Hot answers tagged

28

A small shed seems like the best option if you have space, some insulation inside the shed would help stop condensation. A bike kept outside will rust given enough time, it’s gears etc will also not like being wet all the time. Just as importantly is more likely to get stolen if it is just left outside and I would always rather get on a dry bike then a ...


24

Here's my solution. Take off wheels, pedals, and handlebars, and place the bike under the bed. Ok, that may not be the right solution, but it might point you in the right direction. If you start taking parts off your bike, you can fit it in a pretty small place. You might even want to consider taking parts off and storing everything but the frame inside ...


21

A tarp that fully covers a bike can provide some insulation and keep out precipitation. Don't buy a "bike cover"; they're overpriced, thin, and non-customizable. For an average-sized bike, an 8' by 10' tarp is enough to just reach to the ground. A weight of around 6 oz per square yard, or a thickness of around 8 mils, seems to be ideal (standard tarps are ...


19

Wash it. Dry thoroughly. You can even wax it if you truly love your ride... Lube the chain Lubricate all pivot points (derailleurs, brake handles, etc) Loosen the tension on the cables and put a small amount of grease on the cable ends. If the hubs haven't been overhauled in a while you can do that. Remove the seatpost and if metal apply a light coat of ...


17

Many bike shops, collectors, or racers hang their bicycles by the wheels. The wheels are made to withstand the weight of the rider while going through road bumps. The forces of a hanging bicycle are way less than anything the wheels are designed for. Some very deep aerodynamic rims (say, Campa Bora) might require some special hook with a wider seat. ...


16

Forget the tarp. Ultimately, the greatest danger to your bike is not the weather, it's thieves. As long as you invest in a good lock, practice good locking technique, and don't live in an area full of degenerates you should be fine. My bike is worth more than $1000 and I ride it all over and lock it up outside frequently. When you select your bike, don't ...


16

You'd have to calulate the actual forces to be 100% sure but it's not going to be a problem: forces on front wheel/fork/headset while e.g. just sitting on the bike, braking or landing jumps will be (much) higher than the force applied from hanging it. That being said, I do note at least two problems with this setup: first, good luck getting one of the ...


15

I don't think that this should be a problem. The force that is transferred through the seatpost to the bike when you sit on it and ride some bumpy road is vastly more than the stress that your bike might get from hanging on the bike stand.


14

If the bike was in decent shape when put away, and has not been exposed to the weather, there's probably very little that needs to be done. The tires would be the biggie -- likely they're checked and may need replacement (though not for certain). Inflate them to listed pressure and check the sidewalls for cracks or bulges. Assuming rim brakes, the brake ...


13

A lot will depend on the construction of the helmet. For example the basic material in the helmet will be some sort of sponge or foam which relies on its texture to absorb sudden impacts; does this degrade over time? For example, a loaf of bread gets its texture from the tiny air bubbles formed while rising and proving, but if left to prove too long, the ...


12

Here a few other considerations: Make sure bike is 100% dry Yes oil chain and all other gears, bearings etc... If bike is steel, oil or repaint any exposed metal If bike steel, add nice layer of car wax and buff If bike is carbon, polish with Lemon fresh wood furniture polish If saddle is leather polish'er up with some mink oil or other leather conditioner ...


12

Wrapping with plastic for a season will result in trapping moisture, instead of keeping it out. Moisture will penetrate unless you do something extreme like vacuum-sealing (which isn't practical in this case). You're better off making sure the bike is well-covered to keep off precipitation, but can also breathe to allow excess moisture to evaporate. ...


10

If by "parallel to the wall" you mean in the same direction as it would sit if it were leaning against the wall then you would probably do well with a rack like I bought when I moved into an apartment last year: This Delta Michelangelo Rack holds two bikes, requires only a single small screw hole in the wall to anchor, and does a good job of holding the ...


10

Your local bike store (LBS) can be an expensive solution in search of problems, if you follow my meaning. Let me clarify: a few years ago I bought a mid-1980's vintage mountain bike which I intended to use for basically the same purpose the OP described. It cost me $20 at a garage sale. It had been a few years since I had been on a bike, so though I once ...


10

To answer the Kvartal question: no, but in practice if you don't have studs it will be fragile and over time you're likely to pull the screws loose or right out of the wall. If the rack doesn't match up with your studs use a backing board attached to studs and you'll be fine - even a length of 1x4" timber would probably be enough. Don't use any of the ...


10

To add to Michael's comment if it's your property you can't be forbid to bring a bicycle into your apartment, unless it's somehow unlawful to be in possession of said bicycle. Would you be forbid to bring a crank set or a pair of wheels or a bar set into your apartment? Why would you be forbid to bring those things assembled in a certain way into your ...


9

Doesn't really matter. Just try to avoid really wet places. I have left bikes in the garage for years. Or for months at a time between rides. (Road bike during the winter, while I ride my MTB to work, and vica versa). I have left them standing on the floor. Hanging from both wheels in the ceiling. I recall a thread on hanging from just the front wheel ...


9

The cold won't hurt it -- foam is used to line refrigerators. And certainly if the temp is going "all the way down" to 40F (shudder!) that's not even close to a problem -- around here it isn't even "cold" unless the temp is below zero F. (In general, solid objects are not damaged by cold, though they do often become more brittle while cold and hence more ...


9

It might even be better than standing it on the same patch of tyres, if it's not being ridden at all, especially if you're not checking the tyre pressures.


9

It is hard to beat a “Sheffield” stand, as they make it easy to lock the bike and don’t bend your wheels if the bike is knocked over. Cambridge Cycling Campaign did a good write up on the options.


9

No, there are no problems with doing this. Bike shops frequently hang bikes in a similar way. And when I lived in small house in the inner city, I hung all of the family bikes in a similar way for years, without observing any problems. It's remarkably easy to get the bike up onto the hook or peg, when you learn how. Those in the picture don't look as ...


8

Just make sure you give it a good once-over when you take it out to ride again. Make sure there's no rust and that everything that should be tight is tight and lubed is lubed.


8

You might enjoy reading David Hembrow's analysis of regular Dutch bikes: http://hembrow.blogspot.com/2009/01/anatomy-of-reliable-everyday-bicycle.html Like the URL says: anatomy of a reliable everyday bike. Things like fenders and a fully-enclosed chainguard. Hub gear instead of derailler. Enclosed brakes.


8

Steel frames are strong and durable, but can rust; aluminum would be a better option. (Carbon fiber or titanium won't rust, but these are expensive enough not to want a bike left outside for security's sake.) An internal hub is sealed and will eliminate most drivetrain problems, especially if you don't use a front derailer. In addition, cleaning an ...


8

It doesn't matter for any perspective aside from convenience -- usually the most convenient gear to store it in is the gear you're going to use first when you start riding again.


7

Two things I've done in the past are to screw a hook like this into the wall: a little above the height of the front wheel hub when the bike is standing up, so I could just hook the front wheel to the wall, basically. In my case the hook is high enough up that the back tire of the bike is just off the ground, and is actually touching the wall, not the ...


7

Friends of mine use a Two-Bike Gravity Stand, and are really happy with it. It doesn't require any modifications to your apartment, and does a pretty good job at keeping the bikes out of the way. For myself, I installed a pulley system, but that does involve drilling in the ceiling.


7

This link doesn't have printable plans, but a small pic and a detailed description. Basically it's a connected set of slots that sit on the floor. I've seen slot-based racks at triathlons lately. If you are willing to expand your materials to PVC, I have built 4 racks that are variations of this plan. I think this has three advantages over wood: PVC is ...


7

The trick is to use the strength in your legs plus leverage to lift the bike. It is so simple I can hang my bike up one handed. Lock both front and rear brakes Walk backwards, resulting in the bike being vertical in front of you, with you standing behind it holding the handlebars Feathering the rear brake, manoeuvre the bike in location below the hook. The ...


7

If you need to fit a large number of bikes into a small(ish) space, hanging them on the wall is usually the best option. The simplest and cheapest route is to mount hooks into the studs which will normally be at 16" centers. If you want different spacing you can mount a header like a 2x6 or 2x8 to the to the wall and attach the hooks to the header. We ...



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