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15

As a heavy rider personally, I don't have many issues with flats. A normal tire on the high/maximum pressure works fine to avoid pinch flats. The key is to check tire pressure every time you get on the bike. Even a day will allow a tire to soften 10 psi, and that will allow flats to occur. Road hazard flats are not avoidable except by avoiding the ...


7

I'd change it for a better tire, one that's much tighter on the rim. You inflated out to only 15 psi over its maximum. That kind of force could easily be generated in a quick turn with the brakes on. If the tire blows off in such a scenario, then you'll be underneath the vehicle you were trying to avoid. Go to your LBS, and explain that you want a ...


6

You don't need the nut, really (and its rather abnormal on Schrader valve tube) -- a lot of people just throw it away. The point of the nut is so that the tube's stem doesn't go into the rim when you're trying to inflate the tube and the stem doesn't move around when you're trying to pump the tire. Note that the tube can only go significantly into the rim ...


6

Let all the air out and work your hands around the tire, "breaking" the tire edge from the rim where it has stuck. Go around twice doing this. Then reinflate slowly, checking every few pumps to see if the tire is properly centered. If not, work it back to the center with your hands. Pay particular attention to the part of the tire right next to the rim ...


6

We don't do product rec here, but some general advice: You want to find the biggest tires you can fit into the bike, and run them at high pressure. The pressure written on the tire sidewall is useless (the maximum pressure depends on the rim and the tire), but in all likelihood you will be close to or exceeding it on many tires. The particular model of tire ...


6

Do a web search for tandem tires. A tandem bike carries two people, so typical loads are even bigger than you. Also, definitely use a pressure gauge. You may think you can tell by feel, but I ride every day and can't tell the difference between 80 and 100 psi.


5

This is close to my goto answer for tyre issues. Tyres designed for touring use are meant for higher loads and inflation pressures. I run marathon plus on my commuter hybrid. They make a 26x2.0 version which is rated to a load of 260lb per tyre and 70psi inflation (which you could probably exceed a little). It's possble that won't fit your rim (see ...


4

The markings on the tires for the pressures can be essentially ignored. They're a combination of marketing and legal departments coming up with essentially arbitrary numbers. Find a set of pressures that works for you so the tires are properly inflated -- it should prevent pinch flats, but keep rolling resistance low and absorb road hazards and ...


4

You need to check the clearance of the tires from the frame and fork (at the top of the fork, chainstays and seatstays primarily), and at the brakes if you are using rim brakes. Depending on the tires features (studs/knobs), they may have different clearance even if they are marketed as the same size, so you need to check it on a per tire basis. I'd ...


3

Those are called gumwalls. With this keyword you can easily search for them. Brands I see mounted on my friend's bikes are the likes of bontrager, panaracer, schwalbe, but Id say that most tyre manufacturers have a gumwall offer.


3

Also consider the Master Lock Street Cuffs handcuff lock. 2 lengths available and works well. Comes with a water bottle cage mount for the frame.


3

I'd guess the big apple will make it tight depending on what you lock to. Certainly the long shackle variants or standard shackle variants will fit around this. I have a Kryptonite New York Lock in a long shackle variant can fit around pretty much anything. When you get the bike, you can easily measure the width the lock needs to have along with the ...


2

The puff you hear when you disconnect is mostly air remaining in the pump hose, not the tire. The tube valves are very fast to reseal when you pop the pump off. Most quality tires have a range of pressures. Some controversy exists on the "best" pressure to run, the current thinking has folks running about 5psi under the upper limit. As someone earlier ...


2

It really depends on how much your budget is. Usually tires with lower rolling resistance comes a bit, if not alot, more expensive. Sk if you are just going for a pair that's cheap. I think it's best if you go for a 700x30. Since this one has the least amount of tire against the road. I'm also trying to figure out why you don't want to invest in another set ...


2

When I have a flat where I suspect an item stuck in the rubber of the tire but not sticking all the way through, I will look at the tire while stretching the rubber. Depending on the location of the piercing object that can be pushing against the inside of the tire with the fingers of one hand and pushing to the sides the rubber of the outside with the other ...


2

Panaracer Pasela PT are an excellent road/light touring tan sidewall tire, but they're lighter than the Marathon, which is more of a heavy duty loaded touring/urban tire. There's also the Rivendell Ruffy Tuffy, which are decent but I like the Pasela PT more. The Black/Tan version of the Michelin World Tour is in the same genre as the Marathon but not as ...


1

I loosely tighten before inflation- just to stop the valve from disappearing whilst inflating it. After inflation, it needs to be finger tight- else it will rattle on the rim. This is probably the number one reason why most people don't use them- the slightest looseness here will be very noisy (especially to deeper section wheels).


1

It is possible without replacing the tubes, if you have clearance for the tire. If you do have clearance, they should work just fine.


1

You could try converting your tyres to a tubeless system. I run much lower pressures on my tubeless mountain bike than I used to - they are super resistant to pinch flats. Every now and then I can feel the rear wheel pinching in a way that would previously have caused an instant flat but to date no flats (touch wood!). I find (anecdotal) that the tubeless ...


1

There appears to be confusion on this issue, I think the answer is here: Back tires wear out quicker than front tires. Therefore, someone wonders if they should be swapped to even out the wear. However, apparently front tire blowouts are more dangerous, so this is not a good idea (to have more worn out tires up front than back). But it is a good idea to ...


1

I've commuted (central London roads) for 2 years now on the same set of 25mm Gatorskins. I've had only one snakebite (my bad for not paying attention) and never (yes!) had a prick puncture with these tires. I've just (this week) switched to 28mm tubeless (Schwable Pro One). I built these tubeless for the Paris-Roubaix ride (notorious for pinch flats!). I ...


1

I doubt you're getting snake bites in a 22mm tyre unless it's very low on air. Even then it's not likely. Snake bites have a distinctive two-hole pattern so you can check. It's more likely that you're getting ordinary punctures. There may be tough 22mm tyres, but most this thin are designed to be light. There are certainly anti-puncture options at 25mm ...



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