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13

You actually need something sticking up above the top of your steer tube. It can be either a spacer or the stem itself. This is because the top cap squeezing down onto the stem/spacer stack is what keeps the headset bearings snugly in their cups. If the top cap is flush with the steer tube, there will be play in the headset which is bad. Park Tools has a ...


12

A shorter stem does make your steering quicker, it also enables you to sit further upright and gives more leverage on the handlebar. The longer stem gets you more forward and in a better position for climbing but I think it makes low speed steering awkward and is uncomfortable for long stretches on the bike. I went from some ungodly long stem (100+mm) with ...


11

I believe that's the logo for Dyno which was acquired by GT in the '80s.


9

No, it would not be particularly safe. The steering would get extremely twitchy and difficult to handle.


8

It sounds as though you are talking about what Sheldon Brown term "reach", which is normally measured center-to-center along the direction of the extension So this does not take into account the angle of the stem, which could reduce the length forward that the handlebars extend by a small amount if they are on a large angle up or down.


8

For quill stems, you can use a rubber cement to glue a ball-bearing into the socket on the stem bolt, making it so you can't get at it with an allen key. You'd obviously want to use a glue that can be removed with a solvent, so that you'd be able to do regular service.


7

I'm going to recommend that you NOT do this. There were in the past manufacturers of 1" steerer suspension forks - though I'm not certain that they're are still sold. It is important to note that bicycle frames built to accept solid steel forks have different geometry than those built for suspension forks. The frame is designed for a fork that doesn't have ...


7

That's scary, you shouldn't be able to do that. It sounds as though you can straighten it easily too. If you straddle the front wheel facing backwards can you twist the bars in the fork easily? If so, definitely tighten it up. Firmly. You should not be able to move that! Who put the bike together? If it's new, take it back and talk to the owner of the ...


7

Measure the handlebar itself, while unmounted from the bike, at the center most point of the bar. Use a digital or vernier scale caliper. The bar from the 2009 Bianchi Cortina is a 25.4mm MTB handlebar, with about 2 inches of rise. I expect yours will be as well. Do not use a 26mm bar, although you can likely mount it on the stem, because the installation ...


7

No, the clamp that mounts to the steerer is not a standard height. There will be slight differences in the stack height of the clamp itself between different makes and models of stems that can typically be accommodated for with addition or subtraction of a small number of spacers, or the difference may be so slight that you don't have to change your spacers ...


6

There should be no difference, other than the quality of the materials and workmanship. One can clamp just as tightly as the other, and both will be apt to produce the same symptoms if the bar is slightly undersized or too flimsy at the mount point. In both cases, if you do have a slightly-undersized bar you want to keep you can grind down the faces of the ...


6

Any frame can support a range of rider sizes by adjusting (among other things) the seat post and stem. However, as you might suspect, there are compromises to be made. And, there are limits to how big of a rider can fit on a given frame. I'll explain a bit more below to illustrate these points. You can adjust the seat post by making it higher (may ...


6

This is your stem. As you can see, it is the whole unit from the bars to the top of the fork, including the adjustable bit in the middle. Most dan't have this and I think this is where the confusion is coming from. To remove your bars for packing, it is usual to remove the 4 bolts on the face plate on the stem. That is the part immediately touching the ...


5

Assuming the stem was chosen by the manufacturer, it's required torque as printed on the stem should be within the ability of the fork steerer to support. If the stem says,"Max Torque 10Nm" as opposed to just "10Nm" then start with a lower setting around 6Nm and work up slowly until the stem clamp will not slip on the steerer. If only the number is ...


5

As long as you're putting on the same size stem (steer tube size, not length), which you should be doing unless it came with spacers/shims, then yeah no problem. If the clamping area is taller, you may need to get a longer bolt to reach the star nut, but then you'll also have some stem above the steer tube and that's no good either. Odds are though that ...


5

There isn't always one size frame which fits a person well in a given model line of bikes (there may be 2 or more - probably 2 if someones on the border of sizes). In some cases, you can get multiple models to fit by swapping out stems and seatposts and saddle and handlebar adjustments or swaps. However, this is highly dependent on the particular model of ...


4

I measured five quill stems that I have, three steel and two aluminum. The overall lengths vary from 5 1/2 to 6 1/4". The minimum insertion length was 2.5 to 3.0 inches. There was not a consistant ratio of length to minimum insertion. It is possible that the insertion length increased on newer bikes due to safety/liability concerns. If you haven't got at ...


4

Try changing the seat angle. I'm tall as you, and had the same problem. I changed to a bigger frame, but the real solution was to set my seat a bit off the horizontal (back is lower than front). Seat and handlebar are at same height. No more sliding.


4

A problem many hit when trying to straighten the stem is that they end up aligning the stem with the bike while the wheel is almost straight. A degree or two isn't noticeable until you are riding and then it really bothers you. Instead of trying to align three things (bike, stem, wheel), turn the wheel about 45 degrees. Now align the stem (I generally do it ...


4

Have you tried removing the stem so you have better access to the wedge? Often if you do that you can screw the bolt in and pull the wedge out, then reassemble it away from the bike. The other approach is to again lift the stem out, remove the front wheel, then turn the bike over and push the wedge out from the fork side. If you have a front mudguard you ...


3

Changing from 50 to 65 (or the opposite) is definitely noticeable. And depending on your needs, switching may improve your riding. Switching from 50 to 65 will mean more pressure on the front end. That means better cornering (the front end will not wash out easily) and more stability on the downhill. Some people also mention that it'll improve climbing on ...


3

I've heard good things about Atomic 22, and they have a quill stem fastener. I haven't used them myself though, so don't take this as a recommendation, and ask around! The only other vendor I recall hearing about is Pitlock, but like Pinhead I don't think they have a quill product. Otherwise, the ball-bearing + wax or solder method is probably easiest.


3

One additional technique that works quite well is to camouflage your bike by making it look UGLY. Add reflective tape bits everywhere. Leave scratches and scuffs or cover them with a clear or mismatched paint. Put a ratty cover on your saddle. Cover brand names wherever possible. Zip tie junk wherever. Soft beeswax mixed with food coloring and rubbed on ...


3

I suspect you might have either a loose headset or handlebar stem. I would take it back to where you bought it and describe the problem. If it's recently purchased, they would probably fix it under warranty.


3

In the BMX world, they use minimum offset or zero offset necks for flatland. The minimum offset options allow you shorter reach without causing problems being backwards. These are some options (the neck/bar combo might not help, but it was shown as examples of options that exist) In the picture you see a zero offset zero angle bar-neck combo, a minimum ...


3

With most older quill stems, there must be a minimum of one inch of the stem (above the binder wedge) inside the frame for safety. Most stems have marks on them similar to seat posts, yes. The longer the quill, the more of the stem needs to be in the frame. I suggest 25% of the length as a minimum. The scratch marks on the stem in the photo you linked ...


3

I generally wipe whatever greasy or oily rag I have lying around at the shop on any uncoated steer tubes as a habit. We're in a fairly dry area so it's not of great importance. If I was in a wet area I'd use a product called FrameSaver. There is no concern with slippage if the steer tube is greasy.


3

Return the bolt. You need to turn it out only for a half inch, then easily strike it with a hammer. (Don't make a strong strike, to not drive in the quill stem if it rusted!) Usually it will be enough, Yet it can be a little rusted, so hitting with your hand on the handles will help. Sometimes it's very rusted, so you will need to use some oil to deal with ...


3

The answer is trigonometry. Most bikes have a headset angle of about 74°, give or take a degree. Over the adjustment range you're looking at that degree doesn't make a difference. Here, tan(74 degrees) = height change / reach change = ~3.5. So to get a centimetre of reach change to need to lift the stem 3.5cm, putting the stem up reducing the reach. Or you ...



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