Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Yes, it's normal. The higher pressure (eg 100 psi, 6-7 bar) of the tires can squeeze stones out quite quickly. And, yes, sometimes they can hit nearby cars, cyclists, dogs, cats, ... . Ride on :-)


4

I suspect that your brakes are misaligned & are rubbing on the tire. The brake pad should be centered on the rim braking surface, look closely & you will likely see that the pad contacts the tire when the lever is pulled. Not only does the pad touching the tire wear out the sidewall, but it also generates heat which damages the tire & inner tube ...


4

Liquid Nitrogen boils at -196 Degrees Celsius (321 degrees Fahrenheit) and is cold enough that rubber will become brittle. Its probably not a good idea as I am fairly sure the the brittle rubber tube will not hold the pressure created as the liquid Nitrogen boils. View before you do it. and if you decide to go ahead, ring the emergency room before hand ...


3

If you at the Sheldon Brown tire width chart, you can see that there's only 1 width listed where 23 and 32 are recommended. On that page, he says using too narrow a tire can result in pinch flats and rim damage. If you think about the extreme case, where the width of the rim is almost as wide as the tire flattened out, then you wouldn't have much cushion ...


3

Go 25 or better 28mm: the rolling resistance will be lower for the same pressure as your 23s - or you can reduce pressure a bit on the 25 or 28s for comfort and the same rolling resistance as the 23s - and still with the bigger tyre not get pinch punctures. There's lots on the web about going for bigger tyres - a lot of racers are now going for 25s!


3

I have a pump with what looks like an identical head. Here's the instruction pdf that they provide. The instructions provided are as follows. Remove the dust cap from the tire valve. For Presta valves, unscrew locking nut at the end of the valve. Wipe off any mud or dirt from the outside surface of the valve stem; this ensures the pump's Clever Head ...


3

I really like some of the WTB tires. Specifically the Bronson and the Weirwolf. It's tough to find a tire that's going to do it all, but I think WTB is a good mix between weight and durability. I also really like the traction of those two tires in a lot of varying conditions. When you say "they wear out too quickly" how quickly are we talking? How many ...


2

Says on the sidewall of a tyre. Mine says between 40-60psi. They also have it in 'bars' if you like to measure in that. Check out an example here http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/schwalbe-magic-mary-evo-mtb-tyre-super-gravity/rp-prod118255 Says max 50psi.


2

Ah the wonderful world of tire sizes, where nothing is what it seems! There are multiple size systems (French, fractional, decimal, ISO), and only ISO/ETRTO, the "international standard" is (somewhat) consistent. Unfortunately, many people don't use the ISO/ETRTO system. The definitive guide to tire sizes is Sheldon Browns' site: ...


2

Sorry to revive an old thread, but I have the same wheelset. At first, I was losing up to half the pressure withing 12 hours. I started with 1 ounce of sealant in each tire. After a week, I added another ounce, and the tires lost maybe the same amount over a 24 hour period. Not bad, that is the rate for my latex tubulars But lately, the front tire is now ...


2

Most bike mechanics will tell you that the best performance is not attained at maximum tyre pressure. My own tyres take up to 4.5 bar, yet the best ride is at around 2.5 bar. For whatever reason, my bike rolls better in the terrrain at 2.5 bar than at 3 bar.


1

Check to make sure there's no movement in the brake or pads under real life braking conditions. If something is loose, the brake will pivot around where it's mounted on the fork crown causing the pads to move upward under harsh braking conditions. Such a problem might not be apparent when if you are just looking at the problem on the repair stand. Put some ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible