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-1

stand behind your bike, the pedal always removes when it points towards the direction of your rear wheel. just like how it gets left behind as you move forward. lol just my way of remembering


3

Some points. If you bunny hop by getting both wheels to leave the ground at the same, the rear wheel has to jump the length of the obstacle plus the length of the bike to clear the obstacle. A more modern, trialsy and BMX-y bunny hop is what is what is sometimes called an 'American bunnyhop'. In this, the front is hauled up first, then the back as the ...


1

Perhaps a light weight bike and a pedal like this might help you :) AFAIK a best way to make a bunny hope is to start with a correct procedure. Low your breast on the handlebars, then push it upwards and when the time to make the rear fly arrives, link your feet on your pedals (with the teeth on it) as strong as you can and push them back. Your legs should ...


0

Since you mention fixed speed, your remaining options are: higher bunnyhop late bunnyhop (as late as possible) land with the bike pushed (as you mention)


0

I would always go with panniers or a handlebar bag before loading my body up. I live in Woodland Park Colorado where there are only uphills and downhills. I can assure that any weight put on my person will be felt on a climb! I used to commute to work, it was an 800 foot climb in about 3 miles. Nothing extreme, however, it taught me very quickly to put my ...


3

When none of the wheels of a bicycle are on the ground, the center of mass is going to accelerate downward at approximately 9.8m/s/s and there's nothing the rider can do to significantly alter that. If both wheels touch the ground while the center of mass is at the highest possible point where that can occur, there will be a severe limit as to how much ...


2

Landing with the rear wheel first is rarely a good idea nowadays. The video, although very "ballsy" and really of great historical importance, is very old school in regards to bike technology, terrain and rider technique. Landing with the rear first is only useful when you need to drop to flat from more than 10 feet where you need a way to absorb as much ...


0

I chose the internet to find the answer to the question which way does each pedal loosenand from what ive learned I would answer your question with ' put the wrench on the pedal at 12 o'clock like the arm on a clock and turn it towards the back of the bike for both sides to loosen, I may be wrong but I'm about to try and find out for myself.


8

All those riders were doing a very specific of rear wheel landing where you land into a momentary manual (finding a balance point on the rear wheel by shifting your weight backwards and pulling on the handle bars with your arms and upper back). This lets you absorb the impact with your upper back and legs (the two biggest muscle groups in the body) as well ...


6

I can't watch the video now, but there are two reasons to land on the rear wheel first: The first wheel to touch down is more likely to suffer a loss of control or traction. It's a common two wheel maxim that "most rear wheel slides recover, most front wheel slides crash", so you want that wheel to be the rear. It can help absorb the impact. Imagine the ...


3

When you land you tend to go out the front rather than the back. You pretty much never land in perfect alignment and even if you do you get pushed around. If you land front wheel first the rear wheel is going to come around and only get worse. When the rear does touch it will be out of alignment. As you absorb with your arms you only get more forward ...


0

Landing on the back wheel is a technique used to offer greater control of the bike when landing or transitioning between bike maneuvers. When landing on the rear wheel, your positioning on the bike has a greater amount of control and stability. Say, for instance, you need to turn or pivot the bike in order to land safely or successfully transition into a ...


13

Landing on the rear wheel is a safe bet when you are not sure about the landing zone. For example a small tree root would be catastrophic if you are landing with both wheel. What happens is that since the downwards force from the fall is applied to both wheels, it is much harder to roll over the obstacle. If the front wheel cannot roll over, you basically ...


0

The problem with a lot of mnemonics is that it depends on which side of the bike you are looking at. Since Shimano pedals are attached using a hex wrench from the side opposite the pedal, the "righty-tighty" rule does not really work effectively. What I remember is the way the bolt has to turn is "ride on, back off". In other words, if you want to put the ...



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