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10

It sounds like your pump is not on the valve properly, so instead of inflating the tire you're just pressurizing the inside of your pump. Does your bike have Schrader valves (the kind you see on a car) or Presta valves (skinnier, with a kind of pointy top)? If it has Presta valves, make sure the top of the valve is unscrewed. There's a little nut that you ...


8

As the comments have comprehensively pointed out, solid tyres have some significant problems. I recently fitted a solid tyre from Tannus on my bike with the same goals as yours. I only managed to last a few weeks before I couldn't deal with the problems and refitted my standard tyres. Pros No flat tyres! Cons Rough ride - the ride quality was awful. ...


8

Gravel tires are normally a little knobby: versus completely smooth for a road tire. One strategy is to run a gravel or combination tire in the front and a road tire in the back. A combination tire is one which is nearly slick in the middle with knobs on the sides, so you might want to try one road tire on the back and one gravel tire on the front. ...


8

One of the reviews has something interesting to say These 27" and 26" tires are made to fit older 10 speed/english racer type bikes. You should remember that the 26"x1-3/8" size predates the MTB era by at least three decades, they came first. If you have an old Raleigh three speed or a 1970s Peugeot then these are the tires you need in the ...


7

Your sliding out at 5mph wasn't because the tires were slicks, it was for some other reason. They were either lousy tires, improperly installed, rider error, or some other factor. If you are riding on the road, there is no need for any kind of tread. Slicks are perfectly fine, despite your thoughts from your previous experience. In fact, they are ideal, and ...


7

If you are riding on the road, you don't need treads. Even with mud. Even with sand, or gravel. Unless you are riding on the street in the middle of a volcanic mudslide or torrential rain washing out the road, it won't matter. The curved cross section of your tires coupled with your mass will instantly cut right through any patches of water or mud as you ...


7

It sounds as though your problem was a somewhat loose tyre not properly seated. It may have been loose enough that it couldn't be properly seated, but in that case I'd expect it to pop off and the tube explode while you were pumping it up for the first time. You may also be running the tyres at too low a pressure, with a skinny tyre like that I'd expect them ...


6

I commute on two bicycles: — a road bike, with 25mm tire up front and a 28mm back. — a custom commuter bike, with 32mm up front, 35mm back. I'd recommend you go with the 32mm tires. The 28mm tires I've used are good for commuting (I think the 25mm I have is too small — I have to give it too much attention when crossing curb lines and such). That said, ...


5

Cheapest, safest and most practical option option would be to sell and buy a second hand bike. For instance I just sold and old, but perfectly usable full suspension MTB that originally cost about $US3500 in 1995 for $US60.00. The buyer got a bargain and I got some space back in my garage. Look for someone who wants some garage space back.... If however ...


5

It does not look to me like the cords are damaged, which means the tire will still have its strength to hold the air pressure of the tube. You have three easy options. Personally I would take the last: Ignore it. It will probably last until the tire has no tread left. The cut itself will bulge a little, so this will be the point of failure of the tire. ...


3

Look for city or touring tires. Road in bicycle means more of a racing tire. A tire like this go pavement and packed nicely Travel CONTACT. Almost all manufacturers will have tires like this. A road type tread in the middle but a little grip on the edges for if you do sink a little. Great answer from Batman (+1) but I don't think the Gravel Plus is ...


3

Those tires should work just fine. Any of the MTB slick tires listed on that site would work well with your bike and current rims. You can get too small a tire on too wide a rim, but it takes a much bigger jump than from 2" to 1.5 or so. There is a very conservative guide on Sheldon Brown's bike pages. http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html Given your ...


3

But there is not one traction If you have surface that does not slip like asphalt or cement then you want maximum contact. A slick. That is why Nascar does it. If you have a surface that does slip like gravel or dirt then you want a tire that grabs. Tread or knobs. Mud is whole different beast. Water has basically no traction. Hydroplane is a ...


3

It's not about energy to accelerate the bike to speed, but the energy to keep it there. For bicycles the kinetic energy is a small part of the total power output of the rider (typically under 10m/s = 36km/hour and 100kg, and e=1/2 m v² = .5 * 100 * 10² = 5000J or watt-seconds. So a casual rider putting out 250W could reach 36kph in 20 seconds, assuming no ...


3

Have had a Trek FX 7.2 for 6 years. Came with 35's. Replaced with 32's. Work very well for pavement. If you are doing any curb jumping or cobblestone, I would not suggest the 28's. If you are looking at a Trek hybrid (love mine), consider a carbon fork model. Mine is all metal and I feel the vibrations in my forearms. That is the ONLY bad thing I have to ...


2

Based on the title alone 32mm tires are not ideal for fast commuter bike. But that picture is some harsh conditions and you state safety is important. For that picture and the pictures you had on the fork question I would go 32mm or even 35mm. A 35mm is not not going to be as fast but it should be softer and have more grip. And also which type of tire. ...


2

You assume the whole leak is the valve. Rubber is not air tight. Most of the leak is through the rubber. Clearly can create a near airtight valve. And with enough rubber a near air tight tube. But it would be heavy. Just pump your tires once a week. I see the link said pump daily. OK, at least once a week. On my road bike I pump before every ride.


2

Like many comments, it sounds like it's at least partially related to a change in tire pressure. There's also the external change in tire tread that could contribute to the sound change. If you listen to a large knob tire on a road versus a small knob one, they sound totally different. Your tread might be starting to wear, thus giving a different sound. The ...


2

The protective layer is known as "rim tape". The old tube shouldn't remain within the tire - the only thing inside the rim should be the rim tape and the new tube. You may have different tire pressures than before - have you tried playing with them?


2

You have 26" tyres currently, there are certainly "slicker" options available to you. I think its quite easy to obtain tyres which go down to about 1.25" wide. This is not the crazy narrow 23mm (or less) that you might typically see on a road bike (and really, these bikes can only be ridden on the road), but on tarmac/asphalt you'll certainly notice a ...


2

Zero maintenance is just not going to happen. A bicycle has a many moving parts. Chains, gears, and bearings. Go for a puncture resistant tire. An example is the Schwalbe Marathon Plus.


2

Pull the tire. Don't just clear it of substantial debris - clear it of all debris. If there is something in there it will work though the cords. If you are into the cord then still do not give up as that is a decent tire. From the inside if you can see damage to the cord then time to get a new tire. While you have it off pull the front and rotate. ...


1

You don't need to be too worried about it. From my own preference in the past, if the tire plies are not exposed, tires with mere surface damages can still last a very long time. Rubber is sturdier than what most people think. I ride a CX on MTB trails and get tires scuffed all the time. Especially if you are not doing anything intense (I assume because ...


1

Not really an answer, but I put it here to separate it from the comments about using a decent track pump... Daniel R Hicks makes a good point about the cracks - they seem to be between the tread and sidewall. This suggests to me that there are two different rubber compounds that aren't "mating" well. According to a few mechanics I know, Schwalbe have had ...


1

Three possibilities that I see You did not suddenly lose air you just did not notice until you got to the cobble stone The rubber tube failed and recovered The valve failed and recovered No so sure you had a sudden loss of air. If the tire when from 90 psi to 20 psi in a short period of most likely you would have heard that. Since the valved is the ...


1

If you're commuting on roads, there are plenty of good tires with kevlar belts for puncture protection (e.g. Schwalbe Marathon line). Slicks are ideal for roads since you don't need tread - this is a good page to read about the topic. You don't say how you got the flats though, so it is possible you had a bad valve or inadequate rim tape or underinflation, ...


1

I have done quite a bit of touring on my Surly Long Haul Trucker which includes 1,000 + kilometres of dirt riding 1. On my Surly for such tours I fitted Schwalbe Marathon Mondial HS 428 47-622 tyres and prior to that for an early tour again with a fair bit of dirt roads I fitted Schwalbe Marathon Cross HS 334 700Cx38. Both tyres have proven to be more than ...


1

An alternative way to calculate the solution: The pressure in the tyre is 100psi. Pressure equals force divided by area. The surface area inside the inner tube (for a 700x23c tyre) is (very) roughly 7.2cm x 210cm = 1512cm square [or in square inches = 234insq]. The total forces involved on an unladen wheel are therefore 100 ‘pounds per square inch’ x 234 ...


1

I have now had a road bike for 3 days since i transferred from mountain biker to road biker. I've done just over 50 miles and my experiences so far would be both bikes have pros and cons. The mountain bike is a LOT slower. The width of the tyres being thicker means more surface contact with the road and it slows you down and requires way more effort to ride ...


1

I prefer the feel of tubeless tires. Using the same tire, there is less rolling resistance by removing the tube.



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