Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

While not disagreeing with the first answer above I think there are a few more complexities that haven't been addressed. Changes in bike technology are not linear but rather generational. Component improvements don't happen each year but rather every 3-4 years. Aside from pro and sponsored riders most riders would not see any value in replacing a bike for ...


4

The raw pedal force or torque data are difficult to work with but you can extract some information from them. First, note that Stages mounts the strain gages (or gauges) permanently to the crank, so the crank length is constant and they know what it is; that means that there is a one-to-one relationship between the kgf and torque columns. In this case, it ...


3

Your current bike has decent wheels and reasonable components. If they have been maintained well I don't think you'll see much difference there other than 10spd gearing. The big change to a new bike in that price range will be the frame. It is much easier now to get a frame that actually fits your riding style, I see you have an adjustable angle stem. ...


2

Most speedometers are accurate as long as you input/set the right wheel size! I have used very cheap ones, and they allow me to set the wheel size in milimeters, and after checking the same path with two different cars, the difference is minimal compared to what I had with the bicycle (in a 25Km ride the difference was only 10 meters compared to the cars). ...


2

I don't think accuracy is a problem, even with cheap ones. I tested my first one (cheap chinese) against Google Earth and the marks on the road (every 100 m) on a paved straight road over a 15 km ride, and the differences are minimal. Cheap models only let you specify the nominal wheel size in inches. Better ones present a list with all relevant wheel sizes ...


2

TL; DR: There is going to be a lot of difference. A 1500 Euro bike today would probably be comparable to a 6-7000 Euro bike from 10 years ago. Elaboration: There are going to be quite a few improvements in the bike due to technology advances and research and development. Some of the base models will not be radically different from your frame, although even ...


2

Pretty broad but it has not been shut down Components High end road bikes are marketed to racers. UCI and other racing organizations have rules on what can and cannot be on a bike. Biggest changes will come from rule changes. UCI allows electronic gears. There is currently a minimum weight for road races and pro level bikes get under this limit so there ...


2

Alex Moulton (http://www.moultonbicycles.co.uk) has made full-suspension steel frame road bikes continuously since the 1960s. These are not slow low-end folding bikes: the Moulton marries 120psi tires with full suspension, overcoming the handicap of small wheels to produce a fast but rather heavy bike. Since 1987, the Moulton AM7, with 17-inch wheels, ...


1

I like @DWGKNZ's answer, especially where he's saying about things tending to move forward in big bangs, rather than some gradual linear progression. You will of course find small-scale enhancements year-on-year, but these would not be big enough to convince you to get a new bike, say. I just wanted to add something about hydraulic brakes. But also I'd say ...


1

Negative force/torque power !+ actively resisting the pedal. Thus, no conclusions about pedaling "style" (even for the left leg, which is all that Stages measures) can be drawn from data such as these.


1

I agree both are measuring torque/force. That is the ratio you would get with 170 mm cranks. 1 kgf = 9.80665 newtons. 7.3 * 9.80665 * 170 / 1000 = 12.2. But without pedal angle I agree you cannot calculate work or power (wattage). And this appears to be just one pedal. stagespower-tech-specs P=2∗((Fave∗9.8∗L)∗(R∗.1047)) From there, the rest ...


1

Our club has a group on Strava where we can discuss various trails/segments. Outside of that we use Facebook groups and a forum on our website to setup group rides or getting people together. I don't know of anything that would allow you to simultaneously compare a rider's data and then match up riders based on similar ability (or the other way to get ...


1

I assume we're not talking about some low-price, no-name thing from a Walmart sale but about one from one of the more common speedometer selling companies (cyclosport, sigma, garmin, to name a few). With those, I don't think that there will be significant differences in accuracy. Also wired vs. wireless should not make a difference by itself (unless the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible