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2

I've serviced the brain on my 2006 sworks stumpy several times over the past few years, mostly because of the crummy turnaround times from spesh, and the fact that it never makes it through more than half a season before losing lockout etc. And the fact that I'm a mechanical engineer and stupidly tear into anything that breaks thinking I can handle it (half ...


1

It really depends on the conditions you ride in - wet and muddy or very fine dust may require more frequent tear downs. whether or not you use a shock protector e.g a Lizard Skin IMO use one if you can but your frame may not allow a protector to fit in. the age of the shock and the condition of the wiper seals. Again if the wiper seal is letting ...


3

1: Your assumption is correct yes, only one side gets "preloaded". 2:It's done like that mostly to save on expense and because a preload adjustment on both sides would be overly fiddly when the adjustment can be accomplished with one knob. 3: Asymmetry, yes. Unfavorable, not so much. Forks are designed to be very stiff where they are not supposed to ...


3

I'm not sure about the term "cross bike", which doesn't seem to be used in English-speaking countries (except as an abbreviation for cyclocross, but that's not what this bike is); perhaps it's what we call a "hybrid bike" (although hybrids usually don't have a suspension fork) Cyclocross bikes are a totally different category. They are intended for racing, ...


4

I don't know why, but Merida seems to be confusing the terminology. Cross is typically short-hand for cyclocross and used interchangeably. If you told me you were looking for a cross bike I would instantly assume you mean 'cyclocross.' Cyclocross bikes, are somewhat race specific and sacrifice suspension for speed. Most cyclocross forks are going to absorb ...


0

You shouldn't count on it, no. Low-end and touring forks may not have the parts available at all. With medium-to-high end MTB forks, the parts may be available but it often requires exchanging most of the innards, making it a much too costly proposition. It in not just a matter of adding a lever to the top.


1

Depends on your fitness, back strength and duration of your rides. You choose the Hardtail (front suspension) if you want the fastest ride, and you are able to stand up on the most bumpy sections, including bumpy sections that are flat or slightly downhill, where you benefit from pedaling. The hardtail will be lighter, and more stiff and efficient at ...


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I disagree with most of what has been said here. A full suspension bike is more comfortable, rides better, is easier for your body on longer rides and it is just better than hardtails in pretty much everything. For example, if you take a look at MTB XC World Cup you will see a lot of pros riding a full suspension, and keep in mind that even though their only ...


0

Not sure what year brain you are talking about, but I have a 2005 epic. Both Fox and specialized told me that they didn't have parts and couldn't service the unit - pish posh! I found the schematics on line, cross referenced all the seals and "proprietary" parts and have stripped the shock and brain down for rebuild. Their is no mystery on the 2003 to ...



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