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You can avoid this problem altogether with studded tires The pattern is deep enough so that it grabs quite well on the snow, and the studs give you a very good grip on ice and hard snow. On uniformly flat ice, the grip is almost as good as asphalt. If the tires are good, you can wear them for all winter season, even if there is no ice. The studs are not ...


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At the time the question was asked, there were no 16" studded bike tyres. Now, however, there are: http://www.schwalbe.com/en/pressereader/spikes-for-birdy-and-brompton.html But unfortunately there are two different 16" rim sizes, and the new Schwalbes are 349mm (as used by Brompton), and 16" Dahon is 305mm. It might be possible to fit a Brompton sized ...


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After looking at the setups people were using for the arrowhead 135 race in canada that has start temps around -20f, it looked like everyone was using disc brakes. Folks were using hydraulic and cable actuated discs (Avid BB7 is wildly popular). One of the best things for disc brakes (and your shifters) is FULL HOUSING. This will help keep areas where ...


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You're describing a Fat-Front setup. Cornering on soft surfaces should be improved, as well as shock absorption if you run low pressure, but drive would only improve in the case where the fat front tyre can compact snow enough for the regular rear tyre to dig in less than it would on a standard MTB.


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All brake types that lock your wheels work. Because traction is required to stop you, spend more on better studded (ice) tires, because once your wheels are locked your tires will help you stop/not. Hydraulic brakes are overhyped. They are more prone to failure when tested in salty conditions due to more small moving parts that can corrode. Mechanical ...



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