Hot answers tagged

40

I have a 1990 steel racing tandem, and sadly it gets more miles solo than with a stoker. The main differences between tandems and solo bikes apply when riding a tandem on your own (rear wheel cuts corners more, you can't bunny hop) but points to note: Cars may not see the rear of your bike, and may not anticipate the extra space required when pulling up ...


15

Doesn't seem like too big a deal. It should be similar to having someone on the back who's not pedaling, only lighter and faster.


12

I have a tandem and I have ridden it solo. It's not hard from a handling point of view, and at least with mine it's easier than riding tandem – it's just riding a bike with an exceptionally long rear end. Sure, more friction and a lot more weight, but overall something any cyclist with a tiny amount of experience can handle.


7

Riding a tandem solo isn't a big deal. It's just a big long heavy bike; as others have said easier than riding a tandem with a stoker if they're not putting much power in. Apart from the "funny" comments you get, the only actual issue I've noticed is that you don't get so much grip on the back wheel without the weight over it. I tried standing on the pedals ...


5

It will certainly be more difficult than riding a standard bicycle. Although I don't feel like it would be impossible by any means. The factors to consider are: Weight - the Tandem weighs a lot more than a standard bicycle Wind - larger surface area means more effect from crosswinds Length - This will play very little with the transport as far as riding ...


3

You can use whatever cranksets you like and have available. But tandems need either an eccentric bottom bracket on the front, OR a chain tensioner in order to set the tension on the link/timimg chain. 1.1. If you are only pootling around on the flat then perhaps the loss of the front chainring is acceptable. But any hills or a good stiff headwind and ...


2

It's definitely possible to do #1, although you need to match the bolt pattern and bolt circle diameter (BCD). That's a common change for many cyclists. If you're running both chains on the right hand side standard cranksets are all you need (this is typically why people do that) Chainline is important, and typically you would put both idler chainrings on ...


2

Aww man I'm jealous - can you please add a side-photo of the whole bike? 70's tandems were renouned for being quite short, and most of the length is lost in the stoker's area. Mine's a 80's model and one of the touted features is "2 inches more stoker room!" So if you want the full 70's look, embrace the aero advantage of being so close. And don't ...


1

Any cranks should do, as long as you can attach two chain rings to the rear spider. My guess is that chainline is unlikely to be an issue if it differs by up to 30mm, as it's a longer run than on, say, a dérailleur system which seems to cope fine with offsets of at least 30mm. What you will need to watch is that the two chains are narrow enough that they ...


1

It's usually easier than with a partner. I've been on one home-welded tandem where the front and back pedal cogs had different number of teeth and thus were not synchronized. That posed a problem for leaning into curves since the reflex of putting the inner pedal up did not match with the other pedal pair. It's astonishing how much of a nuisance this can ...


1

Two more options for you. Load the bike onto a trailer and tow it behind the car. Your car would need a towball or whatever fittings are legal in your location. Ride the bike there and back It would feel slower, but you get there without having to pack the car. Overall time could be similar, plus you can ride a great circle and don't have to ride back ...


1

Can you tow a trailer with your car? That would be the safest and most responsible way to move your tandem. Second option would be to ride it there, over the course of a day with rest stops you and your co-rider could do 100 km. Another option would be a roof rack, like others have mentioned. Your vehicle's roof looks long enough to accept the full ...


1

You may have a few troubles with the curved stoker seat tube, front derailleurs can be remarkably tricky to set up correctly. You can find some more useful experiences here. In particular, you may have to experiment with some low cost parts before committing to something pricier as your choice of chainring sizes will determine where along the curve the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible