Hot answers tagged

26

What type of shorts? First you need to work out what sort of cycle shorts you are looking for: Regular cycling shorts - these are your classic lycra bike shorts, no bibs, no extra fancy bits. Generally quite comfortable They do have a tendancy to "roll up" under your gut a bit, particularly for those of us that carry a bit more weight than we should. ...


25

Padded seats tend to have more padding than used at any given time. This pushes the other 'extra' padding into the soft tissues. This causes numbness and discomfort over time. So slim hard seats are actually more comfortable over time, if they are the right size. You need to make sure your sit bones (ischial tuberosity) are well situated. The sit bones of ...


25

I'm currently a senior in high school, so I understand your concern about style. In my opinion, and that of all my friends, wearing lycra shorts to school looks ridiculous, no offense. I don't know how far your commute is, but when I take my road bike to school, it's only 3 miles, so I just wear regular shorts and bring another t-shirt I can throw on so I'm ...


17

Do you wear underwear with them? Can I wear shorts over them? Absolutely not. Nothing over or under, just the bike shorts. Do I really need them? For 200 miles? Hell yeah. Your ass will thank you.


15

Wear some non-Lycra shorts/tracksuit bottoms over the top of your Lycra ones if you are self conscious about them. Change out of the Lycra ones in a toilet cubicle if you are concerned. You can also buy baggy cycling specific shorts which have many of the advantages of Lycra based ones but without the concern about showing off your entire package. A quick ...


14

Unless you are travelling really far (5+ miles) or going for some kind of home to school time trial record, just wear your regular clothes (tuck your trousers into your socks if need be) and cycle a little slower. Too many people are too obsessed with racing their bikes places, but if you think of cycling as a faster and more efficient way of walking then ...


12

Yikes. 200 miles, just like that? Have you been training for it at all? I'm not talking about the endurance aspect -- I'm assuming you're in good enough shape to even consider it -- I'm talking about the physical act of your rear end being on a bike seat for 15-20 hours. Yes, you need the bike shorts, 'taint no question about it. You also need to be ready ...


9

Putting the padding in the shorts means that the padding will always be exactly where you need it. Most people tend to change their position on the bike a bit, specially when riding longer tours. With the padded saddles, the padding won't change when you alter your position, which can result in blisters or sores.


8

The short (pun intended) answer is "yes." Or at the very least, "probably yes." One of the big things that makes saddles uncomfortable is pressure on the soft tissues between your "sit bones" (the ischial tuberosities). It may seem counterintuitive, but padded saddles can make this worse. The problem is that the padding allows your sit bones to sink into the ...


7

A die-cut and formed chamois will generally be more comfortable than just a plain pad. This type of chamois will usually have pre-formed creases and differing levels of padding in different areas. More "panels" will generally contour to fit your body better than fewer panels. All of my favorite shorts in the past have been 8-panel or higher. I also ...


7

The short answer is "sometimes". There are a few different styles of leg grippers. Some are more likely to stretch than others. Thick Silicone leg grippers, in my experience stretch the least and are the least comfortable. While they do a great job of not letting the pant leg slip, I find the level of discomfort not worth it. My favorite kind have a ...


7

Like everything... it depends. If you're doing short distances, pretty much any saddle is fine, with or without padding. For longer distances, good shorts may help a saddle's shortcomings, and a good saddle will help make up for no or bad shorts. But for the most comfort, a good saddle teamed with well fitting shorts works best. Personally, I got the ...


6

It's not really clear what you mean by look professional. If you mean a professional cyclist, then a cycling outfit is the way to go. They are designed to be comfortable for cycling, and to keep your leg muscles warm. But if you mean professional as in office worker professional, then that's a problem that many of us struggle with. Firstly, how far do ...


6

As far as personal comfort goes, you want a chamois that's thick and stiff enough to provide padding, but not so thick or stiff as to feel diaper-ish. A thick pad that you can squeeze to almost nothing with your fingers will act the same way when you sit on it. But whatever you do, don't skimp on your shorts. Everyone will have personal preferences as to ...


6

It's not really "padding", although it does offer a cushion. It's a chamois, which part of its purpose is to absorb moisture and wick it away from your skin which helps reduce friction. This is aided by creams that condition the chamois. and +1 to @Matt Adams answer.


5

You'll only benefit from better bibs, insofar as they fit as they should. Given that you seem content with your current set, start with the same size when making a new purchase. For the differences... Start by checking the stitching all the way around on the new ones that you're interested in and compare it to those that you already know. Quite a bit of ...


5

I have bought my last few shorts by direct experimentation at stores, and had the same doubts as yours. Mostly, what has worked is: you dress the shorts, and stand right up with feet in the normal position. In this position, the shorts should not produce a "bulk" between the thighs. Shorts that produce the bulk tend to be too uncomfortable either while on ...


5

The short answer is, ask friends for recommendations. Bike shorts are, unfortunately, much like buying underwear: You need to try them on to know what'll work, and you pretty much can't return them after trying them on. Unlike underwear, good bike shorts are a not-insignificant expense. Some stores will let you try them on if you wear underwear, though. I ...


5

These look like normal wearing patterns of cycling shorts, unfortunately. My last 3 shorts (last five or six years) had to be put away because they became "transparent" right in the regions where they COULDN'T be transparent, even though they were still pretty much rideable. But it was very unconvenient to go inside convenience stores, for example. I ...


5

Eventually, the material will thin out and holes will start to appear. Objectively, if people can see your junk, then it's time to retire the shorts (or, in colder climates, restrict them to winter-only duty under tights). The chamois will deteriorate over time as well, so if a pair of shorts isn't as comfortable as it once was, it's about time to throw it ...


5

There's no right/wrong answer. Just make sure you have some sort of towel available so you can wipe your hands before riding. What I generally do is place dabs on the chamois and rub the sides together to spread it around -- keeps the hands relatively clean and doesn't require a separate applicator. Some people prefer to rub it on their butt. I don't use ...


5

While in your question you say you don't use a chamois, I'm going to give some general recommendations for others looking to find quick dry shorts or pants. Since specific recommendations go out of date, I'm not linking to any particular brand or model of shorts... Almost every pair of mountain biking shorts I have owned would be what I would consider ...


5

Saddles are highly personal-- one person likes a particular saddle, but you may not-- but there is a reason most cyclists who ride 50+ miles in one ride do so with shorts or bibs that contain some kind of chamois: it is more comfortable. That said, does it mean a person can't go long distances without a chamois? Of course not. There are people in the world ...


4

I suspect that some of the fibers in the fabric have broken with use, and the washing causes the broken fibers to slip out of the fabric and "show themselves". This happens in areas of high friction or where there's a lot of "scrunching/unscrunching" as you pedal.


4

I assume given the distance, that you're doing this journey on a road and on a road bike? You'll be pleased to learn that, as Criggie says, your height is pretty much irrelevant. You will need to decide between shorts and bibshorts (which come up over your shoulders). Many riders prefer bibshorts because they dispense with the line of elastic around your ...


3

The only way to truly evaluate padding is by wearing the short/bibs for a few rides. Once you find a brand that you like the chamois in, stick with them. In regards to evaluating the chamois in the store, the only advice I can give is to look at what you already have and compare to that. It depends on what you are looking for in a chamois, but padding in ...


3

It's never a good idea to rely on the saddle for padding. The reason is simple. The sit-bones will sink into the softest saddle and therefore put extra pressure on other parts of the male anatomy where you end up feeling as if your 'privates' dropped off on the road a few miles back. You should also be 'fitted' for a seat so that you get the right width of ...


3

As a followup to my answer on "Picking Chamois Creme", BodyGlide hasn't affected the life of my shorts so far after 3 years of heavy use. But it never completely washes out either. My experience with other products is too limited to comment.


3

Just a small tip : be sure that the fabric is not to transparent. You don't want the person riding behind seeing things they'd rather not, especially when it's sunny this is happened to me more then once.



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