New answers tagged

6

Your bike had these tyres as stock in 2015 Cross 40c Front - Cross 40c Rear according to http://www.tredz.co.uk/.Merida-Crossway-40-2015-Hybrid-Sports-Bike_74298.htm 2014 version was listed as Tyres: Cross 700 40C So you have a 700c rim which can take a 40mm wide tyre. Confirm this by looking at the sidewall of the tyres, it should say 622-40 or 40-622 ...


0

I've got this exact case on my road bike. 23mm tyres were too horrible, 25 were better, so I went to a 28mm tyre and I have about 1.5 mm of space between the brake bridge and the rolling outside of the tyre. And its not caused a single problem in 500 km of riding to date. The only way it could cause a problem is if your tyre was bulging from being off ...


8

The QR interface is designed such that the axle is fully seated in the dropouts before engaging the QR. The QR engagement should be firm, but it is not designed to hold the wheel in the way you describe. Dangers of trying to do what you suggest are: Severely over-tightening the QR (which you may need to do to keep the wheel in place) could potentially ...


2

A cheap solution: regular Duc-tape works really well. Put a separate piece over each hole, in case you need to replace a spoke. I've also used it to tape the rim tape directly to the wheel when an old one broke.


1

The word is SPRUE and can present as a short rubber "hair" 1-2 milimetres thick, or a long thin straggy line around the tyre, somewhat like a fish fin. If your rim tyre is too narrow for your tyre then its possible for the edge of the rim to wear on the tyre. This could produce threads that really are thread, instead of rubber. I've never seen this on ...


-2

Those are three different sizing standards First one is 20mm inner tube diameter and 622-630mm inner wheel diameter Second one is inner wheel diameter of 27inches and inner tube diameter of 3/4 - 1 inch Third is rather more confusing. The 20 and 25 refer to the inner diameter of the tube in mm. The 700c is a measure of the diameter of the wheel but c is ...


10

I figured out a solution. The thing that is supposed to stop the inner tube from expanding into spoke holes is called a rim tape. The tape that came with the bike is really flimsy. I'll purchase and apply a high pressure rim tape. Hopefully that would fix the problem. Update: I've decided to go for a cotton rim tape as they're more durable than rubber ...


5

If this helps at all, I used a set of Marathon Plus tires on a cross-Canada tour last year (8200km), plus a bunch of commutting, totaling about 11,000km. I did not get any flats at any point, but by the end of that distance, the rear tire was pretty bald and I decided to stop using it. Here's a picture of the tires around 10,000km, front tire on the left ...


1

I replace mine when I start getting punctures. That's normally some time after I have a strip of blue all the way round, and before there's more than just odd spots of black showing through the blue. I've done that with several of them, and it seems to be pretty consistent. But as Steve says, four or five years might also be a good time to replace them, but ...


3

In my experience, tires should be replaced after 4-5 years, regardless of # of miles/KM. The rubber dries out, cracks, and it is easier for debris to puncture old rubber.


0

If you have got a loose area of tyre next to the valve, you need to 'distribute' this looseness to some other part of the rim. Put a screw-driver across the rim under the tyre, and roll it around the rim away from the valve. The screwdriver will slip on the metal rim, but grip the tyre, so it will revolve. Do this for both loose areas, each side of the ...


0

The tyre slime is particularly good at sealing pin-prick holes... I bought a new ride on mower, and within half an hour got a puncture on the front 2 ply tyre.... I then installed the supplied Goo, and it sealed the leak. After 3 years of cutting grass (next to Hawthorn Hedges) the front tyres finally needed some air, so I took them off to find the new ...


0

I can from recent experience tell you that if you ride on the road, slicks make a big and positive difference. Noise is reduced, speed is increased, handling is as good if not better. I feel safe and don't work as hard. I went with wide ones just a bit less than the knobblies I replaced. But from what I have read, thinner ones are better, which makes sense ...


-1

Had the same problem—the trick is that the threaded sleeve at the very tip of the valve needs to be unthreaded and floating free in order for the valve to work under the pressure of incoming pumped air. So the order of operation is: valve cap off ensure the valve stem collar nut is seated snug against the surface of the wheel spin the tiny threaded sleeve ...


-1

Using the scraping tool or sandpaper to abrade the patch area may also leave the tube thinner. When inflated the thinner area stretches and may allow air to leak. You might have to stick the (temporarily) inflated tube under water to find these tiny leaks. Scrape sparingly, and the tube may still have plenty of life left. I am still riding a tube with six ...


0

I think I just found the answer from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Reifengr%C3%B6%C3%9Fen-beim-Fahrrad.png: So: The diameter at the outer is 700mm, it is 42mm wide at the outer, 622mm is the inner diameter


1

As well as checking for debris in the tyres, applying the patch properly etc., you need to be careful not to give yourself a "pinch flat" when you put the tyre back on the rim. This is caused when you trap the tube between the tyre and the rim, putting a fresh hole in your recently repaired tube.


-3

In short: Patching a tyre is only temporary and should only be used to get back home after which it should be replaced. Long Version: There are many reasons why patch may fail. Some of which may include the adhesive and rubber patch quality as these may be very cheap patches. I generally never use any of the cheap patches that you can get out of the dollar/...


1

I'd like to introduce another axis: Tire material. Soft grippy material vs. Hard less grippy material. The Soft grippy material has the advantages on grippiness, smoother riding, less rolling resistance, but has the disadvantages of getting more flats (for the same thickness of material) and of wearing out faster. The reason for getting more flats for ...


1

You should use the tyres that fit the rims on your bike. If you were a professional you'd use whatever your sponsor told you to, so that's a bit of a side issue. Tubulars are back in the MTB world, but they're still rare and it's unlikely your bike has them. I suggest not buying a tubular wheelset, let your sponsors do that when they decide it's a good idea....


3

The hardest to fit tyres I've ever dealt with were continental comfort contact (and I run marathon plus which are reputed to be difficult). Like yours they needed serious overpressure to seat, even after wetting the rim. After several years fitted they're still going strong. I had to change a tube in one recently and it was much easier but still hard to ...


3

Training tyres are somewhere in the product line below race tyres but above economy tyres. They should cost around the same as a touring or commuting tyre, cost less than a race tyre, and will cost more than a budget tyre. Training tyres will have more durability than a race tyre, but will be slightly heavier. The idea is to save your valuable race rubber ...


6

The difference in rolling resistance is small but can be seen in time trial results and maybe in mass start races. The more noticeable difference is that typically race tires have smoother ride because the thinner casing transmits less vibration. Note that the categories are not clear and one manufacturer's tire marketed as training tire may have less ...


6

Those strings are quite common with continental tires and seem to be a part of their manufacturing process. Every continental tire I have owned seem to have some of those threads, even ones that mounted relatively easily. I just cut them off and have never had an issue with them. Continental tires are also well known for their tight beads. The high-pressure ...


0

I have had several rear tyres fail this way (most recently a Schwalbe racing ralph) Oddly the tyre "cuts" perfectly align with the spokes in a diagnonal away from each spoke. I ride a lot of canal paths so the crusty dry dust makes these patterns on the sidewall even when the tyre is brand new. I am wondering whether the spokes cause a vortex that carries ...


6

It looks as though you're confused about the range of allowed tyres on the rim vs the tube. What connects the two is the size of the tyre you actually have. There are two independent ranges. The rim is rated to take tyres in the range 28 to 38mm wide. Your tyre will be an exact size, and ideally should be within that range. You can measure the width or ...



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