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6

You can easily inflate a completely flat tire (provided the tube is still good). Usually, when a tire is completely flat, you have to press the back of the tire so that the valve doesn't recess into the tire so your pump can be attached properly to it. With a presta valve, you can use your mouth for this (well, on a clean tube, since the valve stem isn't ...


4

If your tyre says 700x28c, that means your wheel has 700c of diameter and your tyre is size 28. You should buy a tube that perfectly fits this, and this is very easy as because tubes have, in the box, the diameter of the wheel they were made for, in your case 700c, and the range of the tires they are made for. So if the tube says 24-26 that is ok for you, if ...


3

What you need is a valve core (provided the stem is threaded to take a removable valve core) [The question is, what happened to the original one?] The cheapest option and easiest option is to just buy a new tube.


2

If you have an e-bike with a rear hub-motor (and with the battery pack over the rear tire), you should note that you have considerable unsprung weight on that rear tire. You should try to make sure that you have the tires properly inflated -- on the high end of the maximum PSI the tire can handle. Try to ask your LBS when you're replacing the tire what type ...


1

Make sure the valve isn't stuck. If it's been sitting that long it probably is. Look at the valve and you'll see a pin in the middle. This pin needs to be depressed for the valve to open and allow air into the tube. Press down on it with a ball point pen, screwdriver tip or similar object to unstick it. Then follow the advice above about holding the tube in ...


1

An easy answer directly from Schwalbe website: http://www.schwalbe.com/en/profil.html "Many MTB tires are marked with a “FRONT” and a “REAR” arrow. The “FRONT” arrow indicates the recommended rolling direction for the front wheel and respectively the “REAR” arrow is the direction for the rear wheel."


1

You mention "It fit a bit big so I just shrugged it off and kept it". If the tube is the correct size for the tire, it should fit without needing to fold, shrug nor stretch. When you install the tube, it is advised to inflate it just enough for it to take shape, and no more. If you put too much air in a tube that is outside a tire, there is nothing ...


1

There is more to tire set-up than just puncture proof. Many are also interested in tire suppleness, traction and rolling resistance. Tubeless tires are the in thing at the moment because tubeless construction take material away (aka the the tube) and allows lower pressures, which results in a more supple tire, that has more traction and often less rolling ...


1

Tufo makes tubular clinchers. Clement made something similar in the eighties, called the Ritmo, I believe. I don't think Continental does, I'm pretty sure they're just regular clincher tires. You can ride tubular tires on clincher rims in an emergency, but they'll roll off the wheel if you're not very careful in the corners.


1

If you replace the tyre with a tough (kevlar belted) touring tyre this is likely to deal with debris punctures. These are more likely if the tyre is quite compressed as it rolls because of the flatter contact patch. In addition a touring tyre will be able to run at a higher maximum pressure than a similarly-sized city / general-purpose tyre as was probably ...



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