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10

No you will not be able to use your 700x23c tire on a 650c rim. The bead seat diameter of 700c rims is 622mm, this will also be the bead diameter of the your 700x23c tire. The bead seat diameter of a 650c rim is 571mm (see Velocity's Spec section). Your 700x23c tire will be 51mm too wide.


5

As an owner of both 650c and 700c-wheeled bikes will happily share my thoughts. First of all, 650c wheels are lighter and obviously smaller which makes the whole ride more dynamic which can improve your maneuverability. On the other hand, 650c wheels are prone to sliding on stones or corners so you must be more careful when riding. 650c wheels spin faster ...


3

There are multiple types of valve extension: The extenders you have relocate the valve core. The other kind are a plain tube which tapers with a similar profile to a normal valve, and screws onto the valve, over the existing valve core. Once the tyre is inflated you can remove the extension and tighten the valve-lock-nut.


3

As I've said in other answers, the right tire pressure function of you and your bike and your terrain. You'll have to play with the tire pressure to balance the ride quality.Just because the tire says pressure x on the sidewall doesn't mean it makes any sense running the tire at that pressure since it might just give a bouncy ride which compromises your ...


2

Yes, absolutely. Spend an extra 20 dollars on good tires and you could save yourself 30 dollars worth of tubes. Plan on spending somewhere around 40 to 50 dollars a tire. Even if tubes were free, the money is worth saving the hours spent on the side of the road dealing with flats. Look for tires in the 'training' or 'commuting' category, for extra puncture ...


2

Its extremely unlikely for an inner tube to just burst. It sounds like you are suffering from punctures. There are two types of puncture; the first is an object penetrating the tire and inner tube, and the second is a 'pinch' puncture where an impact causes the inner tube to be pinched between the tire and rim. Many bikes (even expensive ones) come with ...


2

You can confirm tyre fit using the ETRTO spec, which should be specified on the sidewalls of your Kendas and the tyres that were previously fitted. the format is ww-ddd where ww is the nominal tyre width (often measured at the widest point when fitted to the manufacturer's test rim, rather than at the tread) in millimetres, and ddd is the bead diameter ...


2

Yeap- no reason not to. I do the same on my mountain bike, I prefer the width of the wider rear to enable stability/grip whilst the front is just wide enough to steer in the direction. Most inner tubes will work over quite a range of tyre sizes & the same for rims. Make sure you check the specification of both if you are concerned.


2

There are a few things to do. I'd start by reading this link from Sheldon Brown. 1) First determine how the flats are occurring. Inspect the tube. Is the rim tape on the rim properly? (if not, you'll see a puncture on the wheel side) Is the tube being pinch flatted? (a snakebite flat, two very closely placed punctures - usually a sign of too low pressure) ...


1

You can mix and match tire sizes if you want - its relatively common. You just need to make sure that the tires fit on the rim and to a lesser extent are not too thin or too wide for the rim. This is often done for different tire clearances in the front and back, for example.


1

As stated in this answer or this link, the idea was originally that there were 700A,700B,700C tires+wheels which all had an outer diameter of 700 mm with A tires being the thinnest and C tires being the thickest (so A had the largest rim and C had the smallest rim). Eventually, the C variant won out, and people varied the outer diameter by mounting different ...


1

I also would recommend finding tubes with valves of the correct length. However, if that fails, I've had success using a presta to schrader adapter. Often with shorter valves, there won't be enough room to attach a pump head, but there will be enough to attach an adapter, which you can then use a pump that works with schrader valves. Most pumps have the ...


1

The rims spec'd with a lot of new Trek bikes (including yours) are "Tubeless ready". This means that you can run tubeless, but you can also run regular old tires with tubes (i.e. clinchers). The primary advantage of running a tubeless tire (which will be marked as tubeless) is that you can run a lower pressure without getting pinch flats, which is ...


1

Yes, better tires can help prevent punctures. It has already been mentioned that there are tires specifically made to enhance puncture resistance. One thing that has not been mentioned is that better tires also have stronger sidewalls to offer more tire support when going over bumps and thus better protect against pinch flats. (Once, I had a cheap tire with ...


1

Some general advice: The bend/wobble is likely nothing to worry about and you can search this site or Google for how to true a wheel. If there's less than 1mm of un-true-ness, I wouldn't even worry about truing it. A new wheelset will likely cost more than the bike, and since it sounds like you have a perfectly good one on the bike already it's hard to ...



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