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21

Studded tires are a must on ice. They are expensive, but well worth it! A couple of points to consider that have not been mentioned: Footwear: Winter specific riding shoes or boots. For mountain biking and cross, I ride with Lake boots. On the road, I use an older pair of road shoes that have been stretched to accommodate thick wool socks and neoprene shoe ...


18

Riding in snow depends on a bunch of factors, so you won't really ever be able to know unless you just go for it and try it out. What bike/wheels you have Should be obvious. Mountain vs Road, 26" vs 29", wide vs skinny tires, etc Your skill level in snow The better and more comfortable you are in the snow is important. I'd say its the most important ...


18

-20C is -4F, cold enough to be uncomfortable for humans, but not particularly cold for mechanical equipment. You will notice that lubricants get stiffer, but generally they warm up rapidly when you ride and the stiffness will be gone in a minute or two. Hydraulic fluids, et al, should be good to -35C or below, though they will stiffen before that, ...


11

Like the other answers, disc brakes are the only way to go if you plan on your brakes getting wet at all. After riding disc brakes for a while now, I will never go back, even in good conditions. I would also really recommend hydraulic disc brakes over mechanical ones, especially in poor conditions. With hydraulic brakes, you don't have to pull as hard to get ...


11

I live in Yakutsk, Russia, where the temperature sometimes drops as low as -45 °C. I don't think anything can break if all your parts are in good condition. But I think you shouldn't let your bike stay out in the cold for too long. I suspect the oil in the suspension fork can freeze, temporarily changing it into a rigid fork. You will need ice tires if you ...


8

My experience from last winter was that I could keep moving through falling sticky snow up to about 6" = 15cm but it took a great deal of effort, even more so if your tyres end up cracking through frozen puddles under the snow. There were sections where I had to pedal hard just to keep moving even down some normally fast downhill sections. It's great fun - ...


8

ICEBIKE has a good page describing studded tires, including how to make your own. The basic process is as you describe: drive screws from the inside of the tire and cover them with something to protect the tube. Count the knobs and evenly spread out the 25 screws for each side. Punch holes, from the outside of the tire, into the designated ...


7

If you'll be riding on ice, you definitely need studded tires. For snow, you need wider tires than the typical road bike -- more of a mountain/hybrid tire, with a lugged design. How wide depends on how deep and soft the snow will be. Fenders are generally not a good idea since they'll tend to get clogged with snow. For clothing you don't need anything ...


7

There's not much you can do aside from cleaning your drivetrain often and thoroughly. In the winter, ice is far less of a mechanical issue than is rock salt. You may indeed have some corrosion in the entire drivetrain by this point, not just the deraileur, or possibly just dirt if you're lucky. I'd do one major cleaning at this point, and see if that takes ...


7

I expect you should have ice tires. Your brakes aren't user-serviceable, are they: so I'd ask whoever maintains them, about e.g. whether you have the right, sufficiently new and well installed brake pads. I bought a similar bike (i.e. alu and disc brakes) in Toronto in February for commuting, with the LBS assuring me it would be road-worthy. You have front ...


7

The bike doesn't matter that much, except when there's snow or ice on the roads. What you need most is the right clothing. It needs to be well-adapted to cycling (not loose or apt to get caught in the chain), layered so you can take off pieces BEFORE you get too warm, with wind-resistant and rain-resistant layers. Your shoes need to be somehow protected ...


6

Frequently lubing your components (especially your chain) is crucial in cold weather. Lube (which won't freeze) pushes out water (which does). Besides the protection against freezing, it also will help extend the life of your components even in the face of sand, salt, and gravel debris from cities deicing the roads. Fenders with mud flaps are useful as well, ...


6

If you have disc brakes you can use zip ties to create a cheap studded tire and can remove the zip ties when you're done. Get long enough zip ties to go around your tire and rim. Because of this, it will not work with rim based brakes.


5

The best thing to do is make your own studded tires from the old tires you have. You can buy roofing nails for very cheap, and put lots of studs on the tire (most commercially available studded tires don't have that many studs). Push the nails through from the inside of the tire, wherever you want them. It's a good idea to put some on the rolling surface, ...


5

Basically: weight/psi = square inches. Has to be combined weight of rider and cycle. And it's approximate. And much easier with a unicyle: with a bicycle you need to know weight distribution, which can change during a ride. Minor things that make it only an estimate: Compression from weight increases psi, making contact patch smaller than estimate. ...


5

Bike tires are treaded to grab on customers rather than the road. Obviously, different tread patterns will perform differently off road, that is: on earth, mud, gravel, sand, roots.. BUT - contrary to popular belief - on the road, whether it is concrete, tarmac or asphalt, treads will do nothing except offer a slightly slower ride and at the same time, less ...


5

I am nearly certain the answer is no. Any metal or hard plastic will flex very little compared to the rubber of the tire, which flexes more than you think. There is no glue I have ever heard of or used, including the Gorilla glues and epoxies, that would ever hold these two together - it'd essentially have to be so strong that the rubber won't flex under ...


5

http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/radar/index_e.html Use the moisture radar, it's your best tool to see when the rain is coming and when it's going with great detail. If you take the time to familiarize yourself with it you'll start to get a feel for how different types of rain look on the radar and where it's going to hit.


5

Having lived in a few parts of the US, I've found what people call small to medium to be drastically different based on the region ("oh yeah, we just had a light snow last night", and i look outside to see 4+ inches versus "it snowed like crazy last night" and i look outside to see a half inch and the whole city has come to a grinding halt), so its a bit ...


4

I tend to use my old beaten-up bikes to commute in winter time because I know the winter will destroy them anyways (the crud, the slush splashing, the salt, etc.) and I don't want to ruin my good summer bike.. This, combined with my tight financial situation, makes for unsafe rides most of the time (failing brakes, no gears and other weird stuff), ESPECIALLY ...


4

Slick tires are better in the wet than treaded tires. The best explanation I've seen is here: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html Car tires have tread to stop them aquaplaning in the wet, bike don't get fast enough for their contact foot print for that to matter. As I sometime ride my cross bike with knobby tires on wet road I can assure you they're much ...


4

Snow is some of the hardest stuff to bike through, and riding in eight inches of loose snow is either impossible or a real slog depending on what tire you use. Not to try to dissuade you, but I personally find riding through any more than a couple inches of snow to be more hassle than it's worth. For anything less than 2 inches, I don't think that the tire ...


3

I agree with the other answers, but think one subtle detail is important. It depends on the type of snow. Eskimos have 50 words for snow? Well there really are different types. Light and fluffy is easy. Deep and heavy gets to be problematic. There comes a point, where each forward motion is wasted as the wheel spins, while sinking down through the ...


3

You may actually have one of a few problems. The problem that comes with biking in the snow/ice is not only moisture, but salt, and other road debris/grime that can get into your chain or derailleur. Leaving your bike outside, covered not, is a guaranteed way to corrode your parts as the moisture in the air gets into your frame, cable housings, bearings, any ...


3

Depends on how heavy it is and what you want to do. For a light snow, below the hubs should be fine. For heavier snows and slush, well, you have to worry more about losing control of the front wheel. Fatter tires or a mountain bike are easier to ride in slush and snow. If you want to test the limits go as fast as is safe 2.use a big gear keep a light ...


3

You'll probably have the best luck with disc brakes, any other type will loose their power in the wet and snow.


3

I have Roller Brake (a type of hub brakes) and have never had problems in the rain, I don’t know how well they will work at -25c as the grease may go hard.


3

It depends Belt drives require some mechanism to prevent the belt slipping off of the sprockets sideways. Early generation belt drives have guides on both sides of the sprocket to keep the belt from sliding off. This can definitely lead to snow, mud or other debris getting trapped in the sprockets, getting packed in tighter with every revolution, and ...


3

My experience with riding 12 years through the winter in Toronto is that your bike is going to get ruined. Find a source for reasonable to cheap better mountain bikes and be ready to discard them after 2 or 3 winters at most. I found a couple of things helpful. Boots: Canadian Tire (sort of a car/tools/stuff store) sold these hunting boots that were ...



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