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16

My Tracks is an app by Google that will record a path you rode with stats. You can upload your path to Google Maps and stats to Google Docs, or create a gpx/kml file for uploading to other biking, running, or fitness / mapping apps.


15

Endomondo!!!! Free your endorphins : ) I love this app!!! I have used it to track over 1,000 miles of cycling this year. The android app is just a small part of the entire service. With endomondo you get challenges with your friends live updating of your route global challenges personal bests summary teams more With their great android app you get ...


11

I don't know that you can do this with the apps you are talking about. However there is hope. Going back to first principles, you have a pc on which you want to create your route, and you have an android device which you want to stick on your bike and use for navigation. Correct? If you accept that you need to abandon Google Maps altogether, there are ...


10

A few folks I work with use Strava (http://www.strava.com). There are android and iphone apps, and you can also upload files from Garmin devices. Aside from the standard gps, route tracking stuff, the web site has a social focus. You can follow other riders if you wish. The site also allows you to define road segments and will show leaderboards, king of the ...


6

Have you tried "Get there by bike"? http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/get-there-by-bike-interactive/id457288250?mt=8 The few times i tried it i had good results. Another alternative, but i have not used yet. http://www.bikemapsapp.com/


6

CardioTrainer is an app that also works with the GPS functionality to track your workouts, and can create tracks and virtual training partners if you do the same routes.


6

I use RunKeeper Pro; from January it's free for Android; here is the description in Android Market. It's not only for cycling, but you can choose the activity type to be tracked by GPS, define custom routes and use audio coaching to know your distance, speed, time; then you can see online, in your personal account, a detailed report and a map with your ...


6

I've used Sports Tracker a lot on Symbian phones and they now have an Android version coming out (as well as an iPhone version). It can beep on auto-laps for example every kilometre. You can review your workouts on the phone, something I don't think Endomondo can do. You can use it with a Bluetooth Polar heart rate monitor. You can see things like this ...


6

You mention Strava: they do that for you. If you register components and parts of your bike like a chain it will show the mileage from the registering date. It might a bit problematic if you have two sets of wheels (like one for rain and another for sunny days)that you use alternatively.


5

I mostly use it for tracking rides after the fact, but Ride With GPS has cue sheets and route planning based off of Google maps for their paying members. From the GPS side, it works great, your mileage may vary for pre-planning.


4

Garmin do not publish the firmware or provide support for community modifications, and actually seem to be killing off the one community feature they had allowed (the ability to use non Garmin maps) in some areas. My advice - buy another device for the other bike, or just accept that navigating through 5 menus isn't really that bad:-)


4

They do not have an app, but I typically use the Course Creator on http://bikeroutetoaster.com/ to plan new rides. It gives you elevation profile and will allow you to print the cue sheets. You can export the GPX/TCX data to upload to a GPS device for on screen turn by turn cues (depending on your device). Another good option for finding new routes is to ...


4

If you are in the UK, use CycleStreets. It's a free journey-planning website designed specifically for cycling, so it can route you across off-road cycle tracks and bridges, and it gives you a choice of faster routes for more confident cyclists, and quieter routes if you want to avoid traffic. As well as the main and a mobile website, they have free apps for ...


3

There are many apps available for iOS and Android. Some of the big names: Strava EndoMondo Runkeeper MapMyRide Sports Tracker They all have a mobile application that tracks your ride and then uploads it to a central server, accessible via a website. The website often provides reports and breakdowns of your performance. They also add elevation data, but ...


3

iMapMyRide is great. It records and uploads all your route data to the iMapMyRide web site. Once uploaded you can view the route on a Google map, see the total distance travelled, see a chart of the elevation plus the total gain, add notes, log the workout and share the route with others. I really can't recommend it enough


3

SportsTrackLive is another app listed as supporting the Zephyr heart rate monitor. I haven't tried it; anyone who has, feel free to comment or edit this answer with more information.


2

Not the most convenient way of measuring your heart rate while cycling, but Instant Heart Rate is a neat program which might be useful when you to take a break. You use your phone's camera and LED flash (if it has one, otherwise any bright light source) to measure your heart rate by pressing the camera and flash against your finger, and it detects ...


2

Run.GPS is mentioned in the list of apps supporting the Zephyr heart rate monitor. I haven't tried it; anyone who has, feel free to comment or edit this answer with more information.


2

VeloComputer appears to be an attempt at turning a phone into a complete cycling computer. Version 7, which is available for Android, uses GPS for measuring position and speed, and the accelerometer to measure cadence. They also sell Bluetooth enabled wheel and pedal sensors, for more accurate speed and cadence, though those seem to only be supported on ...


2

There are many different philosophies about how much maintenance a bicycle needs, and on what schedule or basis it should be performed. As I prefer to never be worried about whether my bikes will fail under me on a ride, I am more meticulous than most. I currently have 4 bikes, each with different function. I service each bike when it's time to change ...


2

I think mapmyride.com is pretty good for mapping out routes. They do allow you to print routes, although I prefer to use the Android app.


2

Google Maps for iPhone now has bike layer support and bike-specific navigation starting with update on July 16, 2013, version 2.0


2

My app IpBike Is designed for a phone mouted on the bike, the emphesis on giving you all the information in a clear and consistant way on one basic screen while riding. Has full support for ANT+ sensors HR, speed, Cadence Speed and Cadance and Power sensors on compatible phones. Pressure based altitude of compatible phones. Direct upload for Stava, ...


2

There is https://tapiriik.com/ but it does not have Movescout support yet. There is voting page for new services: https://tapiriik.com/supported-services-poll


2

Strava is now connected with Movescount so you can sync together your stuff via this site.


2

I found driod support for these kinds of sensors to be patchy at best and not yet what I consider ready for prime time. Manufacturer provided software is often crap, third party often don't support the hardware. Many claims of features and devices suppported apply to the iPhone versions only. I current use Digifit iCardio on my driod phone with Scorche ...


2

For a chain, you typically just take your chain wear tool and see if the chain is sufficiently worn, periodically. Cassettes can be done visually (though cog wear tools like the one which is made by Rohloff) exist. These are usually better served by checking cause they're dependent on riding conditions and product types (e.g. 10 speed chains last less long ...


1

I believe you are asking two different questions: the first, how to use Coggan's Power Profile; and the second, given power at one duration, how to extrapolate and predict power at other durations. But first, an historical aside: Coggan's Power Profiles pre-date the publication of his book with Hunter Allen so really should be thought of as Coggan's own. ...


1

I love my Edge 500 and just use the GPS, no sensors needed, I get speed and distance and a great map after uploading, just no cadence (I am aware that the speed/cadence sensor does give better speed/distance but I like the ease of using the device on all my bikes without having to buy and pair extra sensors). As far as GPS signal, I turn it on and set in a ...


1

Cycle Meter is by far my favorite due to its ease of use, functionality (syncs with everything), and support. the company rocks, the app rocks, and it's cheap when compared to an standalone garmin.



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