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11

You are correct that the type of puncture you're getting is caused by the rim "pinching" the inner tube. The root cause here is one of the following: pressure too low (most likely) You're not avoiding potholes carefully enough Weight is too high for the tires/terrain. This has nothing to do with fixies except perhaps that people on fixies tend to ...


6

The things that will make a wheel more durable in this kind of service are: Bigger tires – the bigger the tire the more space you have to cushion an impact, bigger tires also mean that the load is more distributed. Since the bigger tire gives you more support you can also run a somewhat lower pressure which means that there is more flex in the tire before ...


5

Yes, it is time to change that tire! Your current front tire looks to be in very good shape so when you purchase a new tire you should put it on the front wheel and then move the old front tire onto the rear wheel. Continental road tires have helpful wear indicator dots on them that will show you when the tread of the tire has reached its recommended ...


4

You are asking about converting inner tubes to tubeless. As far as I know, tubeless system isn't 100% puncture proof, if you get a nail on the road, it's impossible to fix right away and you need to call a taxi. For me, inner tubes are still the best options for bike commuting. I can think of several ways: Purchase a bike pump with psi gause, so you can ...


4

I know there are a few answers here but they don't address the tonus solid or tubless. Here is you problem: I don't know exactly the amount of pressure, but always that I inflate the tires, are really "tight" you could say. "Tight" is not good enough. Check pressure without a gauge. Get a real pressure gauge. They are not expensive and inflate ...


4

I would say, you just didn't put the tire on well. When you inflate the tire to half its recommended pressure you should check that the tire seats well for the whole diameter around the rim on both sides. If it came out even a little, push it back in (may require some deflating). Otherwise the pressure may push the tire out like you had, and then the tube ...


4

I typed this whole answer and then decided to cut to the chase, which I doing here. IF you do not have a tiny splinter hidden in the tire I think you are pinching the tube between the tire and the rim during installation. This explains the flats at 50-60 lbs. Losing weight is not the problem. It might be part of the problem - that is to say that someone who ...


4

The significant numbers are the "50-559" which translate to 26" x 1.90" – my best guess is that what you're seeing is a molding problem that causes the '6' to look like a '5'. The 50-559 is the ISO size of the tire. The first number is the width (50 mm) and the second is the "bead seat diameter" (559 mm). Beware of 26" tires – there are two sizes that are ...


4

Ok there are a number of questions in there. 1) 29" vs 26": that's not a question of which would hold your weight better or worse. 29" rolls a bit better, especially over rough ground, so if that's important to you, then go for 29". A bike with a very small frame for a short person, will work better with smaller wheels - i.e. 26" - but at 5'7" I reckon ...


4

Running 23 mm tires on a rim width of 23 mm is insane -- your tires should be around to 40-50 mm. To summarize Sheldon Brown's page: Narrow tire on wide rim = pinch flats + damage from road hazards (which is the case you are in) Wide tire on narrow rim = sidewall damage + rim failure and bad handling You need to get a narrower rim for the bike (or ...


3

It depends on what type of tubeless standard you are using. UST UST rims are designed to be able to be inflated with a floor pump. The rim profile has an inner channel. The tyre bead should be placed in this as per the picture when you begin inflating the tyre. When it reaches a high enough pressure it pops into place and you can continue to seat it ...


3

Firstly, you are one impressively persistent woman! Yes, of course weight is a factor. You just need equipment that will deal with it. In addition to the points made by jqning, I'm thinking that several things can help you Larger and better tires would help. I checked out the Electra website, but couldn't be sure which bike you have. Some do have bigger ...


3

The tire brand alone won't help. Over the years bike makers and tire makers have invented an amazing range of sizes. It keeps us on our toes… I'd guess that the tires you found at Walmart were 26 x 1.375 (or some other decimal size). You'd think that 1.375 and 1 3/8 inches would be the same. Alas, they are not. This question, Why does a decimal sized 26“ ...


3

I would try buying a set of 28mm tires (or larger). You can run them at a lower pressure than a 23mm or 25mm and doing so won't likely cause the bite puncture you are experiencing b/c the air chamber is much larger and thus has more area to compress before it nips at the tube. An upside is that the ride quality is far superior to say, a 23mm. Also, make ...


2

I ride a fixie for city commuting in a city full bad of roads and the advice I can give is Buy a good pair of tires. I use Maxxis Re-Fuse and can't complain at all, they are pretty strong and not expensive (they aren't cheap though), I've ride them literally over broken bottle shards and survived. Some friends of mine have Black Mamba tires and they seem ...


2

Bikes don't have enough speed / surface area to hydroplane. A slick does as good as tread in the rain.


2

Wow this is the flat tire question that just keeps on rolling In review: Installed a cheap 26 X 1.25 Problems from day one Patched tire with tire and even more problems exactly where the tire patch was Installed another cheap 26 X 1.25 and put in preemptive complete tire patch using the last 1.25 and nothing but problems Stop using: Cheap ...


2

Most inner tubes do not cover an exactly specific size such as 25c or 28c or anything like that. Any tube I've ever used has had something of a variety of tyre sizes which they can mold too. For instance, with the size you're looking for, you would most likely find tubes rated to fit size 23c-28c, possibly even something like 25c-30c. I myself have 28c ...


1

Yes. Here's a tire size to rim width chart from Schwalbe.


1

According the Sheldon need 25mm for a 2.1" A downhill wheel tends to be strong (and heavier)


1

If you don't have a compressor, you can use a CO2 cartridge (or two or three) inflator to quickly give that burst of air/CO2 that you need to seat the tubeless. It's very difficult with a floor pump. [] Source: Wikimedia commons


1

Permutube are not good to ride on Middle ground is a heavier puncture resistant tire if you are running racing tires Spare tubeS, tire patch, tube patches, and a pump. Tubeless has a lower risk of failure but field repair is harder (you can put a tube in a tubeless).


1

Sounds like your pump fitting is in schrader configuration. Locate the pump instructions and verify/modify the pump-head.


1

Practice with a spare tube outside of the tyre. You'll see it start to inflate on one or two pumps. Could it be the pump you're using locks-on the other way? When its clamped down you should not be able to feel air moving out the end, around the valve. Possibly your pump is a schrader-only style? There are wee thread-on adapters that let you use a ...


1

They say they take 65 psi, but I've had them pop at 55-60, so I keep them at 45psi, 50 if I can get away with it, and sometimes 35-40 if I'm using my little hand pump Well, there's your problem. 40 PSI is just not enough pressure for a 1.25" tire, especially if it's carrying a lot of weight. You're probably getting pinch flats from hitting potholes and ...


1

I'm not sure weight is the main issue. There are several questions on this site from people weighing more than you, and the general advice seems to be that it should be fine. Sure, more weight puts bike under more stress, but bikes are generally fairly sturdy. But make sure that there are no missing spokes, and check regularly if there are cracks in the rim ...


1

Learn how to bunny hop. When you're heading over a pothole you don't have to jump it, but apply the same idea of shifting your weight to be nice to the tires. When you approach a curb, you lift the front wheel as best you can (I can't actually do a bunny hop) and then shift your weight to it before the back wheel hits.


1

Stans No Tubes and other tubeless systems with sealant will provide you much greater resistance to both "puncture" flats from glass, nails etc, AND from "pinch flats" or "snakebites". The sealant will seal holes from quite large nails or other debris and the tubeless tyre can't really get a pinch flat because there is no tube inside it to pinch. Having ...


1

Nashbar's specs for the rim list the inner width as 16mm. http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_566766_-1___ (click the "Specs" link) This is a fairly standard width for road wheels, so you should be able to safely run any common road tire size (21mm-35mm give or take a few mm).


1

For shorter stem presta valves in deep rims the trick to fill air is to first deflate the tyre about 50%, then push the pump head onto the stem with one hand while at the same time pushing the stem through the rim from the tyre side with your other hand. Then use the lever to get a good seal. When you pump it up, the increase in pressure in the head of the ...



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