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21

Everyone climbs at their own best rate and cadence. On a tandem, both riders have to ride at the same rate and cadence, which will be closest to those of the strongest rider. So neither of them are climbing at their best rate and cadence. On a tandem with very well matched riders, they are in fact quicker, largely due to the draughting effect of the two ...


17

(My experience, for context: my girlfriend and I have ridden tandems quite a bit -- in the last 6 months we put in a few thousand touring miles on our tandem, and we've been riding tandems for several years now.) There are several factors to consider when deciding who's going to be the stoker (at the back) and who's going to be the captain (at the front): ...


12

The Timing chain helps keep the front and back riders pedals rotating at the same time. Depending on your preferences you can set them as "in phase" where both the front and back cranks are at the same point in the rotation, or as "out of phase" where the front and back cranks are offset by 90 degrees. This is advantageous as when one of the riders reaches ...


11

There are bicycles with a crankshaft that runs through the rear axle. The "Tur Meccanica Bi Bici" is such a bicycle: I can't tell from your picture if it's the same bike or not, but it certainly could be.


7

It's hard to tell from your picture because they're out of focus, but they look a bit like grease nipples: i.e. like the ones in the top left of the picture. Do they have the little ball bearing in the middle?


7

When climbing a hill on single it is normal to rock the bike side-to-side as you climb. This rarely matches exactly for both riders. It's similar to the way people run slower in a three legged race.


6

I think this should be possible, as long as your wife is happy in the navigator position and you are OK with being the bug-shield. Having the larger person on the back is difficult, but may be possible with unusual designs. I'm always banging on about how important bike fit is and a tandem is no different. Do make sure you try as many as possible before ...


5

You will need a specialty tool referred to as a crank remover or crank extractor. A Park Tool CCP22 or something similar. I would suggest considering the Park Tool CWP7 or equivalent as it offers increased flexibility. While the CCP22 is suggested for square shaft interface the CWP7 will do square, splined and octolink. While you only need the square type ...


5

Edited from my comments above: The first thing I would check is whether the hanger is removable. If it is removable, I would check that it is still bolted securely in place. It's pretty common that removable hangers sort of overlap with the dropout. So it's possible that the hanger is loose, and the QR is then clamping it firmly in to place, but then ...


5

It does sound like a tandem is a good option for you and your wife. A trike for her (many recumbents are trikes) might solve the balance problem, but not the speed issue. There are definitely folding tandems out there. Might even be able to fold up and stick in the back seat. The "simplest" way to get what you want is an an [S&S Coupled bike with a ...


4

I posted a link to this question to the Bike Friday Yak list - tandem riding is popular there - and got back a few responses, this one in particular. I'm posting this here simply because nobody else seems to have an answer; If this isn't typical, please feel free to edit this answer. A standard signalling vocabulary seems to not exist. Teams need to ride ...


4

Kool stop R9 Magura HS33 Pads are made to work with Rigida CSS rims. Also V-Brake inserts by kool stop for Rigida CSS rims.


4

You might simply go with a roof rack. It's like having a canoe on the roof - it overhangs in the front a bit but the rails will work just fine. I've loaded four bikes, including a tandem, on the roof of a Subaru Impreza. For the extreme example, check out this tandem rack on a Smart. You also might have a look at the underlying geometry issues of her ...


4

I know they're not for an elliptical bracket, as there's other screws elsewhere for that Elliptical? Do you mean eccentric? Are you sure that's not what they're for? Maybe there's one set of bolts to adjust the orientation, and another to lock it in place. But there's also this on the spec sheet: LUBRICATION: "CB" twin force-feed to brackets and ...


3

In addition to the pre-ride checks covered here, I suggest you check that:- The sync (timing) chain between the front and back pedals is not too slack. You can expect it to move a centimetre or two closer when pinched, but visible droop is bad news and might be causing feelings of sudden changes of cadence. The pedals are in phase. That is, the right pedal ...


3

From the photo, it is possible to notice that the lower part of the front downtube, and the lower part of the bottom bracket boom tube (the one connecting both bottom brackets) surround the eccentric at an angle quite larger than 180 degrees. The following exagerated ilustrations shows it: That means, even if both bolts brake (If one breaks, the sudden ...


3

If it sticks out from the with of the car DO NOT carry the bike in the bumper carrier, if necessary, take both wheels out but take no chances, anything wider than the car is a danger to yourself and others, think about motorbikes.


3

I started tandeming with my wife as stoker, and it was suffering. She is a bit anxious on traffic, and made me too aware of low-level actions about controlling the bike. Eventually, she gave up worrying and we started to talk not about riding or about the bike, but about anything else. Then the things started to really work and we had fun. With my stepson, ...


3

Coordination: When riding in a group of singles, it can be hard to stay together on a hill climb, because everyone climbs at different paces. It depends on so many factors, weight, gear ratios, preferred cadence, getting out of the saddle when it feels comfortable and so on. Being forced to climb faster or even slower than you'd like to can upset a rider's ...


2

Yes, more detail about your riding scenario will help. Are you trying to ride it alone at times? Tandem wheelbase length could be an issue if you are going solo. Also, if you and the other rider are not leaning into turns correctly with each other, then this can be causing skid/balance issues. One last thing - the heavier rider may need to be in front. ...


2

The captain's weight hardly pushes the rear wheel down at all, while the stoker's weight is almost completely on the rear wheel, so check their weight is positioned correctly. If the stoker is standing up, this can shift weight off the rear wheel, making a skid more likely. Standing up on tandems is "advanced", some would add "insanity".


2

Yes, yes it is possible... If the tandem is loaded onto the carrier at an angle, it won't extend much beyond the width of the car or minivan (maybe not at all for a larger vehicle). It's not totally clear in the following picture, but the horizontal bars are tilted up a bit to make it more secure. It's necessary to bungee-cord the bike or otherwise ...


2

First off, in order for there to be any sort of a "crisis", both bolts would have to fail, an unlikely possibility on a reasonably well-maintained bike. But, beyond that, the integrity of the frame doesn't depend on the BB shell resisting twisting loads. Rather, due to the "truss" nature of the standard bike frame (tandem or not), the load on the shell is ...


2

In addition to the stated answers there is also a psychological reason: the Ringelmann effect. The more people work together on a task, the less each individuals' effort unconsciously (even if everyone thinks he does his best) becomes. This was first observed on rope pulling and the decrease in performance it is not explainable by synchronisation ...


1

I had a very similar frame on a tandem from Craigslist several years ago. That was a Schwinn. The frame is terribly flexible, you can't put an adult on the rear seat.


1

Probably not a Claud Butler or a BSA, as the headbadge is the wrong shape. The name on the handlebars and use of Benelux and Iscaselle suggests Italy (and Sturmey was big in hub brakes everywhere, so may not be British-made).


1

This a request for clarification rather than an answer (sorry, I don't have enough rep to comment yet). First thing to assess is the threading of the right cup. I assume the BB is English threaded, because it's a CB product; if this is correct then when you unscrew the right threaded left cup, the left threaded right cup would rotate in the same direction, ...


1

Grease fittings are still to be found on the Big Toys, but just about everything consumer-focused is of a sealed bearing design. @heltonbiker is right... the old stuff is just forced out by the new stuff. What you've got there is the same head design for a fitting that's show in the Wikipedia article too. Your crank isn't the sealed type and probably could ...


1

Not enough weight is on the back of the bike. Try riding the bike without a stoker and see if you get the same behavior out of the bike.


1

There is a nice bargain priced set on ebay right now - Sugino, search 'tandem crank' should get you there. Get your bid in, sure the crank will be good and you will have spares for all the rest. Failing that you can get a spare from Middleburn in the UK - pop them an email.



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