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6

I think thats small enough that I probably wouldn't worry about it too much, but you can fill it in with a dab of super glue or sealants for rubber (like shoe goo) for peace of mind. You could boot it (a nice boot is the Park Tool TB-2), but I think this is likely too much work.


6

Air will escape, one of the biggest problems with Ghetto tubeless (unfortunate, but long established name for this technique) and not using specific tubeless ready or UST (tubeless standard) tires is that you need to inflate your tires a lot. At worst for every ride. The tires often do roll off the rim. Not every combination of Ghetto tubeless will work ...


5

There should be no flex. It's possible you haven't reinstalled the wheel correctly; and the axle is sliding around in the dropouts. If that's not the case, I assume you're talking about lateral wobble when you hold the bike frame still and wiggle the wheel rim. That indicates hub bearings in dire need of replacement. You say the wheel felt stiff before ...


4

I folded a dollar-bill and placed it between the tube and tire on my last set of tires. That lasted about four months before the tube finally pushed it's way out the tear and popped. Safest bet is to replace the tire. But in a pinch, the dollar-bill trick will at least get you home/to the bike shop.


3

Four possibilities (that I can think of off-hand): The tire itself is not properly seated on the rim. Let most of the air out and work the tire sideways back and forth with your hands to make sure it's well seated. Reinflate and spin the wheel and look at the junction between tire and rim. The tire should not appear to wobble up and down relative to ...


2

Unlike on a car tire, the sidewall isn't more important than the rest of the tire, really [ on a car tire, if the sidewall goes, you're going to blow out]. This link from Sheldon is good reading: "If you are mainly concerned with safety/function, there are only two reasons for replacing old tires: 1) When the tread is worn so thin that you start getting a ...


2

Oh yeah, definitely put some 28s on there. They'll give you better traction, better handling ( especially on most commutes ), and more comfort. Go for a nice, durable city tire. Whatever you do, don't try to save money on tires, spend a few extra dollars on high quality tires and you'll never look back. Nice tires will last longer, perform better, and save ...


2

Three things to check: 1, Is the bead seated correctly. It's pretty common to get tyres blowing off the rim if they're not seated correctly. That said, this usually leads to an exploding tube rather than the tyre just coming off 2, As Daniel R Hicks said, are the rims so worn they're expanding? 3, Check the rim for dings and warping as Malarky sort of says, ...


2

Most road frames aren't going to take tires beyond 28mm. There are exceptions. Cyclocross bikes will take wider tires. A 'cross bike makes a good commuter if it has mount points for fenders and a rack. Although tire width is a personal preference, the wider road tires are usually better for commuting on city streets. I run 35mm tires on my city bike. ...


2

Basically, you can run any width of tire that can safely clear the brakes and frame and which is not "too wide" for the rim. When considering brake/frame clearance you need to understand that a "wider" tire will not only be wider but "taller", so make sure that the outer circumference of the tire will not rub against the frame or the brake pivot (in the ...


1

Bigger tires means that you can run them at lower pressures while avoiding road hazard damage and increasing cushioning to give a better ride. They may be a bit less responsive or feel slower than some thinner tires, but this will not matter on a commute. Bigger tires also do better with heavier riders (23's require pretty high pressure for "heavy" riders to ...


1

Would you really want to ride on these tires that are falling apart? You need new tires. You may have to order. Biketiresdirect.com has 27s. Make certain the rim has no defects that prevent the tire bead from holding. Make certain the tires are seated all the way around the rim (pay particular attention to the area around the valve) and the tube is not ...


1

People patch tubless mountain bike tires all the time. You could use a slime tire patch kit, used frequently for Motorcycle, ATV, and Dirt Bike tires as those patches are a bit more durable than standard bike tube patches. It seems like all the amazon review are from mountain bikers. I've used a regular bike tube patch on the inside of the tire as well. ...


1

It depends. If the threads on the inside of the tyre are not damaged, only check for any left-over glass debris in the gash and leave as-is. Otherwise, either ditch the tyre or boot it from the inside, like @Batman suggested already.


1

If this issue persists (i.e. your tubes keep failing near the valve stem), then you likely have a "sharp" rim or burred valve hole. While you can try and file this down a bit, I've always found it simpler to get about 4cm x 2cm of old tube, cut a 5mm slice into it, and then push the valve through this. This will mean that you have tube => valve through old ...



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