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8

Rollers. You have three drums, two at the back, one at the front and the front roller is powered by one of the back rollers. You can also get add ons to give you a breeze: Balance is what is needed to stay on the rollers, also a wall (as per featured video) comes in handy. Rollers are used for training purposes although they can also be used for ...


4

How long do you have? How strong is your motivation? How good are the bikes? Unfortunately, most exercise bikes have a very poor "simulated feel", and a real cyclist tires of them pretty quickly. This is especially true of the old friction bikes and many of the wind and magnetic trainers. A few (Expresso bikes, and some of the newer Le Monde bikes that ...


3

This really depends on the type of stationary bike you are talking about. There's the older style as well as bikes that resemble road bikes (at least in terms of body position), as well as some recumbent bikes. There are bicycles that match pretty well to all three of those stationary bikes. However, it's worth mentioning that just because you are ...


2

Essentially you have got one of these: This is an older type of saddle clamp that was popular when seat posts were made from steel rather than alloy. Any saddle bought from a bike shop will fit. The general idea is that the bolt goes behind instead of in front of the post, you tighten it up on both sides so that the top of the seat is level and the seat ...


2

Yes, rollers. They are excellent for improving form and efficiency. It takes a while to get used to them because as matthew indicated, you really need to actively balance yourself or else you'll tip over. In particular, rollers improve pedaling technique because they force you to be more even in the stroke. If your stroke is not smooth, you'll have a ...


2

The basic answer is that there are many studies that link exercise and brain function. A standing desk will get you off your bum, but a treadmil or cycle desk will get your body moving enough to allow your brain to work better. There is an entire chapter in the book Brain Rules. I have no personal experience with it, but that is the theory.


1

A very significant factor with 99% of stationary bikes is that they have no momentum -- when you stop pedaling the bike stops, and it takes extra effort to resume pedaling, even if you only stopped for an instant. You simply can't reproduce this behavior on a "real world" bike. Beyond that, your basic stationary bikes provide no variability in resistance, ...


1

I have had an under-desk bike for about one month now. I use it continuously at a low resistance while working. So far I've done between 2-3 hours of cycling each day, though I hope to increase that. I'm using a Magne Trainer, which is really easy to assemble but costs a bit more than the cheaper models. It's very quiet and I've had zero problems with it ...


1

There are basically two types of seats: Seats with rails and seats without rails. Seats with rails (two somewhat crooked metal bars running front-to-back under the seat) will fit the clamp in Mathew's photo or any fancier seat clamp. (For fancier ones generally the clamp is permanently attached to the top of the seat post (the part that slides up and ...



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