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24

In addition to locking your bike securely with a good lock, there are several strategies you can use: Location Where you lock up can be nearly as important as how well you're locked up. If you're in a public, well-lit area, a thief might think twice about stealing a bike. A rack in an isolated, dark area may look more attractive to steal -- there aren't ...


19

get the kryptonite fahgettaboutit - as small as possible. http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Fahgettaboutit-Bicycle-U-Lock-6-Inch/dp/B000OZ9VLU best lock out there, I don't think you could cut it with bolt cutters, you would need a hydraulic jack (the main reason to go for a smaller lock, so there is no room for the jack), or a disc grinder to get thru it.


15

I would guess that hard evidence is going to be difficult to come by -- doing anything resembling a controlled experiment would be enormously expensive, and cyclists are too disorganized (by this I mean lacking unified organizational structure) to do some sort of sampling-based measurement or epidemiological study. I would just observe that, in my opinion, ...


11

A few years ago in Toronto, what was probably one of the biggest bike theft busts ever happened. Igor Kenk was trading drugs for stolen bikes, and stockpiling them by the thousands. (Supposedly he was planning to corner the market post-econopocalypse or post-ecopocalypse and be a king). Anyways, you can see pictures or the thousands of bikes that he stole: ...


10

There's no way to 100% secure everything, but there are things you can do to make it more difficult or time-consuming. Don't lock up your bike. Bring your bike with you instead of leaving it outside. Mine goes into my office. Choose a location where you or other people will see thieves messing with the bike. Not a super-high traffic area (in that case ...


9

A trick that couriers use around my area is to carry the key on a rubber band around their wrist - no more fumbling around in the pockets for a key. I find that a lock that you can wear across your chest like a bandolier is most convenient for carrying around. There are a number of chain locks around in this length that have a plastic tube over the chain to ...


9

For frequent use, I think it is hard to beat a lock that is built into the bike, e.g. the Axa Defender that is fixed to the fame of the bike and then locks the wheel; it also has a cable that you can use to lock the bike to the bake stand. It’s great for a lock on a “everyday” bike, as you can’t forget to take it with you.


9

Perhaps you might swap your current quick-release skewers by one of the many "anti-theft" alternatives (listed in my perceived order of security): Pitlock (www.pitlock.com): these require a special shaped key to open. You carry the keys with you, and no thief could take the wheel. Neither yourself if you lose the damn key; Velo Orange anti-theft skewers: a ...


9

Press charges, and have the police issue a warrant to search for a bike similar to yours/ Investigate (Asking her mom/neighbors questions about a bike that may be similar) If she shows up with one, you're out of luck, but it's probably not likely. Additionally, there is no way she would be able to pedal away with a bike that doesn't fit her, so her height ...


9

Bicycle Theft, Guide No. 52 (2008) gives details around bicycle theft in different variants, stages and from different perspectives, contains reference for theft data. 50 Denv. L.J. 177 (1973-1974) Marketing Theory and the Fencing of Stolen Goods; Roselius, Ted; Benton, Douglas (paywall!) -- goes down on marketing of stolen goods, and bikes are considered ...


8

For quill stems, you can use a rubber cement to glue a ball-bearing into the socket on the stem bolt, making it so you can't get at it with an allen key. You'd obviously want to use a glue that can be removed with a solvent, so that you'd be able to do regular service.


7

IANAL. Almost certainly no, for the same reasons that a parking deck owner is not liable for the theft of a car inside. Unless you can prove that the bicycle rack was installed improperly due to gross negligence, and the improper installation allowed the bicycle to be stolen even while locked properly, you would have no case whatsoever. Locking a bike ...


7

Don't bother - your bike, laptop bag, and cat litter were not lost. It was a horrible experience no doubt, but in the end you didn't lose anything. So what can be gained from this experience? Stopping anyone else's bike being stolen by the juvenile is the obvious one. If we assume that this was the first time she had attempted to steal bike - it went ...


7

As for the Kryptonite, cutting one side an bending is certainly possible, but in reality if you can cut one side, you use the same tools to cut the other. The tools needed to bend the link after cutting one side are almost certainly not portable, and why would you carry two tools when one will do. In comparison to the D-lock - if you can cut though 18mm, ...


6

The largest deterrent to theft is to make sure your bike is in your line of sight. There are a large number of registries which cater to the idea of a permanent and visible mark on the frame that is registered with an independent 3rd party, such as a police department. The real issue with those is that so few bikes actually get registered that most police ...


6

I'd recommend kryptonite. The Evolution Mini is used by a number of my friends (messengers) and they use it many times in a day. Keeps things secure and it's small. If you want a bit more flexibility in what you can attach to then go for a larger sized one. https://www.kryptonitelock.com/products/list.aspx?cid=1001&scid=1000


6

I second the advice suggesting a small U-lock. Also, see Sheldon Brown's advice for locking strategy, which has done me well so far.


6

They provide the rack for you to park your bike not necessarily lock it, that part is up to you. I have never heard anyone make a claim that ANY rack is safe, the courts will find that it is your responsibility to check the effectiveness of the rack. If shopping centers were responsible for the security of your bike, you would soon find that bike racks ...


6

According to campus police reports (apparently backed by video surveillance), an organized gang of bike thieves operates in my area using techniques like this. They use the following system: A few "spotters" stroll around the campus and pick out the $1500+ bikes. An hour or so later, a different thief, dressed in coveralls etc. comes by and cuts the locks ...


5

I like the Axa Defender that is fixed to the fame of the bike and then locks the wheel; it also has a cable that you can use to lock the bike to the bike stand. It’s great for a lock on a “everyday” bike, as you can’t forget to take it with you. As they are not common in the UK, most people don’t know how to defeat them. As always best to combine ...


5

If you have the serial number of your bike, the police will enter the information into NCIC. That's the National Crime Information Center. Anyone running that serial number will get a "hit" on your report. The main problem we have is that folks simply don't do it; they don't keep track of the serial number and we have to tell them that even if the bike is ...


5

This may qualify as anecdotal evidence.My riding buddies carbon road bike had a section of top tube cut out to steal his kids $200 mountainbike off of the trunk mounted bike rack.


5

You can get GPS trackers for bikes, just like cars and motorbikes. The good ones warn you immediately when your bike starts moving (eg via text message to your phone) and you can see where it is on a map for recovery (you might want to call the police rather than tackle thieves yourself). Of course the downside to GPS trackers is than they stop working if ...


5

10 seconds with boltcutters- either on the chain or on the padlock, and the thief will have stolen your bike. There are reasons why bike locks are designed the way they are- to stop/prevent this from happening.


4

A simple solution to part of your question -- that of scratching up your bike while removing the chain: I used to have a chain lock with a plastic sleeve, to prevent just this. You could probably find a similar sleeve in any hardware store, just use some inexpensive transparent tubing.


4

The site www.stolenbicycleregistry.com is a free resource to register and track stolen bicycles. The site covers USA and Canada, and allows you to register your bike as stolen, or check a bike that you want to buy to see if it has been reported. The following cities have Twitter feeds for their bikes: Tucson Seattle San Francisco Berkeley Chicago San ...


4

Take a look here for a nice bike lock guide, and make sure you browse the comments, there are some good info there as well. Also, there is this little trick my friend does... he has a good U-Lock but, he also uses a cheap chain lock. His reasoning is that the thief usually carries one specialized tool and would probably skip his bike, because it would ...


4

The short answer is, no: There's no simple way to protect against this with certainty if you want to leave your bike unattended. The same thing can happen to a car: you return and the wheels are gone, the car up on cinder blocks. Your question doesn't say where your bike was parked, but I'm guessing it was in a public area. It sounds to me like the thief ...


4

I feel your pain. The leisure centre have no liability whatsoever or requirement to put up signs saying so. Not only that, even if the CCTV covered your bike there is little likelihood that it would be checked. In part this is because of the time that the police would have to take to go through it. Due to the Data Protection Act you would not be able to go ...



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