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1

After disassembling the front assembly, as per Carel's and Davorin Ruševljan's suggestions, I found out that the fork tube (going through the headtube) had a crack in it, which is most probably what was making the creaking noise (see picture below).


0

Are you prioritizing longevity above all else? Because nothing's likely to beat a cheap bike of thickwalled straight-gauge chro-moly steel (which isn't particularly vulnerable to corrosion, especially if you sand and repaint, or apply rust converter to, any nicks in the paint). Lightweight, high-end tubing is more vulnerable to picking up dings, buckling in ...


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Some modern steel frames are ED coated, which inhibit rust on the inside and out. All-City does this with most of their frames, and Surly has started to do this with some new models as well (such as the ECR and straggler). Though in my experience the paint can chip a bit easier, but the ED coating below tends to remain intact. This may be an option if you ...


3

Its not just the material that affects frame longevity, but the design of frames - different tubing thicknesses and geometries will last longer than others given the same materials. That being said, a lot of touring bikes (often made of steel such as Reynolds 521 or the Tange equivalent or something, since in a pinch, you can repair steel in pretty much ...


1

Pull out the stem and remove the bar. Clean the contact surfaces. Grease them with cycle grease and put everything back in place. Don't forget to put grease on the threads of the bolts. Tighten with the required torque.


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This guide from Sheldon Brown may be of use. I'd start with checking out the headset to make sure its tightened down appropriately.


2

With the old style headsets this symptom was generally due to the handlebar slipping slightly inside the reenforcing tube that surrounds the center on most bars. The tube was glued to the bar, and eventually some of the glue would fail, allowing the two to move relative to each other as you rode and the bar flexed. In very rare cases the bar would actually ...


0

In the past I've eliminated sounds such as creaking and popping up front by correctly torquing the stem and handlebar bolts. I guess the bolts were tightened inconsistently and the cause for the noise.


1

It is quite hard to locate origin of sound like that. Since sound comes from critical area, where some of the failures might result in loss of teeth or worse, I would suggest through approach. After eliminating simpler problems like skewers and bolts not tight enough (too much), or bearing issues, I would suggest disassembling whole stem/headset/fork ...



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