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6

You can easily inflate a completely flat tire (provided the tube is still good). Usually, when a tire is completely flat, you have to press the back of the tire so that the valve doesn't recess into the tire so your pump can be attached properly to it. With a presta valve, you can use your mouth for this (well, on a clean tube, since the valve stem isn't ...


5

Yes, those are wear indicators. The change is noted by retailers: Note: Continental has added wear indicators to all Continental Gatorskin tires. These small divots in the tread surface are intentional and are not a sign of a factory defect. Once the rubber wears to the point where the divots are no longer discernible, you'll know it's time to ...


4

If your tyre says 700x28c, that means your wheel has 700c of diameter and your tyre is size 28. You should buy a tube that perfectly fits this, and this is very easy as because tubes have, in the box, the diameter of the wheel they were made for, in your case 700c, and the range of the tires they are made for. So if the tube says 24-26 that is ok for you, if ...


3

The cracks will expose the internal structure to elements. So yes, they are not going to last as long as non-cracked ones but very probably not going to explode right away either. The Nokia tires that used to be popular in my country developed cracks between tread and sidewall after a few months' use and could still be ridden for years afterwards. Your ...


3

What you want for road use is slick tires -- tread and knobs are bad for road use. You have 26" (ISO 559) rims, so you need 26 x (something) tires where (something) is a number in decimal form (e.g. 1.75). Going for smaller tires will lower the bike a bit, and smaller tires have to be run at higher pressure (so you'll get less cushioning). There will also ...


2

700x23 and 700x23C and 700C x 23 and 700x23c and 700x23c all mean the same size of tire.


1

How much clearance do you have on the front wheel? Doesn’t look like you can fit much more than 25mm width there. With your weight and luggage I’d go as wide as possible. Maybe 25mm in the front and 28mm in the back (if the brake has enough clearance). Of course it also depends on the quality of the roads.


1

It is possible. For typical mountain rims, the low limit is somewhere around 28mm. Some differences from mounting narrower tires are following: Less cushioning from tires: Smaller tires can not absorb as much shock from from curbs, cracks in the pavement, etc. On the other hand, smaller tires can be made with more flexible casing and absorb small ...


1

Generally, if fairly new tires start to crack, they were poor quality tires to begin with. That's a red flag on its own. Don't use them. Bicycles only have two tires between you and the ground, that means if your only front tire fails at speed the chances are good that you're going to end up on the ground. Without a definitive image of the damage, damaged ...


1

Make sure the valve isn't stuck. If it's been sitting that long it probably is. Look at the valve and you'll see a pin in the middle. This pin needs to be depressed for the valve to open and allow air into the tube. Press down on it with a ball point pen, screwdriver tip or similar object to unstick it. Then follow the advice above about holding the tube in ...


1

You mention "It fit a bit big so I just shrugged it off and kept it". If the tube is the correct size for the tire, it should fit without needing to fold, shrug nor stretch. When you install the tube, it is advised to inflate it just enough for it to take shape, and no more. If you put too much air in a tube that is outside a tire, there is nothing ...


1

I've glued hundreds of tubulars and learned the craft from some of the best mechanics in the sport including a former wrench with the Motorola team and a former Mavic Service Course mechanic. These days tubulars are really only used in cyclocross, track and at the very top level of the sport. There are some very distinct downsides: Safety. Improperly ...


1

An easy answer directly from Schwalbe website: http://www.schwalbe.com/en/profil.html "Many MTB tires are marked with a “FRONT” and a “REAR” arrow. The “FRONT” arrow indicates the recommended rolling direction for the front wheel and respectively the “REAR” arrow is the direction for the rear wheel."


1

I terms of the "am I too heavy for my tires?" question, you can look for the specs on the tire maker's site. Schwalbe publishes a rated load for their tires, I'd expect that other reputable makers do as well. As a point of reference their Marathon Plus tire is rated for a load of up to 90 kg / 198 pounds in a 32-622 size (probably at 6.55 bar / 95 psi). ...



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