Hot answers tagged

43

The short answer is: not that difficult. The long answer requires some explanation. The equations of motion for a rider on a bicycle are well-understood if not always well-known. The power needed to propel a bicycle on firm flat ground (as on a velodrome) varies approximately with the cube of speed. Thus, to double your speed, you would need to increase ...


24

Always "riding your hardest" is called "junk miles" because it is not possible to always ride your hardest. The biggest performance gains come from more targeted and disciplined riding (as suggested by mattnz). To climb your steep hills (I assume these are relatively short, steep climbs, not a mountain pass) you need to work on developing high power over ...


12

Boardman used what is known as the "Superman" position, as shown in this image. This position has been deemed to be against the rules by the UCI. Compare it to the position that Wiggins had on the bike, shown here. His arms are not as outstretched, and therefore it is not as aerodynamic. The superman position was first used in the hour record attempt ...


12

I think the terms used here are a bit confused. Rather than saying that a road bike has 22 "gears", you should be saying that it has 22 "speeds" (or more correctly, as pointed out in the comments, "gear ratios" is the technically correct most accurate term (when people say 'gear', they are using it as short for 'gear ratios')). Even that can be a bit ...


12

I get the impression when you hit the road its full out 110% effort for the length of the ride. I would suggest from the "lungs burning" description that you are over training and exercising above your anaerobic threshold. You don;t say how often or how far you ride. First up - your cadence is way too low and you risk damaging you knees. Go for a series ...


9

Time for some Pee You need to consider PACING yourself. Use something like strava to log your rides and see your improvements over time, because it never feels like you're getting faster at the time. I did a hill last weekend in 8 minutes that used to take me 15 minutes, 9 months ago. Didn't feel like it at the time. PEERS - riding alone is nice and quiet ...


9

Riding at 30kph average for 3 hours, in a hilly area is a solid effort. Assuming your pack riding skills are sufficient, you will also likely do fine in in a club ride that averages 30-40kph (but see the pack riding primer below). Club rides will have a faster pace than what you are riding now, but you will also be working a lot less (about 30% less) at any ...


9

No - Struggling away in the small rear cog/large front chainring combo is bad. Fitness is an overall term that has many components, so: If you want power you need to work on intervals, which is as fast as possible at full power for short burst times, then recovery time at a middling state. If you want to train for endurance, being at the steady state for ...


8

As Blam and Batman have already suggested you will not go faster. The main reason is that your top speed is determined by the number of teeth on the smallest rear cog. The smallest cog available on a normal cluster / cassette has 11 teeth. If your smallest cog already has 11 teeth, then you will definitely not go faster with a new one. If it currently ...


8

According to BikeCalculator, assuming you drop 10 kg while everything else remains the same (power output, etc.), you would travel 0.3 km/hr faster over a 50 km ride, on the average. In other words, at 100 kg, assuming an average power output of 150 Watts, you'd average 27.54 km/hr over a 50km ride if you weighed 100 kg; doing the same ride at the same 150 ...


7

Everything is relative. For 99% of the population 30kph for 3 hours would be amazing. For a male A grade club rider it would be an off day. For a female A grade club rider it's not bad for a solo training ride. About bunches Sometimes an ad hoc bunch forms in a popular road. These can be dangerous - you don't know the experience level of these people, ...


5

Shimano has a pretty good track record of wear parts availability for older groupsets. I am using 8-speed myself, and there are several European mail order stores as well as local shops that have spare cassettes and chains. I would expect that 9-speed spare parts aren't going away either. The problem with off-road groups is that rear derailleurs are not ...


4

This is a partial answer: Given that the WH-RS10 isn't a fancy wheel, if you can't just get a 11 speed freehub body, you're going to be best off economically by just replacing the whole rear wheel if you want to go 11 speed. I suspect there isn't a replacement to 11 speed, but you can ask your bike shop or someone else may answer there is. Interestingly, ...


4

No, the ideal is to keep up a constant high cadence rather than to apply maximum pressure. Gears were invented for just that reason. Explanation: Muscles work better and develop better under lower strain. The evacuation of waste (lactic acid) is blocked when the muscle is under higher load.


4

Short answer: you multiply the number of front chainrings by the number of cogs at the back. That bike with two chainrings and 11 cogs on the cassette has 2x11 gears = 22, rather than just 11. Bike Gears Explained has lots more detail and this diagram: You can see that for each of the three chainrings every cog on the back can be used. In this case that ...


4

If you want to go 9 speed, you'll need a Shimano-compatible 9 speed shifter for the rear (i.e. the right shifter). You'll also want a 9 speed chain. Your hub should be fine for the cassette swap. And the 9 speed cassette, of course. In terms of how much faster you should go, possibly none. You really need to keep up a good cadence most likely and you'd be ...


3

If you are gong to upgrade might as well go to 10 speed. I think 8, 9, and 10 are compatible. Sheldon You would also need to switch out the shifter. If top gear is the same it will not make the bike go faster. You just have two more gears between the lowest and highest. Is it a good idea? No it is not worth the cost.


2

No. The Tour De France currently has an average speed of about 40km/h, fasted speeds are a team time trial, about 58km/h over 25km. (Wikipedia), average cyclist would be with 1/2 those speeds, average person probably half again. These speeds, while impressive, are well below what I would consider "highway speeds", and the bikes they rode , while expensive ...


2

Whether your numbers are descent depend on who will answer. I've never riden road so I find those numbers descent, but some people who ride road may tell you that those numbers are mediocre. If you want to find out how you compare against others (and your self) in parts of that ride I suggest that you start using strava. Used wiselly it's a great tool for ...


2

I like this one as it supports multiple parameters It is a calculator and a chart BikeCalc Multiply speed by time to get distance 12 mph X 1.5 hours = 18 miles


2

Sheldon Brown's gear calculator shows you speed at certain cadences (in multiples of 20 rpm) as a function of chainring size, cassette size, crank length and wheel size. For what its worth, most people should be using a cadence in the 70-90 rpm, so you're on the lower end.


2

Average speed is a useful measure for estimating your arrival time. It's a simpler calculation (see other answers). It is possible to estimate the effort involved in a ride, taking into account the elevation gained. See http://www.cptips.com/formul2.htm Most competitive cycling sees winners as those who completed the course in the shortest time, which is ...


1

30 cadence is too low and will tend to fatigue the legs more. Pick a lower gear. You don't need to be a pro to climb like a pro. And there are other videos on youtube. As for getting better at climbing - climb more (and at a higher cadence).


1

You will need a pre-2000 rear derailleur as the cable pull ratio was changed in MY2001 and the lever / rear derailleur movement artio, if you use a current 9/10s RD will not give you accurate indexing. You can use and front derailleur from Campagnolo describing itself as "9/10s" compatible but you may find that you need to set it up with more care as the ...


1

This is exactly the case where Wikipedia comes in handy, here are some quotes from the article on 3D printing with metals: Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is an additive manufacturing technique that uses a laser as the power source to sinter powdered material (typically metal), aiming the laser automatically at points in space defined by a 3D ...


1

This is how. An engineer explains: Basically, it's a layering process. Layer by layer, the 3D printer lays down a thin sheet of powdered titanium and a laser melts and fuses that titanium where the part needs to be. It starts at the bottom and works up. When it's all done, you simply remove the unfused titanium and voila, a ...


1

If cornering is the primary issue I will offer the following advice: look thru the turn to where you to be when you exit use your brakes BEFORE you turn; enter the turn at the speed you want to hit the apex and accelerate out keep mass over the center of the bike; don't lean into the turn practice turning on dirt until you slide or fall; cyclocross skills ...



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