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43

The short answer is: not that difficult. The long answer requires some explanation. The equations of motion for a rider on a bicycle are well-understood if not always well-known. The power needed to propel a bicycle on firm flat ground (as on a velodrome) varies approximately with the cube of speed. Thus, to double your speed, you would need to increase ...


29

Disclaimer: I am a fixie hater. I'll try to answer this as if I was impartial. Proper road bikes (Including the Moulton) are the machines for speed, and always have been (unless you're on a velodrome). Looking at it through a speed lens, a fixie has a slight weight, aero, and drivetrain efficiency advantage over a road bike, but this usually doesn't come ...


24

Always "riding your hardest" is called "junk miles" because it is not possible to always ride your hardest. The biggest performance gains come from more targeted and disciplined riding (as suggested by mattnz). To climb your steep hills (I assume these are relatively short, steep climbs, not a mountain pass) you need to work on developing high power over ...


15

Who rides fixes? Roadies who have got bored with always being out the front? Maybe its someone wanting to make a statement to the "Freds" (look it up) in the group I once did a 160km ride where some guy on a MTB (with nobbiles, back in the mid 1990's steel, 26" etc) arrived home 00:04:35 behind the leading pack (About 4:10 hours). Some argued the only ...


12

I get the impression when you hit the road its full out 110% effort for the length of the ride. I would suggest from the "lungs burning" description that you are over training and exercising above your anaerobic threshold. You don;t say how often or how far you ride. First up - your cadence is way too low and you risk damaging you knees. Go for a series ...


12

I think the terms used here are a bit confused. Rather than saying that a road bike has 22 "gears", you should be saying that it has 22 "speeds" (or more correctly, as pointed out in the comments, "gear ratios" is the technically correct most accurate term (when people say 'gear', they are using it as short for 'gear ratios')). Even that can be a bit ...


11

As long as you are moving through the air, aerodynamic drag will account for some portion of total drag. Here is a plot that shows the relative contribution of aerodynamic drag vs. rolling drag on total drag for a rider at constant speed on a flat surface with the given CdA (drag area) and Crr (coefficient of rolling resistance). There is no magic threshold ...


10

No - Struggling away in the small rear cog/large front chainring combo is bad. Fitness is an overall term that has many components, so: If you want power you need to work on intervals, which is as fast as possible at full power for short burst times, then recovery time at a middling state. If you want to train for endurance, being at the steady state for ...


9

According to BikeCalculator, assuming you drop 10 kg while everything else remains the same (power output, etc.), you would travel 0.3 km/hr faster over a 50 km ride, on the average. In other words, at 100 kg, assuming an average power output of 150 Watts, you'd average 27.54 km/hr over a 50km ride if you weighed 100 kg; doing the same ride at the same 150 ...


9

Time for some Pee You need to consider PACING yourself. Use something like strava to log your rides and see your improvements over time, because it never feels like you're getting faster at the time. I did a hill last weekend in 8 minutes that used to take me 15 minutes, 9 months ago. Didn't feel like it at the time. PEERS - riding alone is nice and quiet ...


8

You have a specific training question that your coach ought to be able to answer for you, and I will not address that here. A larger general issue is one that I will address, since it is of wider interest. Your general concern is that you won't be able to simulate race conditions in training, especially long steady output. However, speed is determined by ...


7

Average speed is a useful measure for estimating your arrival time. It's a simpler calculation (see other answers). It is possible to estimate the effort involved in a ride, taking into account the elevation gained. See http://www.cptips.com/formul2.htm Most competitive cycling sees winners as those who completed the course in the shortest time, which is ...


6

I agree totally with comments and answers given here, but you forgot the most important thing: LEGS. I guess the 55km/h guy is also comfortable with a bike with some more kg and even with a no so wrong gear setup. I mean no offense but I would bet that this guy does more km per year than you, in this way you can sell, buy as many bikes as you want that ...


6

Engineer and fixed gear rider here, hello. My top speed on flat on fixed is 1 km/h less than on geared bike with similar wheels, and I'd explain that with my geared bike having lower handlebars. On level ground, a single speed bike, fixed or not, does not have any performance penalty compared to a geared bike. On the contrary, singlespeed has slightly less ...


6

Schwalbe has a great chart from their rolling resistance page on major resistance force for bicycling. Noticeable air drag started from 15km/h and increase exponential after 20km/h. At 10Mph(16Kmh), good aero bikes doesn't show significant advantages. Even above 30km/h, typical aero bike cannot do much to reduce the air resistant : human are not ...


5

It's really simple, gravity/weight moves you forward, and drag/friction keeps you from going fast. He can't do much about the weight difference, short of drinking more beer or getting a heavier bike. But drag and friction is a different story. There are many things slowing you and your buddy down, the largest factor being wind resistance. Wind resistance ...


5

Based (very roughly) on this calculator here, I'll guess 28 km/h or less. Using a 0 weight rider and bike with no wind and 200 watt output you get roughly the speed you are getting on the trainer (the weights are used for rolling resistance). Leaving the power the same and changing to 80kgs, a 9kg bike and 15 km/h wind it gives 28 km/h which is a ...


5

Shimano has a pretty good track record of wear parts availability for older groupsets. I am using 8-speed myself, and there are several European mail order stores as well as local shops that have spare cassettes and chains. I would expect that 9-speed spare parts aren't going away either. The problem with off-road groups is that rear derailleurs are not ...


4

Short answer: you multiply the number of front chainrings by the number of cogs at the back. That bike with two chainrings and 11 cogs on the cassette has 2x11 gears = 22, rather than just 11. Bike Gears Explained has lots more detail and this diagram: You can see that for each of the three chainrings every cog on the back can be used. In this case that ...


4

No, the ideal is to keep up a constant high cadence rather than to apply maximum pressure. Gears were invented for just that reason. Explanation: Muscles work better and develop better under lower strain. The evacuation of waste (lactic acid) is blocked when the muscle is under higher load.


4

This is a partial answer: Given that the WH-RS10 isn't a fancy wheel, if you can't just get a 11 speed freehub body, you're going to be best off economically by just replacing the whole rear wheel if you want to go 11 speed. I suspect there isn't a replacement to 11 speed, but you can ask your bike shop or someone else may answer there is. Interestingly, ...


4

For context, I have been doing group rides for about 20 years now, raced at the cat 1/2 level for a good portion of that, and had a fixed gear obsession off and on for many years too. Riding fixed is an interesting challenge, but it is most certainly not an out and out advantage. The short of it is that your 55 kph fellow is likely a strong rider, who also ...


4

My £1500 bike was stolen about 3 years ago, and since this was the 3rd or 4th bike to get nicked in London (during the day!), I decided having an expensive bike was simply not fun any more, and instead bought a cheap and cheerful £400 fixie. Surprisingly, I am significantly faster on the fixie, and there are a few reasons why: The fixie weights practically ...


4

Clipless pedals are a matter of preference - you don't have to use them. There are alternatives such as "half clips" which might suit you better. I've come to like mine, with mtb shoes and pedals that are designed to be rideable with clipless or normal shoes on either side. These allow you to ride in an alternative position (with the pedal under the arch ...


3

There are a lot of factors that go into your speed and efficiency, and this switch touches several of them: Rider Position: Typically, a bike with touring geometry will have a slightly longer wheelbase, and lower bottom bracket. Along with other geometry tweeks, the result is that on a touring bike you are likely to be in a slightly more upright position, ...


2

Another point to consider - confidence. I had a washout on a road, which lead to a slide on a downhill ~4 months ago, which ended up off the road and down a hill. I am now much more leery of turns at speed, to the point I brake down to a slow speed and coast through any leaning part of the curve, only applying pedals again when exiting the corner. So, ...


2

Your technology is up to date. 53x12 is basically still the standard for road bikes today. If you want to increase the gearing, your best bet would be to install an 11x cassette, if not a Sram 10x. That said... If you are regularly finding your 53x12 too low it means one of three things: You are mashing (standing up in a heavy gear) instead of spinning (...


2

An 11 speed rear cassette gives you more linear gaps between gears. It doesn't necessarily give you higher or lower gears. There are bigger chainrings than 53 tooth, but they're rare, expensive, and tend to be single-speed track bikes. There are smaller cassettes than 12 tooth, 11 is the lowest you can get normally, and some folding bikes can go down to 9 ...


1

Keeping your feet in one position is important when you want to use all your power to pedal in the most efficient way, or you want your feet to be stable on the pedals, because you tackle some hard stuff and your feet tend to move from their position without you wanting it. For you, you use your bike for commuting, which means you have to swing around to ...


1

I'm going to let you answer your own question - Think how tired you are after an hour on the spin bike, and compare that with how tired you are after an hour on the road bike. Work in some fudge factors based on the amount of headwind/tailwind you had (ride out and back on the same route) Number of stops for traffic lights or road signs... getting going ...



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