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Steel, steel, steel. Anyone who has owned a good to high end steel bike (4130 tubing or better, with Prestige being perhaps at the top of the touring food chain) and has also owned aluminum will disparage aluminum until the sun goes down. There is no comparison. As to bar ends, they are perfect for touring, and cantilever brakes are the best choice ...


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It sounds like the main problem with your bike is that the position is too low. Is your stem already at its highest possible position? If so, it's still relatively easy to raise the bars. You can buy a stem extender as a cheaper option: http://www.amazon.com/Sunlite-Cromo-Quill-Stem-Extender/dp/B000AO9ZE8 Or a tall stem as a more elegant option: ...


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My two cents: Most component manufacturers trickle down their product tech to lower groupsets over time. So compare a 1996 Shimano Dura-Ace component, that has 9 speeds, to a modern-day 105 component, which has 11 speeds. That, in addition to all the frame geometry engineering that comes with modern bikes! In my experience newer bikes with lower components ...


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I have a old Fuji Royale that my dad bought from a junkie they year i was born, (1982), i still ride that bike. the bike was way too big for him so he never rode it much and it sat in the garage until i was 25, it turned out to be the perfect size for me, since i'm more about 6 inches taller than him. i converted it to a single speed as the chain/derailleurs ...


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I've been testing a 1984's Centurion Elite road bike, but I'm more a crosscountry and downhill rider, so a the beguinning I had a lot of discomfort, and could not ride for longer than 20 minutes, while in an XC bike I can ride for 7 hours straight. After a few tries, it became obvious that's it was a fit problem so I moved the saddle a little towards the ...


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A new seat post (carbon with more flex instead of metal) or a new saddle works wonders. You might also raise the handlebar and/or shorten the stem. If you can put on fatter tyres, like 28 or 25mm instead of 23mm will bring a noticeable increase of comfort.


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A new road bike won't be any more comfortable and will probably put you in an even more aero position. If you still have all original parts, you might want to get new stem, bars, levers, and hoods which will make it more comfortable to ride on the hoods, and the new bars are wider which is also easier on the hands. A stem that angles up a bit can also help ...


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I suggest that you go to your local bike shop and see if you can test ride a modern bike. As Daniel says $500 will not get you far. A test ride of a couple of bikes at different price points will help you decide. You may find that your "retro" bike is OK after all. Or maybe that it never did fit you properly. But a new bike could be 5kg lighter than what ...


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This started as a comment but I must be in a wordy mood this morning - here's a suggestion and a few things to consider. First though, when it comes to brand, any of the "proper" brands would do, it depends what you're comfortable on. For multi-purpose use I recommend a hybrid with flat bars - but add ergo grips and/or bar ends. Hybrids generally have rack ...



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