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12

Boardman used what is known as the "Superman" position, as shown in this image. This position has been deemed to be against the rules by the UCI. Compare it to the position that Wiggins had on the bike, shown here. His arms are not as outstretched, and therefore it is not as aerodynamic. The superman position was first used in the hour record attempt ...


11

TLDR - Weight training is the wrong activity for improving both your sustained speed (26-30kph) and your 1-minute speed (40kph). Read below to understand why. Background There are three main types of skeletal muscles: slow twitch (type 1), fast oxidative (type 2 a) and fast glycolytic (type 2 b). Your make up of the three types determined primarily by ...


8

The differences are quite significant from race to race - each track is different. Also events such as Rampage are not too much about speed. The top speed may vary between 55-65km/h on tracks such as Mount Sainte Anne up to around 80km/h in Pietermaritzburg which is known for high speeds achieved. Of course all assuming good weather. Also these speeds are ...


8

I'm not sure that anyone is going to be able to give you a definitive answer... especially since you are asking if your commute will improve by 30 seconds when the commute time you give has a range of 60 seconds. But 30 seconds out of 17.5 minutes is about a 2-3% improvement, which seems reasonable... The more interesting question would be "what can this ...


8

As Blam and Batman have already suggested you will not go faster. The main reason is that your top speed is determined by the number of teeth on the smallest rear cog. The smallest cog available on a normal cluster / cassette has 11 teeth. If your smallest cog already has 11 teeth, then you will definitely not go faster with a new one. If it currently ...


7

Riding at 30kph average for 3 hours, in a hilly area is a solid effort. Assuming your pack riding skills are sufficient, you will also likely do fine in in a club ride that averages 30-40kph (but see the pack riding primer below). Club rides will have a faster pace than what you are riding now, but you will also be working a lot less (about 30% less) at any ...


7

Everything is relative. For 99% of the population 30kph for 3 hours would be amazing. For a male A grade club rider it would be an off day. For a female A grade club rider it's not bad for a solo training ride. About bunches Sometimes an ad hoc bunch forms in a popular road. These can be dangerous - you don't know the experience level of these people, ...


5

I think this is kind of a non-question. You want the helmet that rides the fastest? For anything "fastest", either components or kit, just look at what the professional riders are using. This seems to imply that you either wear a regular-design lid (albeit one which is very light, very ventilated, and probably very expensive). Or, you go for a time-trial ...


4

Aerodynamics of a helmet cannot be considered in isolation but rather how it affects aerodynamics when on the rider. The fastest helmet choice for one rider won't necessarily be the fastest for another, it's quite an individual thing. I've done many, many aero tests of helmets on rider, and am often surprised at the combination that proves best. In general ...


4

If you want to go 9 speed, you'll need a Shimano-compatible 9 speed shifter for the rear (i.e. the right shifter). You'll also want a 9 speed chain. Your hub should be fine for the cassette swap. And the 9 speed cassette, of course. In terms of how much faster you should go, possibly none. You really need to keep up a good cadence most likely and you'd be ...


3

If you are gong to upgrade might as well go to 10 speed. I think 8, 9, and 10 are compatible. Sheldon You would also need to switch out the shifter. If top gear is the same it will not make the bike go faster. You just have two more gears between the lowest and highest. Is it a good idea? No it is not worth the cost.


3

What is your "cadence" (number of pedal revolutions per minute)? A healthy young cyclist should be able to "cruise" at 80-90 rpm, and that would be considered your top speed. If at 80 rpm you're only getting 18kmph (11mph) in your fastest gear then your bike gearing is quite low and you probably need to change something. But many novice cyclists simply ...


3

The factors that affect bike efficiency are: Weight Mechanical power train Losses Aerodynamic Drag Rolling resistance For a touring bike, the difference between a folding and regular bike are all lost in the noise. Smaller wheels tend to have higher rolling resistance and the bike might be a bit heavier, but for touring it just doesn't matter that much. ...


3

Bigger tires, bigger chainrings and a smaller cassette all lead to a higher gearing (the crank arm lengths among other things also come into this, but that encapsulates into bike fit). Bigger tires are subject to frame clearance and feeling squirmy possibly. Bigger chain rings require front derailleur compatibility. Smaller cassette also requires ...


3

Do you see any fat profession bicycle riders? Do fat riders pass you more than skinny riders? Rather than try and redefine the art maybe go with established best practices. Cadence of 80+ should keep you on the seat on anything other than a hill or sprint. 10 more lbs is not going to make you sprint or climb better. 48/11 at 30 kph is a cadence of 60. ...


3

There are now "sprinters" helmets that are bit in between TT helmets and regular bike helmets. Giro Air Attack is a good example. There are even some pro riders using them in TT stages.


2

Other answer is good - I got pulled away before I could finish this post I have nice day bike and a rainy day bike and they have less difference than those two bikes and pick up more than 30 seconds on the about the same commute even rainy bike on a nice day Factors: Overall bike weight Aerodynamics The drop bars reduce wind resistance More efficient ...


2

I am trying to understand the physics of bike weight. I have just made a switch from an 11Kg road bike to an 8Kg one (obviously there are many more factors and differences between the 2 bikes other than weight), and have noticed the benefit of reduced weight. However I am not sure I understand it. ..So you haven't noticed a difference due to weight at all. ...


2

The premise of the question is flawed in that you relate force directly to power your push on pedals pushs your body upwards so the max amount of force or push that can be applied on the pedals is equivalent to your body weight As @Blam said - Your cadence is too low. When it comes to engines power = torque*revs. With cycling, torque is limited by ...


2

From the web site that bike comes with 40T chainring and a 14-28T Freewheel. 17.94 kmph is a cadence of only 50. bikecalc.com You should be up at 80+. On a sprint you should go over 100. A folding bike is not as efficient as most full size bike but gearing is not what is holding you back at 18 kmph. Not going to give specific hybrids but there are many ...


2

No. The Tour De France currently has an average speed of about 40km/h, fasted speeds are a team time trial, about 58km/h over 25km. (Wikipedia), average cyclist would be with 1/2 those speeds, average person probably half again. These speeds, while impressive, are well below what I would consider "highway speeds", and the bikes they rode , while expensive ...


2

Whether your numbers are descent depend on who will answer. I've never riden road so I find those numbers descent, but some people who ride road may tell you that those numbers are mediocre. If you want to find out how you compare against others (and your self) in parts of that ride I suggest that you start using strava. Used wiselly it's a great tool for ...


2

I like this one as it supports multiple parameters It is a calculator and a chart BikeCalc Multiply speed by time to get distance 12 mph X 1.5 hours = 18 miles


2

Sheldon Brown's gear calculator shows you speed at certain cadences (in multiples of 20 rpm) as a function of chainring size, cassette size, crank length and wheel size. For what its worth, most people should be using a cadence in the 70-90 rpm, so you're on the lower end.


1

This is exactly the case where Wikipedia comes in handy, here are some quotes from the article on 3D printing with metals: Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is an additive manufacturing technique that uses a laser as the power source to sinter powdered material (typically metal), aiming the laser automatically at points in space defined by a 3D ...


1

This is how. An engineer explains: Basically, it's a layering process. Layer by layer, the 3D printer lays down a thin sheet of powdered titanium and a laser melts and fuses that titanium where the part needs to be. It starts at the bottom and works up. When it's all done, you simply remove the unfused titanium and voila, a ...


1

But you don't have the same transmission as the wheels are part of the transmission. Smaller wheels are not as efficient - more rolling resistance. You also need to send more chain which is not as efficient. You don't have the same position and lack multiple positions offered by drop bars. The frame is not as rigid and absorbs pedal energy. In the end ...


1

The 'best' is fairly subjective and probably not compatible with lightest. For what it's worth I remember reading somewhere that the Edge 510 is widely used through the pro peloton. I use a Garmin Edge 810 and would recommend it in an instant but it is possibly bigger than it needs to be if you're very worried about weight and size (I chose it for its ...


1

You will need a pre-2000 rear derailleur as the cable pull ratio was changed in MY2001 and the lever / rear derailleur movement artio, if you use a current 9/10s RD will not give you accurate indexing. You can use and front derailleur from Campagnolo describing itself as "9/10s" compatible but you may find that you need to set it up with more care as the ...


1

The following is junk science: Dynamic friction on moving surfaces comes into play - I'd put $ on it that the 8kg has better quality components and therefore bearing than the 11kg bike..... Nothing to do with weight, but in cycling weight and quality is inextricably linked Mechanical losses in a bike powertrain are tiny - and when you're running fast on ...



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