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7

The QR system was designed before the advent of modern disc brakes, and as such there are a few peculiarities such as the one you are experiencing. You should only worry about rubbing after clamping the QR. No fork or drop-out is perfectly set. When you put the wheel in the dropout with the QR open, there likely be a bit of slack in how it fits in the ...


7

Aside from weight, there is no real benefit. Titanium is an alloyed steel, and has no limitation on weight or riding style, generally, although there are likely ultra light versions which do have limits.


4

They come with bolts because QR's typcially don't clamp with enough force to keep the wheel from slipping forward. It looks like you have rear facing dropouts, so you should easily be able to use QR's if you get yourself a Surly Tuggnut. That little circle on the side of it is a QR adapter. You just pop it in and then slide your skewer all the way ...


4

I haven't used them myself, but I've been asked to remove a broken set. A customer came back to their bike and discovered that a thief had tried to force them and failed. But not before breaking both front and rear lever mechanisms. I got both off without damaging the rest of the bike at all, with a cutting disk in the grinder they come off in seconds. ...


3

Any sort of rubbing is undesirable. But, when the QR is open, things are likely to rub because the wheel can move around in the dropouts, so the only thing that needs attention is the rubbing when the QR is closed. Your front tyre should be centred between the forks when the QR is closed, if it's not and your disc is rubbing you certainly need some ...


3

Titanium alloys are typically made of Aluminum and Vanadium: e.g. on a 3AL/2.5V Ti bike Frames for instance there is 3% Aluminum, 2.5% Vanadium and the rest is Titanium. Main benefits of Titanium is no corrosion, immense resistance to fatigue (material failure due to cyclic constraints), and weight indirectly (i.e. stronger material allows to use thinner ...


3

Changing cassette shouldn't require you to pull the axle (4) from the hub body. To get all this put back together you're going to need at least 1 15mm or 17mm (depending on hub) cone wrench and a little bit of know-how. I would assemble what you have there as 4-6-9-6-5 starting from the inside. The tricky part is getting the locknut (5) tight against the ...


3

I think there's more wrong than you've spotted. Unless there's a chunk missing from the end of the axle or the dropout you shouldn't get any movement under power or not. Bending a QR skewer is not easy to do, which suggests that there's a lot of force being applied, and it's obviously being applied where it shouldn't be. Here's a picture of that model, and ...


3

There is no issue with using a Q/R or fixed end anti theft skewer on a horizontal dropout. They are well above the threshold of strength required to fix your wheel in the dropouts.


3

It depends on how aggressive you ride. If you are a casual rider and rarely do many jumps or drops then they should work just fine. I am a pretty aggressive rider and have snapped more than my fair share of skewers trying to keep the wheel in place. I have also snapped a number of hollow axles because they are just not strong enough for the riding I do. So I ...


2

The rear wheel (with a Ti skewer) on one of my road bikes would flex and rub against the frame when I stomped on the pedals or climbed a steep hill no matter how tight I made the skewer. I fixed the problem by switching to a steel skewer. No more flex and even the rear derailleur shifts better.


2

For skewers, weight. That's it. Ti skewers will make your bike and your wallet lighter.


2

I've always used a quick release for the front of my fixed gear bike, I've only ever used the bolts on the back. His highness Sir Sheldon Brown says you should be okay to use a quick release with an enclosed cam ( not an exposed cam ) with an acorn nut that has steel teeth ( not aluminum teeth ). http://sheldonbrown.com/skewers.html disclaimer: there's no ...


2

I have broken a Ti stem that held my handlbars. Ti seat rail Ti frame (in 3 places now, alas) So Ti is not magical, but this is on a 18 year old frame now, so not that surprising. I have broken several axles, but steel ones have been sufficient for the last few years for me. I suspect weight is the only benefit, however when you care at the level ...


2

I was looking into a similar thing today, and the Pitlock FAQ specifically states: "If you have horizontal dropouts on your bike's rear wheel (horizontal and open at the rear), we dissuade you from using the Pitlock system. Usually (almost) all rear wheels are assembled in vertical dropouts (opening diagonally towards the bottom). Here the assembly with ...


2

I had these until the front skewer was defeated and the wheel stolen. I can't tell for certain what the method was because thankfully there was no damage to the fork. See the attached photo of scratches on the handle to the rear skewer - this makes me think a prying tool was used to apply enough force to snap something. I will not buy these again and I would ...


2

The point of the quick release skewer they give you with a trainer is generally to prevent damage to your fancy skewer already on your bike, and make sure the trainer can grip onto the axle properly. If you have a quick release system, you should use the provided skewer. If you have a thru axle like a Maxle, you may need to buy a special adapter. If you ...


1

When building bikes, I always make sure the QR is on as tight as it should be when ridden before anchoring the caliper to the fork. The fork will always flex a little when you loosen the QR so rubbing discs is not uncommon with loose QR's. It should NOT be rubbing when the QR is closed and your front tire should be centered between the forks. The offset tire ...


1

Please see my comment above. Reading the complete FAQ actually confirms my claims, as the track dropout is "horizontal AND opens at the rear", whereas your dropouts "open diagonally towards the bottom": If you have horizontal dropouts on your bike's rear wheel (horizontal and open at the rear), we dissuade you from using the Pitlock system. Usually ...


1

Yes, in fact you should cut it down because it's both a safety hazard (easy to gouge your ankles on an exposed bolt) as well as maintenance issue (it's easy to bend the exposed axle bolt and thus make it very difficult to unscrew the QR nut). There are two ways to cut it, the first is on the bike and the second is off the bike. On the bike: Keep the ...


1

You can cut the skewer, but be sure to leave enough thread on there to keep the nut on when the QR is opened enough to take it off your bike (without having to remove the nut). Don't forget to file the sharp cut edge smooth afterwards.


1

Just to add to the other answers, it is my experience that you can't get as secure a fit with a QR skewer as with a nutted axle. If your bike has track forks (like below), rather than forward facing horizontal dropouts, you can probably get away with this, especially by adding a chain tug to keep the wheel from sliding forward in the rear fork end. If ...


1

Please note that since those fenders are mounted on the outer side of the frame, your skewers are tightened against the fender brackets instead of tightened directly against the frame. Therefore the skewer's nut splines and material are not the only thing to look at. You could of course get a pair of those anti-theft-skewers that you tighten with a wrench to ...


1

in my experience bolt on rear wheels with horizontal drop outs / single speeds actually perform better.


1

It is light, and doesn't corrode. The skewer doesn't take weight at all - that is all held on the axle. The skewer just provides compressive force to stop the axle dropping out of the forks.


1

Ti = really expensive = really light = usually racing parts = shortened lifespan due to the gram saving which actually weakens the parts for the long haul. If you race and need every ounce shaved off and your sponser is paying then they're great. If you don't race or are paying your own way then you'd be better off spending your cash on something meant for ...



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