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28

I use a sort of wave, raising my hand but with no movement in it (so not a 'Hey buddy' or 'I need help' side to side movement).... it works on my bicycle, on my motorcycle, and while driving a vehicle. It's got somewhat of a dual purpose: acknowledgement that I did something wrong, and/or 'thanks for letting me in' gratitude gesture. The motorcycle I find a ...


19

I should imagine you should be looking for some reflective gloves. Or even some glo gloves Check these out as an example ... http://lifehacker.com/395978/glo-gloves-reflective-cycling-gear Also using a good reflective jacket that has good reflective strips down the arms is useful.


18

I'd go for the air-horn, for example the AirZound. It is my opinion that screaming and yelling (the primal scream) can cause a lot of unnecessary social distress, and is not a good alterntive for traffic communication and signalling under normal conditions. It ends up being more effective when you're in "panic" as said, which is barely a day-by-day ...


15

Screaming is faster and much more effective: I suspect it's usually best. Or use an electric horn or air horn. About screaming: The BHSI writes as follows. We don't find that horns do much for safety on a bicycle. Your voice is faster to react and adapts better to different situations. The primal scream produces good adrenalin-based reactions in ...


13

I'd recommend learning to do arm signals. Arm signals don't run out of batteries, and are plenty visible in most cases. They're certainly bigger than the turn signal lights you could put on a bicycle (which as Moz points out in a comment, makes distinguishing the 2 turn signals a possible issue), and the distance you need to see a bike turning is a lot ...


10

Actual legal signals: Left Turn - hand out straight to the left (with palm forward (not down or up). I'll often point with two fingers to help convey the message. Right Turn - hand out straight to the right; mirror of the left turn.† Stop (or slow) - Left hand straight down with palm flat. Commonly recommended but not necessarily exactly what the ...


9

Flashing yellow arrows have been introduced in the US recently to help ease congestion at intersections. This signal should be treated similar to a yield sign or a turn lane not controlled by its own traffic signal. If there is no oncoming traffic, you may make a left turn if it is safe to do so, but you must yield to any oncoming traffic and to any ...


8

Similar to the LED gloves, you can always make a signaling jacket. I bet I know a few of our friends that would be totally down helping with that ;)


8

I have seen and used a sheepish wave and a shoulder shrug or head bow, never had someone try to beat me up after that.


7

Being a motorcyclist, I stick to the standard hand signals using the left arm. At least in Arizona (other states may vary) this is listed as the official method for turn signaling, and even appears in the Driver License Manual. Left arm straight out: Turning left. Left arm bent pointing the hand straight up: Turning right. Left arm bent pointing the ...


6

Putting reflective bands on your sleeves can help make your movements visible. They don't need to be attached permanently: a second pair of trouser clips works very well when strapped around your cuffs, or possibly the cuffs of your gloves if you're wearing big winter gloves. Something like Ron Hill snap bands (there are lots of equivalent products with ...


6

You are from Germany so German laws are relevant. In this case §16 I StVO. (1) Schall- und Leuchtzeichen darf nur geben 1. wer außerhalb geschlossener Ortschaften überholt (§ 5 Abs. 5) oder 2. wer sich oder andere gefährdet sieht. Attempt at translating to English: (1) Sound and light signals may only be used: 1. when passing (overtaking) outside ...


6

I have noticed that shouting (whatever words you use) is often taken personally by the drivers. It's probably the most effective and quickest to use in an emergency as described. I've seen several cyclists with a football whistle on a lanyard round the neck (mine is on my helmet strap) that can be held loosly between the teeth.


5

In the UK, a car's use of the horn is meant to be limited: Highway Code rule 112 (n.b. capitalised phrases are generally indicative of the legal position): Use only while your vehicle is moving and you need to warn other road users of your presence. Never sound your horn aggressively. You MUST NOT use your horn : * while stationary on the road * ...


5

From a UK government website I found the following document (linked from a page about the Highway Code for cyclists). Signals to other road users (scroll to the bottom for cyclist information) Essentially there are three signals for cyclists: Left arm out - "I intend to move in to the left or turn left" Right arm out - "I intend to move out to the right ...


5

The Right Turn and Stop signals (using the left hand) make sense when driving a car, since you can't stick your right hand out the window, but on a bike the right-arm/right-turn signal is probably more intuitive and therefore understandable.


5

I wave if I can but sometimes that's not possible because I'm controlling the bike. I always give them a look of apology and say "sorry" even though they can't hear me. I slightly exaggerate the look and the lip movements so that I can be sure that they see it. And most people can read lips well enough to pick up "sorry" even across an intersection. I ...


5

In Hawaii, it's common for drivers (and cyclists, I suppose) to use the shaka to communicate an apology on the road: To folks who know about it, the sign carries the same range of positive meanings as Aloha and should be taken as a friendly gesture. While it doesn't specifically communicate apology, the sign is used as a relaxed greeting, which could ...


4

I posted a link to this question to the Bike Friday Yak list - tandem riding is popular there - and got back a few responses, this one in particular. I'm posting this here simply because nobody else seems to have an answer; If this isn't typical, please feel free to edit this answer. A standard signalling vocabulary seems to not exist. Teams need to ride ...


4

The work around is to practice. It takes practice to be able to turn around and look behind you while still biking straight. It sounds really simple and easy, but it's not. Signaling while slowing is the same way.


4

It is important to signal at all times because we can never be SURE that we are totally aware of every other road user. Have you ever had a car "suddenly" appear on your left, seemingly out of nowhere? If you haven't at some point you will. It is natural. Sometimes, despite heightened awareness, we miss something in the near-chaos that is a busy street. ...


4

The key to signalling is that you should not endanger yourself while doing it. To be honest, I only ever signal if I think that there is someone else in the immediate vicinity who will benefit from seeing the signal because I don't think that they understand what I'm going to do from the already available other cues. The car brake light is passive, the ...


4

Short answer - there's no widely recognized hand gesture for I'm sorry. You could try the American Sign Language for sorry: I'm not sure how likely it is that this will be understood by the other person though.


3

I understand that there are some places in Europe where everyone driving a car honks their horn at every corner. That's probably excessive (and relatively useless). (For the US-ians among us:) Unlike the US, in parts of Europe (such as Norway, where I've visited several times) and other parts of the world there is no established "pecking order" for one ...


3

I started tandeming with my wife as stoker, and it was suffering. She is a bit anxious on traffic, and made me too aware of low-level actions about controlling the bike. Eventually, she gave up worrying and we started to talk not about riding or about the bike, but about anything else. Then the things started to really work and we had fun. With my stepson, ...


3

I did a project to add electronic Arduino turn signals, brake lights, speedometer, and odometer to my bike. You can check out my project here: http://jdeboi.com/pimpmybike/


3

Learn to look back while riding straight. That is much more important than making any signal. Also the movement of the head is usually a good indication to the driver behind of what your intentions are.


2

In addition to the normal right, left signals, I also like to give little friendly waves to any drivers where they've demonstrated a rudimentary knowledge of the highway code, such as not turning across my path when I have right of way.


2

When I'm turning left I put my left arm straight out. When I'm turning right I put my right arm straight out. Then I do the Hokey Cokey.....sorry got a bit carried away there. I vaguely remember from my Cycling Proficiency test that flapping your right arm up and down signals that you're stopping, but in the more than 30 years since I passed it I don't ...



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