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13

We've spent our entire evolutionary history under the sun, but also aging quickly and dying at young ages. The evolutionary history argument just isn't very compelling. The current consensus is that sunscreen helps prevent skin cancer, and skin cancer is indeed common. On the other hand, I have seen references to theories suggesting that sunscreen might ...


12

Definitely something plastic, as that's going to be both safer and lighter than glass. I'd look for something that was polarizing, as that will reduce glare, and something that offers UV protection. You also should be aware that different colour lenses suit different light conditions, so you might need to make a decision based upon when you normally ride. ...


6

Get a thin, tropical-weight wool cycling cap. It'll keep the sun off your head but still breathe and wick sweat. I have one from Walz that's been just wonderful.


5

I offer an "informed decision" answer, partly based on a (slightly skeptical) medical knowledge, and from my experience as a biker. This should NOT be considered some truth emited by a potential authority-figure, neither an advice to act this or that way. On one hand, there is a very positive association between skin exposure to UV radiation (such as ...


4

I prefer yellow lenses to clear, for night riding. Another important aspect of fit is if they are too tight a seal around your cheekbones then they will tend to fog. I was very annoyed when Serfas changed their Hunter lens shape without renaming. When I bought a second pair online the new lenses come further down my face and make enough of a seal that the ...


4

This is complicated. The farther from the eye a mirror is, the larger it must be to provide an adequate field of view. This is one of the (several) reasons that bar-mounted mirrors are often unsatisfactory. Assuming you stick with helmet-mounted, you do want to get the largest mirror you can find, and one with a relatively long arm, so you can get it as ...


4

The real key for cycling sunblock is to not put it on your forehead, or wear some kind of bandana to block the sweat from getting in your eyes. Or wear a cycling hat under your helmet to protect your head from sunburn. I spray the sunscreen on the bottom half of my face, ears, neck etc. then use some additional cream/stick on my nose for added protection. ...


4

I'm a pasty white guy in the antipodes, and I burn like a sausage on flaming barbeque. I much prefer cloth-based sunscreen. That adds cooling as well as sun protection, and doesn't leave a greasy residue that has to be washed off. Getting sunscreen to stay on areas that are hot, sweaty and being rubbed is not easy and rarely effective. My preference is not ...


4

I recommend wearing a helmet and something like a cycling cap or something similar to an Under Armour skull cap that can absorb sweat and protect your head from the sun. As for your neck, I've always used sunscreen during sunny rides. Get a bottle that can fit in your saddlebag or backpack, and apply it liberally and as often as necessary. Sunscreen will ...


4

I generally wear a "headsweats" type cap/bandana as well as sunscreen on any exposed skin. This type of product has the added benefit of absorbing some or most of the sweat coming off your dome and headed for your eyes. And yes - as other posters have mentioned, this works well under a helmet, just like a bandanna would.


3

Use a bandana underneath the helmet. I have seen several bald riders using them.


3

I'd suggest any of the high-SPF "children's" sunblocks ... they work just as well as the "adult" versions, but are less irritating (they also tend to be [slightly] less expensive).


3

I wear sunblock all the time, because I burn easily, as much as cancer concerns. Alas, one to watch for, as you get older and lose hair, is to remember sunblock under the helmet, else you get burn lines.


2

Wear sunscreen. Make sure it has UVA and UVB protection, check the SPF and the UVA star rating (higher numbers means more protection). Make sure you apply enough sunscreen and reapply it often enough. There's some fairly detailed information on sunscreen here that you might find useful.


2

Definitely do something to protect the back of the neck, and your ears (even with a helmet). The other area that it seems often "surprises" you is the backs of your lower legs (though this may be peculiar to the higher latitudes I frequent). You of course need a sleeved jersey or sun lotion on your arms, and either knee-length pants or sun lotion on the ...


2

I ride with a bunch of old guys. They are all white guys who grew up in the midwest, working on farms, and spending a lot of time in the sun when the weather permitted it. It is interesting to me that all of them are fastidious when it comes to sun protection. They wear sunscreen and long sleeves when it can be done comfortably. They also can tell you about ...


2

At the very least you need to be aware of the potential for burning, since, if nothing else, it's unpleasant. (We'll let others preach about skin cancer, et al.) I don't burn easily, but, when cycling (with a helmet), and the sun is at all bright, I find it advisable to put sun block on the back of my neck, my lower arms (including hands), and my upper ...


2

I have a balaclava that's somewhat loose, and gives me the same problems. I assume the fabric of the sun drape is both interfering with the mirror as well as cutting out a bit of your peripheral vision? If this is the case, then we have the same problem. You have, essentially, three choices: What works for me is to simply pull the clava tighter against my ...


2

The answer is "they are probably safe" and "they don't work for spit". Skiers have exactly this same problem with ski goggles and what I have learned in 50 years of skiing is that if the goggle has an built in anti-fog coating, cleaning it with anything but a mild soap will ruin what minimal anti fog coating it has. Sunglasses generally don't have much in ...


1

A stupid owner of a bike shop said to me, "See these glasses - they cost $300 a pair and they weigh XX grams." I said holding up my glasses, "See these, they are industrial safety glasses, they protect my eyes from ultraviolet, stones from cars and trucks, everyone stocks them, they are nearly impossible to break and they cost $7 a pair." This was my way ...


1

There are several commercial products that may or may not help: Cat Crap, Jaws Quick Spit, McNett Sea Drops, Clarity Defog It As DIY Goes: Spit, baby shampoo, bar soap or dish soap wiped over the lens and buffed mostly off the inside of the lens. Some folks report success with all of these methods. Do they work better than nothing? Probably. Will they ...


1

You may also consider cutting small holes in your neck tube just front of your nose. This will provide an easier channel for the air to follow, forcing it down instead of up into your eyes. There is a breed of ski masks that do the same thing, and one that comes to mind is made from neoprene, so it is quite warm. They might not be quite to your taste, but ...


1

I use long sleeves to shield myself from the sun during long exposures. I found a lightweight trekking shirt from REI to be a good fit, it dries quickly and is rather vented and the arms are made to be rolled up and buttoned to stay in place when you don't want the long sleeves. I used this on my last 4 day tour for almost the entire ride. Also, Pearl ...


1

Solar light cap Oasis or Kayak models do well for sun coverage, while additionally providing evening light power (for the touring).


1

Anything wrong with the traditional cycling cap?


1

Another Baldy Here! Seems like the answers cover the range of options. I typically go with "headsweats" type options with wicking fabrics and buy em only when they are on sale. On a day where I do not expect to sweat a lot, I roll with a bandana. A couple points that haves not been mentioned in regards to sunblock: 1) Sunblock has a tendency to run and ...



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