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21

Everyone climbs at their own best rate and cadence. On a tandem, both riders have to ride at the same rate and cadence, which will be closest to those of the strongest rider. So neither of them are climbing at their best rate and cadence. On a tandem with very well matched riders, they are in fact quicker, largely due to the draughting effect of the two ...


12

The Timing chain helps keep the front and back riders pedals rotating at the same time. Depending on your preferences you can set them as "in phase" where both the front and back cranks are at the same point in the rotation, or as "out of phase" where the front and back cranks are offset by 90 degrees. This is advantageous as when one of the riders reaches ...


7

When climbing a hill on single it is normal to rock the bike side-to-side as you climb. This rarely matches exactly for both riders. It's similar to the way people run slower in a three legged race.


5

Edited from my comments above: The first thing I would check is whether the hanger is removable. If it is removable, I would check that it is still bolted securely in place. It's pretty common that removable hangers sort of overlap with the dropout. So it's possible that the hanger is loose, and the QR is then clamping it firmly in to place, but then ...


5

You will need a specialty tool referred to as a crank remover or crank extractor. A Park Tool CCP22 or something similar. I would suggest considering the Park Tool CWP7 or equivalent as it offers increased flexibility. While the CCP22 is suggested for square shaft interface the CWP7 will do square, splined and octolink. While you only need the square type ...


3

In addition to the pre-ride checks covered here, I suggest you check that:- The sync (timing) chain between the front and back pedals is not too slack. You can expect it to move a centimetre or two closer when pinched, but visible droop is bad news and might be causing feelings of sudden changes of cadence. The pedals are in phase. That is, the right pedal ...


3

Coordination: When riding in a group of singles, it can be hard to stay together on a hill climb, because everyone climbs at different paces. It depends on so many factors, weight, gear ratios, preferred cadence, getting out of the saddle when it feels comfortable and so on. Being forced to climb faster or even slower than you'd like to can upset a rider's ...


2

In addition to the stated answers there is also a psychological reason: the Ringelmann effect. The more people work together on a task, the less each individuals' effort unconsciously (even if everyone thinks he does his best) becomes. This was first observed on rope pulling and the decrease in performance it is not explainable by synchronisation ...


1

It is not harder to ride uphill if your captain and stoker are in perfect unity. I ride a tandem with my wife a lot, and I find it way easier to climb hills with a stoker than riding single. If you have the proper communication, then it's literally two people riding one bike, which is double the power of one person riding one bike. The real disadvantage of ...


1

I had a very similar frame on a tandem from Craigslist several years ago. That was a Schwinn. The frame is terribly flexible, you can't put an adult on the rear seat.


1

Probably not a Claud Butler or a BSA, as the headbadge is the wrong shape. The name on the handlebars and use of Benelux and Iscaselle suggests Italy (and Sturmey was big in hub brakes everywhere, so may not be British-made).


1

I think it may have to do with the pressure in your tires. I experience this in an overloaded bicycle as the tire pressure drops (over time) the rear wheel will sometimes feel like it is slipping out from under me on uneven surfaces even if I am not breaking and the surface is dry. I never had this problem with higher pressure tires, it only has begun since ...



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