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25

First off, when riding over rough terrain you should be hovering above your saddle, not sitting on the saddle. This holds whether riding a hard tail (no rear suspension) or riding a full suspension bike. If you are sitting you have less ability to move your weight around, and therefore less control of the bike. When sitting it is easy for a large bump to ...


18

If we assume that both models are at about the same price point, here is what you can expect: The hardtail will be substantially lighter than a comparably priced full-suspension bike. The hardtail will likely have a higher level of components and possibly a better front shock because of the increased expense associated with the full suspension frame. ...


17

You turn it on when riding on smooth surfaces or going up hill to improve pedal efficiency. It's hard to know if you will need it in advance because without riding the bike you won't know how well the suspension design handles pedal bob (the energy lost by the bike suspension compressing under pedal forces), try and get a test ride.


16

This choice really does depend on what kind of terrain you will be riding on. I'm also assuming you are intending to buy a quality full suspension bike. Anything under like $800-$1,000 USD, don't bother. Go hard tail with a good fork. The bumpier the terrain, the more a full suspension bike will help suck up the hard hits. You can really fly over rocks and ...


14

Price - a suspended frame is much more complicated and expensive to make, and a good shock alone can cost more than a decent rigid frame. Maintenance - both shocks (due to gaskets/seals, lubrication, cleaning) and elements suspended frames (additional bearings) are relatively high-maintenance and short-lived, compared to rigid frames. This also translates ...


14

You might find a suspension seatpost to be comfortable, but a suspension seatpost is not a substitute for a full suspension bike. The purpose of a suspension seatpost is purely comfort (though as mikes mentions, not everyone agrees that they achieve this goal), where as the purpose of a full suspension bike is first and foremost control. Suspension on the ...


11

Modern suspensions have a valve inside, and when the suspension moves, the valve moves inside oil, and the oil is forced to pass a very narrow opening. The size of this opening is different depending if the suspension is compressing or returning. Usually, there is a spring which lets the oil flow more when it compresses, and less when it rebounds (the ...


10

I'd say the biggest change is the shift from coil and oil shocks to air springs. Even at the cheaper end of the market most bikes designed to go uphill will be using air shock suspension. Air suspension is lighter but in the past has performed less well and been more expensive. Over the years price has fallen and performance has improved. The other big ...


9

The Rockshox at Paris Roubaix were a Greg LeMond thing. Whatever Greg competed in a few 'out there' cycling innovations came along with him. Remember those tri-bars that gave him the aero tuck position to beat Laurent Fignon in the Tour de France? On that event he also had his own road bars that had an extra position, where the drop handlebar end plugs would ...


9

This fork setting exists so that the fork can be customized to your weight (major reason) and riding style (minor reason). It's simply the initial compression of the internal spring in the fork. The more it's compressed, the stiffer the fork will feel. Bigger preload compresses the spring more, and so it's best for heavier riders and/or people who ...


9

I'm told rear suspension is not a must have That's right, there is even a category in Down Hill races called "hard tail", for people with, well, hard-tail bikes. And they kick some serious arses with those bikes. What is the ride like without rear suspension, what do I lose? You have to pay attention where you put that rear wheel on. With a full, ...


9

I'm assuming this is your bike and you really mean that you've removed the fork from the bike as disassembling the fork isn't really something you do by mistake. The specs I found say that you've got a threadless stem and sealed bearing headset. This is easy to reattach. There are 3 or 4 bolts you need to be concerned with. One right at the top, that goes ...


8

Let me introduce you to the term 'Bicycle Shaped Object'... A 'Bicycle Shaped Object' (BSO) is not to be confused with a real bicycle. You get them in department stores, catalogue shops and supermarkets. They look like bicycles but they are not. Some BSOs come with 'full suspension' and this is the older patent-free design that gives 'pedal bob' - as you ...


8

The advantages of a front suspended bike is that holding the handlebar in off-road downhill is way less tiring and comfortable, and above a certain speed (and if the fork suspension is good enough) you will have much better grip on the ground and steering/braking control. The downside is that if you can't lock the suspension you might feel it's absorbing ...


8

Although this isn't explicitly part of your question, I'll go ahead and throw it in as it's one of the most important factors to consider in terms of increased suspension if you plan on pedaling your bike- the basic principle behind propelling a bike is to convert a mostly downward force (pedaling) into forward momentum (the drivetrain turning the back wheel ...


8

There are a couple of reasons. The KISS Principle If anything vital breaks while you're touring and you can't fix it on the spot, you're stranded. You're too far from home to call your mom for a ride. Unless you have a spare for the broken part, your options are some DIY jerry rigging and/or praying that someone with a truck comes by who will carry you and ...


7

First off many forks have a remote lock out as an add on. Fox and rock shox especially. If it has a lock out, a remote lock out is likely available. Secondly, a nice fork that is set up properly for your weight shouldn't need to be locked out all that often. I have had a variety of great fox and rock shox forks that i only lock on long, steep, grueling ...


7

Less expensive forks have a mechanical lockout. This type of lockout is only usable when the fork is unweighted. Think of it like trying to deadbolt your door when it's still ajar. Higher end forks- coil or air- use a hydraulic lockout. There's a lot going on inside them but to simplify things a bit, there are two valves in the damper of most mid-high end ...


7

Proviso - my advise presumes you are not looking at forking out $2K or more for a bike, and probably significantly less. At a high price point I might suggest suspension. I also presume the gravel section is well maintained with average (pea - grape) size gravel (Where I ride, we sometime use logging roads, the "gravel" is stones about 2"-3" across.), and ...


7

You will not damage a suspension fork by hanging it upside down. Although the fork is air sprung it also uses oil for dampening in one of the legs. Oil may leak if your seals are degraded. The seals in suspension forks are made to ensure they don't react with the suspension oil. The oil will actually help lubricate the seals. This is the same for coil ...


7

There are seatpost shims available for a few dollars. You should get them easily in your local shop or online. I use an aluminum shim in one of my bikes with exactly the dimensions you need, it works flawlessly and looks very clean. I got it for about 3.50 € (5$).


6

Some pro racers have successfully campaigned full-suspension bikes. However, pro racers have big budgets and team mechanics to keep everything ship-shape. A good rear shock absorber can cost more than an entry-level bike... For most off-road riders, they are simply not necessary; let your legs be the suspension.


6

Efficiency: On a suspension bike, some of the energy from the rider's pedaling is translated into the bike bouncing up and down on the suspension, so that's a strike against it. In addition, weight is a factor: Suspension makes a bike heavier, and this is a particular concern with road bikes. It's much harder to fit racks on a bike with suspension. ...


6

A remote lockout might sound like a good idea in theory but in practice you will find it largely unnecessary for the type of bike you're considering getting. That's not to say that it wouldn't be nifty to have, but I think you'll find that you will use it so rarely that you might regret limiting your purchasing options based on that feature. Remote lockouts ...


6

Seat post suspension is not designed for efficiency. It is designed to add comfort to a hard tail mountain bike frame. There are only a few really good suspension seat posts, and they are rarely used on hybrid bikes. Almost always, you will find that the suspension post on a basic hybrid is just a spring in a tube. Occasionally, they add the ability to ...


6

To me (and for others, I think) the greatest paradigm shift (that should become widespread in the near future, my opinion) is the inertial-controlled compression-lockout valve (Fox Terralogic, Specialized BRAIN). These work as automatic lockouts, which make the bike stable if the rider pushes it down (like pedalling hard on a smoot uphill, or sprinting on ...


6

You can purchase a rack adapter thats primary use is for mixte, womens bikes or bike with angled top tubes. It is a removeable bar that attaches to the seatpost on one end and then attaches between the stem and the headset top bearing at the other end. You then hang the bike on the rack by the adapter.


6

Bouncyness* may not be the appropriate term for the behavior you need from your suspension. Suspension has two main functions: Shock Absorbing and Dampening. Shock absorbing is what the fork does by compressing, allowing the wheel to travel upwards. In this process, kinetic energy from the shock is used to compress either a coil spring or an air spring. ...


6

disadvantages : more weight (more material, more oil) more energy required in order to pedal the bike is less snappier because it "eats" some of the terrain, so dirt jumping tricks (e.g 360s, backflips, frontflips) are harder than on bikes with less suspension some people believe that more suspension is not appropriate when learning to ride MTB and ...


6

Mid range touring bikes come with shocks because because mid range consumers will buy them. Department store bikes come with full suspension because people buy them. High end touring bikes don't come with shocks because high end consumers don't see the value. A bicycle does not need to be used for how it is classified/designed. I use a cyclocross with ...



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