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33

BSO Bicycle Shaped Object: A derogatory term for a very cheaply produced bike aleged to have very low quality components which can break when attempting to adjust them: For instance the BSO pictured is being sold in the UK by ASDA (owned by Walmart) for £75. These bikes tend to be mass produced and sold in flat pack boxes which must be assembled. As ...


30

Presta Valve / Presta Tube aka Sclaverand valve or French valve photo credit The Presta valve is a valve commonly found in high pressure road style and many mountain bicycle inner tubes. The air pressure in an inflated tire holds the inner valve body shut. A small screw and captive nut on the top of the valve body permits the valve to be screwed shut and ...


27

Door Zone The area next to parked cars that a suddenly opened door would cover. A hazard that you should avoid. Satirical portrayal of Santa Monica bike lane design; it illustrates the "door zone" concept well. Cycling in the Door Zone reduces your ability to react to hazards emerging from the space between parked vehicles. These may include ...


26

LBS LBS is the acronym commonly used for Local Bike Shop. The term is usually used when comparing small, privately owned shops with large chains, big box stores, and internet shops. http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnprolly/5728618798/


26

Bicycle racing is both about taking whatever small advantages you can, and putting your opponents in as disadvantageous a situation as possible. It's easy to understand this when there is a headwind; in that case, you get the most protection when you are drafting someone else. However, when there is a crosswind, the favored position isn't exactly behind the ...


25

Clipless pedals AKA clip-in or step-in Clipless pedals are pedals that require a special cleated cycling shoe that locks the shoe into the pedal. Clipless refers to the pedal not having a toe clip. There are two major kind of clipless pedals, LOOK and Shimano Pedaling Dynamics (SPD). To release clipless pedals, the rider typically twists his/her foot. ...


24

Yes, all bikes could ride on roads. However, a road bike is one that's optimized for riding on smooth pavement. It usually has skinny tires (no wider than 32mm, often much narrower) with a very light tread. (If they have any tread at all. Some road tires, such as the Kojac, are treadless or "bald", to cut down on rolling resistance.) Road bikes usually have ...


22

Fixed-Gear AKA: Fixie A fixed-gear bike has the rear gear locked to the hub, which fixes the pedals rotation to the rear wheels rotation. In other words, you can't coast: The pedals are always in motion as long as the bike is. Track bikes are commonly fixed-gear. The sprocket is screwed directly onto a fixed hub. When the rear wheel turns, the pedals ...


21

Cadence Cadence is the number of revolutions of the crank per minute. Cyclists typically have a preferred cadence at which they feel most comfortable, and on bicycles with many gears it is possible to stick to a favourite cadence at a wide range of speeds. Recreational and utility cyclists typically cycle around 60–80 rpm; racing cyclists around 80–120 ...


21

It has to do with the difference between pedals with toe clips and clipless pedals. Pedals with Toe Clips Clipless Pedals (and shoes) The clipless shoes are for the clipless pedals. The wikipedia page says the following: Clipless refers to the lack of an external toe clip, but not to be confused with platform pedals without toe clips.


20

b) is most correct, except that you don't need anyone else by your side. Taking the lane is riding pretty much right in the middle of the lane, and asserting control of the entire lane. Riding in the middle makes it obvious to motorists that they'll have to change lanes, or wait for a safe opportunity, in order to pass you.


18

Schrader valve/Schrader tube aka "American valve" or "car valve" The Schrader valve consists of a valve stem into which a valve core is threaded, and is used on virtually all automobile tires and most wider rimmed bicycle tires. The valve core is a poppet valve assisted by a spring. A valve cap is important on a Schrader valve because if one is not ...


17

Pannier A pannier, pronounced pan-yer /ˈpanyər, ˈpanēər/ (US) or pan-i-er /ˈpanɪə/ (UK) [1], is a bag designed to be mounted on the side of a bicycle rack. Bags can be made of nylon, canvas, or waterproof materials such as PVC. Rear is most common, but smaller panniers intended for a front rack are also available. Often erroneously called a saddlebag ...


15

Flip-Flop Hub Most often seen on fixed gear track (velodrome) bikes, a flip flop hub is hub that allows a cog to be attached to each side. This allows a rider of a fixed gear bike to effectively 'change' gears by taking the rear wheel off, flipping it around and reattaching the wheel. Track riders will use this to have a smaller (more teeth, fewer gear ...


15

Quick-release The term "quick-release" - often abbreviated as "QR" - usually refers to a quick-release axle, a device that allows the removal of a bicycle wheel without tools. Quick-release axle "Quick-release" also refers to several other types of quick-release mechanisms that are popular on folding bicycles, such as collapsible seatposts and folding ...


15

Tyre lever (in the UK anyway - WP redirects that to tire iron but to me that sounds more like metal fatigue. After all, they're not made of iron).


14

Triathlon bars or Aerobars Aerodynamic bike handlebars are for racing bicycles and particularly time trial bicycles. Included are narrow, bolt-on extensions that draw the body forward into a tucked position, pursuit bars that spread the arms of the rider but drops the torso into a slightly lower position, and integrated units that combine elements of both ...


14

A single speed bike has a single speed freewheel threaded onto the rear hub. The freewheel allows the rider to coast. A fixed gear has a single cog threaded on the rear hub, along with a reverse threaded lockring, to prevent the cog from getting loose. The cog has no freewheeling action, so any time the wheel is moving, the pedals are moving too. This setup ...


13

I believe what you're describing is the "Rim Tape". The rim tape covers up the holes in the rim (wheel) that the spokes attach through. Without that tape covering the holes, the innertube (air chamber) will be exposed to holes and sharp surfaces that are likely to cause another flat tire. If the rim tape is torn in one spot, but still covering all of those ...


12

Tire Lever aka Tire Iron A tire lever is a small, narrow lever used to help lift a tire off a rim. Traditionally they were steel, later aluminium alloy and now most commonly they are plastic. The most important feature of a tire lever is that it does not have any sharp edges that may "pinch" the tube (that is, become wedged between the tube and the ...


11

Stem Attaches the handlebars to the bike, or, more precisely, to the steer tube (when using a threadless headset) or fork (when using a threaded headset). Many different sizes and angles of stems are available, so that the rider can place the handlebars where they will be the most comfortable during riding. There are also adjustable stems made, so the rider ...


11

Dunlop Valve aka Woods valve or English valve The Dunlop valve is an older style valve that is no longer commonly found in the english speaking world. A pump designed for a Presta valve can be used to fill a tube with a Dunlop valve. More information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunlop_valve Go to Presta valve. Go to Schrader valve. Also see this ...


11

Not a big fan of this type of answer, but wikipedia has a pretty good definition of it. The races are usually 90-140 kilometers in total length. While some are longer or shorter, most are about 120 kilometers. The race is comprised of a set distance and number of laps over the established course[2]. There are typically 10 to 20 laps, of ...


10

Chain Tool or Chain Breaker Used to 'break' a chain by punching out one of the link pins. Needed to shorten a new chain to the correct length or to replace a broken link. A chain link is placed in the open slot and the handle turned to force a punch pin into the pin of the chain, pushing it out of the other side. Traditionally the tool needed to be ...


10

They probably weren't talking about the cranks per-se, but the whole crankset, which is the cranks and the chainrings. Compacts are cranksets with smaller chainrings (typically 50 teeth and 34 teeth) as opposed to standard cranksets which have say 52:42. Combined with wide-range cassette this can give a good range of gears without having to have a ...


10

To an extent, yes it does have negative connotations. The word was first used in cycling as an insult for Maurice Brocco, known as Coco,[4] in 1911. Brocco started six Tours de France between 1908 and 1914, finished none of them, although a stage he won in 1911 caused the coining of domestique. -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domestique In road ...


9

Bearing A bearing is an interface between parts that turn and parts that do not. The hubs in the wheels contain bearings, as do the bottom bracket, the head tube, and the pedals. Sheldon Brown on bearings. A standard bicycle wheel bearing consists of an axle, a hub, two cones, two locknuts, and a number of steel balls. In both ends of the axle is a ...


9

Chain Tug AKA: Chain Tensioner A device for use on bikes with horizontal dropouts, and normally with a fixed or single speed or hub gear. The chain tug(s) allow the chain tension and rear wheel alignment to be adjusted, and to stop the rear wheel from pulling forward while pedaling. Some chain tugs are available with derailleur hangers to allow ...


9

This is a "penny-farthing" bike. You mount it by putting a foot on the step above the back wheel, you push off, then climb up it towards the pedals as it moves away. (Like this video shows.) The front wheel was so large for a couple of reasons: Since the pedals were connected directly to the wheel, the bike could go faster if the wheel were larger; and ...


9

"Rolling attacks" are a series of sequential attacks on the peloton by typically a team or a group of riders acting as a team. R. Chung covered this nicely in the comment section, but I will expand a bit here. Typically you get two or three groups of riders together to orchestrate this (where a group may consist of one or more riders). The first group ...



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