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15

Tyre lever (in the UK anyway - WP redirects that to tire iron but to me that sounds more like metal fatigue. After all, they're not made of iron).


15

Spokes break for the same reason any other material does: they are subject to stresses they are unable to withstand. In the case of a wheel, it can be overloaded by rider weight, cargo, or forceful impacts. Additionally, the presence of loose spokes results in other, properly tensioned spokes bearing more of the wheel's load. Spokes are under tension, so ...


14

The short answer is, "Find a dealer you trust." Whether what he told you is right or wrong, you clearly believe he is having you on. That will not result in a good relationship, no matter whether he is scamming you, or not. Most likely, he is either poorly educated on the cause of the spokes breaking, and is having difficulty explaining something to you ...


13

The "Lunartic Cycle" Here you go: http://www.yankodesign.com/2010/08/13/no-spokes-cycle/ Complete with movie. As for your extra reading material: http://bicycledesign.net/ Hope that helps!


12

You will need one special tool: a spoke wrench that fits the size of spokes you have. While a truing stand is great, you can do some basic truing of a bike with rim brake by simply putting the bike on a stand. Spin the wheel slowly and watch the space between the rim and the brake pad. When you have found the center of a an area that is listing to one ...


10

Probably the best source for answering this is Jobst Brandt's The Bicycle Wheel, the definitive text on the wire-spoked wheel and an essential for anyone interested in the art of wheelbuilding. Excerpted from page 68 of the 3rd edition: Spokes in a crossed pattern are usually interlaced at their last crossing before reaching the rim. Spokes coming from ...


10

Yes, as the comments pointed out, this is abnormal. I would make the attempt to take the wheel back to the LBS where you bought the bike. The might be able to work with Specialized and get the wheel replaced completely. Once at the LBS, have the mechanic inspect for any external factors (derailleur strikes, etc). If they can't get it replaced, then I would ...


9

Yep, there are various types of spokes, as already explained. There are also various ways of "lacing" the spokes, and various spoke counts. When picking a spoke lacing scheme, there are six basic considerations: Strength Flexibility Torque resistance Air resistance Weight Appearance/sex/stupidly spending money Strength is determined by the number of ...


9

A wheel is only as strong as the tension on the spokes. If the wheel was loose for any significant length of time before you noticed it, the spokes will fatigue very quickly, because they are flexing through a range of motion which is not intended. You are a big guy at 95 Kg, so this type of problem is not unusual (as am I). That means that you need to be ...


9

Lower spoke numbers are primarily of interest to weight weenies (though for a given price, a lower spoke wheel will probably use a heavier rim offsetting the spoke reduction weight savings). As usual, Sheldon is some good reading. There is also a whole book on how to build wheels well and design decisions, by Jobst Brandt, called "The Bicycle Wheel". What ...


8

The basic arrangement for cross-laced spokes is thus: Spoke Length = sqrt[ (RRSP - (HSR * cos(SAA)))^2 + HFO^2 - (HSR * cos(SAA))^2 ] For radial (straight) spokes, the formula is simpler: Spoke Length = sqrt[ (RRSP - HSR)^2 + HFO^2 ] RRSP (Rim Radius plus Spoke Penetration) is half of the Effective Rim Diameter given by the manufacturer plus 2mm for ...


8

That depends on how good your ear is. If you can tune a stringed instrument effectively, then tensioning a wheel by ear is very effective. Identical spokes that have the same pitch when plucked should have the same tension within the margin of error for any tensiometer reading. The catch is you need a tensiometer to get the relative tone for the proper kg/f ...


7

I can't comment on doing a whole wheel this way, but I have seen wheel repairs done this way while touring. It did not work, I suspect for the reason that Jobst points out. The nipples unwound after a few days (at about 100km/day with perhaps 100kg load). Doing the spokes up tighter just broke spokes and stripped nipples. The mutual tensioning effect is IMO ...


7

Yeah, by the time you have five spokes broken it may be that only one more and it'll collapse (depending on exactly how the broken spokes are arranged). Plus with that many gone the others are under much more serious stress. In the general case you may have a spoke go now and then and, if you replace it reasonably promptly, it doesn't imply any serious ...


7

Check the spokes - its likely one or more has broken ("I felt a shock, like a snap....".). The ones to check are ones that got from the rim, where the rubbing is occurring, to the hub on the opposite side of the rubbing (in your case, the right side of the hub). If these have let go, there is nothing stopping the rim being pulled to the left. It may be ...


7

The rim manufacturer should have this information. It depends a lot on the number of spokes, if the holes have eyelets (metal grommets) and the material of the rim. Lower spoke count wheels need more tension. Generally eyeleted wheels can handle more tension. As for symmetrical tension, that also depends. If the wheel is asymmetrical then your tension ...


6

The best suggestion I can make is to read "The Art of Wheelbuilding, by Gerd Schraner". As for materials: Use aluminum, double walled rims. They are stronger, lighter, and believe it or not easier for a new wheel builder to get true and round than steel rims will be. In addition, steel rims for a road bike will be difficult to come by in new condition. ...


6

In his book 'The bicycle wheel' Jobst Brandt, says that double butted spokes will be more resistant to fatigue failure when built into a wheel. This is because spokes break because of the cyclic stress they suffer as the wheel rotates. As the spoke rotates thru the bottom of the wheel it experiences a reduction in tension. Butted spokes are more ...


6

There are a lot of Chinese parts on the market as well as Taiwanese parts but then again, that could be said about any product that is sold in the US these days. Plus, quality of Chinese and Taiwanese parts are respectable for the most part. I would suspect that the real problem is how the wheel is being built and/or how it is being used. I have come across ...


6

Here is my 2c from over 10 years experience in a busy shop: I am assuming that it is the spokes are breaking at the hub. On a drive side wheel, that is where they always break. There is a different rare condition, when the spoke nipples are breaking off at the rim. Rims have two sets of holes, one set on the each side. The spokes might be laced to the ...


6

Place a single leading spoke and a single trailing spoke- both on the same side of the hub- to get your placement correct. That way you only have to unthread two spokes if you're off. Once you've got it right, unthread the leading spoke if you're planning on lacing trailing first or vice versa and proceed as normal with lacing.


5

The basic tool you would need is a spoke wrench. This will allow you to pull the rim (by the spokes) back into true. The spoke wrench is actually turning the spoke nipple out at the rim. The tool you would need in order to tell if it is true is a truing stand. The tool you will need to make it all work is your brain. =-]


5

There is now an entry in the Terminology Index for tire levers.


5

Jobst Brandt's definitive text "The Bicycle Wheel" has this to say on spoke tensioning: With tensioned wires as spokes, the wheel can support loads only to the point where its spokes become loose. At this point the wheel will collapse. Therefore, for greatest strength, spokes must be as tight as the rim permits. Structurally the rim supports spoke tension ...


5

Generally, repeated issues with broken spokes indicates either damage to the rim, meaning that the metal hoop of the rim is physically bent while under no tension, or that the spokes are at the end of their fatigue life. Any wheel has an expected use life, and usually, you will wear a track in the aluminum rim from braking forces before the fatigue life of ...


5

This is debatable, but since you asked, here go my cents: A wheel has three "parts": rim, hub and spokes. Spokes have two functions: Sustain the vertical forces on the wheel (weight of the rider, landing, etc.); Transmit torque while accelerating (rear wheel only) and braking; Any properly laced wheel will do it, but there are many ways to design the ...


5

I think radial spokes are generally recommended only for front wheels, because they're weaker than normally-laced wheels especially under the asymmetric torsion applied to the rear wheel. WRT the drive forces: trailing spokes are necessary to transmit the drive force from the hub to the rim; radial spokes would make this transmission very spongy as the hub ...


5

The wheel is going to break or get so out of true it will be unrideable.How long it will take depends on how many are left how hard you ride and the condition of the other spokes.


5

If you haven't hit anything and you haven't parked your bike on a busy bike rack (other tires getting accidentally rammed into your spokes), the most likely culprit is a nipple vibrating loose. You can see if this is a likely possibility fairly easily...one, maybe two, of your spokes will be noticeably loose...less tension then the surrounding spokes ...


5

"Burrs on the hub" sounds bogus to me. Could be the case with a new hub, but burrs would be worn away with use. It seems most likely that the hub was reassembled by "unskilled labor" (the new/careless guy in the shop) and he didn't notice that the hub holes are directional -- there is a countersink on one side of the hole and not the other -- or didn't ...



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