you. The idea is to encourage them to invest in you while you invest in them. They may want a deposit up front. But if you can convince them to get what you want, you have started a ...


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Here's a link to some information about the bike. According to that page, that model hasn't been made since 1999 and had an original sticker price of $799. So it's at least 16 years old. Depending on what condition it's in and if any parts have been replaced or upgraded, I'd try to get the seller to bring the price down a little. That being said, it actually ...


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Welcome to cycling. 325 bucks is really not too much for a complete bike (you'll understand this better later on). So, go for it as long as the sizing is correct for you. If you are not sure about sizing, take the bike to an LBS and have them do a (paid) assesment and fit in case you buy it.


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Silence... I've found this works in most negotiations. Ask a direct but open question like "what's the deal with discounts on this bike" and then just wait until the other person fills the silence. Even when it feels like they've finished talking, if they haven't really answered your question stay quiet and don't make confirming sounds. They will almost ...


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As someone who has bought bikes at cost in the past, there is more margin in bicycles then what these LBS want us to believe. For example a 2000 bike, the approximate cost to make at factory is roughly 700 dollars. They sell it to the LBS for 1200-1400 and then they sell it to the consumer for 2099. If you think these numbers are not realistic, I have ...


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There are four measurements you need to be concerned with. The two most critical are the fork steerer diameter and the bar clamp diameter. The fork steerer diameter is normally referred to as 1", 1-1/8", or in some cases 1-1/2". The bar clamp diameter can be 1"/25.4mm (typically MTB), 26mm (typically road), 1-1/8"/31.8mm (commonly called oversized or OS). ...


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1 and 1/8" is referring to the diameter steerer tube that the stem is designed to fit. 1-1/8" is roughly 28.5 mm, very close to the steerer tube you measured, that seems to check out, though try obtaining a steerer tube measurement in inches. 25.4, 26, 31.8 are your options for handlebar diameter, so hopefully you can match a set of handlebars you like to ...



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