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This is probably more complicated than you think it is. This depends on your bike. A lot of bikes which are spec'd with say 42t front chainrings for the big ring can't clear a 50t big ring in the front without the chain interfering with something. You'll also have to worry about chain line and possibly installing something to prevent the chain dropping. ...


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You probably don't need to purchase a new crankset. You can remove the the rings you don't need and simply add a new ring. You'll need to know the distance of the bolt holes of your current chainrings/crank. This is known as the BCD (bolt circle diameter) and you can usually find it stamped on the chainring. Common sizes include 130mm, 110mm, 94mm, etc. ...


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The kit you link to is to replace a cassette on a freehub. What you have is a freewheel, not a freehub. You need a screw-on freewheel, such as those fitted to BMX and trials bikes. I recommend one with removal lugs (cheaper freewheels don't). I currently use a White Industries freewheel on one of my bikes. It's expensive, but I've been using it for years ...


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Rather than eyeballing, ballparking, or relying on tables, I have found that a ruler is the simplest and most accurate tool for this job. Put the ruler with the zero mark in the middle of the seat tube, and measure the distance to the teeth on the chainring. Then measure the inside diameter of the frame at the rear dropouts where the rear axle goes. ...


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Based on my experience, determining the chainline based on specifications of the components (BB and Crankset) and a simple math calculation is the best approach. This is because I was having a hard time to ballpark the chainline. I then found out that the manufacturer of the crankset I use provides a specification document which describes the recommended ...


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You won't like the price tag on this solution, but to get my single speed bike with a perfect chainline, I used the Surly Single-Speed Kit which has 6 spacers of different widths that let you get things exactly right. The kits run about $40, but you also need a rear hub with the Shimano style cassette mount, such as for a 5-cog cassette on a 10-speed bike.



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