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41

Cyclists shaving their legs is more tradition than anything else--there is a whole industry around creams, soaps, and salves. However, I'll defer to Sheldon Brown's explanation for a few acceptable reasons why they do it: To prevent infection when crashing. To pull off bandages more painlessly after dressing a wound. To get a massage of the legs without ...


31

Reference - Cyclecraft by John Franklin A cycle takes more than twice as far to stop using only the rear brake compared to using only the front brake, which will usually stop the machine just as quickly as using both brakes. Nevertheless, you should always apply the rear brake, and slightly in advance of the front brake, so that a slight skid at the rear ...


26

What could be simpler than remembering that the left-hand pedal has left-hand thread?


25

For the most part, the same kind of advice you give to any cyclist will suffice here. Encourage them to take it easy at first, to give them the opportunity to experience cycling--and specifically climbing--in a supportive, non-threatening environment. Pick a good route What hills and roads you pick will have an effect on how the newbie cyclist perceives ...


22

You're most efficient sitting with a cadence between 80 - 100 (faster if you can do it) so it's recommended that you stay seated as much as possible. For mountain biking staying seated increases the weight on your rear tire and reduces the chances of it slipping as long as you can keep a smooth spin stroke and not 'mash' the pedals on the down stroke. ...


21

You're talking about a "bunny hop" and it can be done at speed on a loaded bike but it's high risk. You'd almost certainly be better off jumping off the bike and rolling. US Bike Trials call it a "side hop", but in anglonesia I've mostly heard it called a bunny hop. Here's a photo of the 2006 Cycle Messenger World Champion doing more or less that at about ...


17

Whilst I come from a mountain bike background so my advice might be different from someone with a road background, I've found the following tips work well when I've been on a road bike in the mountains. Keep your weight centered - don't be tempted to lean back. You want to keep a good amount of weight over the front wheel to help it grip. Look through the ...


17

I ride both SS/FG and approach climbing hills much of the same way I would if I were on a geared bike with one very big exception...MOMENTUM. When on a heavily geared SS/FG I gain as much speed as possible going into the hill and push hard to maintain it throughout the climb. Basic climbing tips: Slide back on saddle and drive heels through the bottom of ...


17

Years ago when cars started to get ABS, the argument was that a skilled driver could stop quicker with it turned off, and there was proof of it. When Traction control came in a skilled driver could go faster with it turned off. When ESP became available, ditto. We all know that an unskilled driver benefits enormously from these aids, and it turns out not ...


16

Weight distribution is critical, and it is a bit of a fine balance, much like doing a track stand. I find that it is easiest to do this by staying seated and crouching towards the front of the bike. Standing on the pedals will tend to put your weight too far forward and make it difficult to achieve smooth power transfer to the wheels. Smooth Power Transfer ...


16

I happen to be one of those who attract new riders into the sport, and have given the basic training to many people. Here is a brief of what I try to teach them: Riding position Be ready to react Have your bike properly tuned/fitted Scan the terrain(Look forward) Use a proper braking technique Never get to the extremes Grow progressively The most ...


16

In german this is called "Hinterrad versetzen" -- "displacing the back wheel". I got to learn this in an mtb course I took a while back. If you can, try to find an instructor or other experienced rider to teach you. How to practice: Start very, very small and always wear full protective gear, i.e. a full-face helmet and vest in case you crash. You will ...


15

Group rides of this size and speed often consist entirely of racers. If a steady double paceline hasn't formed, then to be more specific, this is one of those rides that is, in effect, a race itself. So with that in mind, so some general thoughts about these types of group rides: If they are all wearing the same jersey and you are not, ask permission to ...


15

Downtube shifters will really get you in touch with your bike--more than with many other shifting systems, I believe that I can actually FEEL the rear derailleur moving in my hand when I use them. Needless to say, I ride a lot of old road bikes. You will quickly gain the control to shift either from various hand positions on your road bars. Assuming ...


15

Make sure the tension is low at first (should be a little screwn on face of pedal). Generally you will get to a point of looseness where you are popping out unintentionally, go just tigher than that. Cleat placement also can be a factor. The closer to the toe it is, the easier it tends to be to get out. Be careful about moving too far from the balls of ...


15

Not a stupid question. The simple answer is that they are throwing every ounce of leverage, weight, and power into the pedals and that much movement side to side is the visible result of trying that hard to move forward. If you could stay absolutely still, and input the same amount of force to the pedal, then more of that energy would go to moving forward, ...


15

There are three approaches you can use in combination. Preparation Tough tires - people have their favorite puncture-proof tires. Kevlar reinforced tires work pretty well. Hard tires - pump your tires to close to the maximum pressure written on the side wall. This definitely reduces punctures, and can be combined with puncture-proof tires. At the time ...


14

Unless you have a Victorian ladies style frame, crossing your leg in front of you is a fine way to crash.


14

Do it little by little. Like a learner driver, go find a car park or a quiet road, you don't want to be doing this in the traffic. Ironically, you probably don't want to be doing this on a surface that will give you a soft landing. I suppose a flat playing field might work, but cycling on grass isn't as smooth as cycling on tarmac and you'll need a ...


14

Use proper positioning. This is most important. Unless the outermost lane is as wide as two SUVs, ride in its center. When it's safe, reasonable and necessary to let drivers pass, kindly move over; but always leave at least 18 inches (0.5 m) between you and the curb. The driver behind you may have to wait a minute or two, but they'll survive. If they've ...


13

@GuyZee covers most of the technique side, but I'd like to add that if you're experiencing difficulty climbing hills, you should also use a lower gear. Faster cadences are a great way to build up your endurance and help with the hill climbs to boot. Spinning is winning!


12

A shorter stem does make your steering quicker, it also enables you to sit further upright and gives more leverage on the handlebar. The longer stem gets you more forward and in a better position for climbing but I think it makes low speed steering awkward and is uncomfortable for long stretches on the bike. I went from some ungodly long stem (100+mm) with ...


12

It's the best way to show off the hard work you've put into developing all those muscles :)


12

They quite simply must sway the bike back and forth because of the mechanical reality of the situation. It's not even really a conscious act — if the rider didn't do this, the bike would fall out from under them. These riders are applying extreme power to each pedal. Since the pedals are not centered laterally, applying a large force to the right pedal (for ...


12

Being aware of your weight distribution can help a lot. You want to make sure you are not leaning forward and taking pressure off of the rear tire. You can also help keep your rear tire planted by giving a slight downward twist on the handlebars with your wrists. Kind of the opposite of a bunny hop. As far as braking technique goes, try to be ...


12

I'd qualify myself as a "skilled" cyclist. I would not say that I only use the front brake 95% of the time. When riding in a peleton it would be very dangerous to make any kind of sudden stop as you cause alarm and possible collision with people behind you. If i do need to slow in a group, I use only my back brake. It allows a far more gradual slowing and ...


11

I divide between two extremes: Riding long distance with lots of stuff on good pavement: load the bike; Riding short distance with not so much stuff and/or on rough road: load the back; Of course, there are some additional considerations: If the road is so harsh you must stand up to manoeuver (off-road, back-country, XC, etc.), load yourself. The bike ...


11

Yes there is one main trick, and some regular skills. The trick is: if you LOWER THE TIRE PRESSURE, any tire will float over sand like magic. It should not be so underinflated as to allow easy pinch flats, but the lower the pressure, the more marked the floating effect. There are just two limitations: If the tire is skinny (low volume) it might not be ...



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