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Using 23mm tires on commuter for several years and feeling excellent, don't see any need to increase the size. Always commuting on asphalt only. Very seldom getting out on gravel and it is not that bad too. Used Kenda, Panaracer, Michelin (Pro3 and Pro4) and Continental (4000). Michelin remain the distant favourite among all - the most sticky and ...


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It's worth noting that tire weight will affect the amount of work you have to do. It's most noticeable when changing from worn to new tires, but I'm kind of regretting fitting 28s because my old 25s were lighter. You have to maintain the rotating inertia of your tires, so it's not just rolling resistance, but also tire and rim weight that will affect the ...


1

Using an axle much smaller than the hole it fits into is sure to end badly. However, you can make up the difference with a sleeve bushing. Maybe you can find a standard size bushing that fits well, or maybe you'll need to invent one e.g. from copper plumbing pipe. If you want to try the pipe approach, use 3/8" copper surrounded by 1/2" copper and you ...


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Hit the tires with a bush and some concentrated soap. In the dark shine a light on them and you would be surprised how much they shine even if they look dirty. Once you scuff em up bad then just time for new tires.


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New bikes at the very least require a full check and tune up out of the box. They also need to be "broken in" in many cases. New wheels can go out of true just from being ridden for the first time, one of my favourite things after building a new bike was to ride it around the shop and listen to all the spoke nipples make their "pinging" noises as they ...


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The issue you are having is the wheel is "out of true". This is caused by uneven spoke tension. It can be adjusted, but it's easy to go wrong here and make it worse if you don't know what you're doing. Most good bikes are bought from bike shops. This allows the shop to properly assemble and adjust the bike. If you know someone who can do it (and ...


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Something is wrong with the casing. Not safe to ride. Sometimes the come from the factory that way, who knows why. Send it back and get it exchanged. Don't risk a catastrophic blowout.


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Generally mud you want a skinny tire with very good clearing capability and depending on the mix of rocks and roots the hight of the knobs should be short. In situations where there is little rocks and roots, tall spikes work best. I have raced downhill for several years on the east coast of the US which is notorious for being muddy races. We ran mud ...


14

Depends on how viscous and deep the mud is. If the mud is viscous like clay and maybe leaves mixed and a fat tire can float and still get traction then the bigger tire is better. But with normal mud and less than 6 inches deep then a thinner tire that will sink to the bottom for traction and might do better. I was in a cyclocross race recently where we ...


4

Fatbikes are traditionally used for sand and snow, but what about mud? Yes. Would a wide tyre with a mud-specific tread work better or worse than a narrow one in mud? Better. A larger footprint with lower pressure has better traction on surfaces with low shear strength. I have an On-One Fatty which is a joy to ride on technical ascents (despite the ...


2

In addition to the alignment of the wheels, one needs to consider the alignment of the tongue. The pivot point where the tongue attaches to the bike should be exactly along the centerline of the trailer (even if the tongue is not attached to the center of the trailer), not off to one side. If the tongue (at the pivot point) is not centered then you are ...


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I have rented a medium frame hard tail 29er silverback with deore drive train and was not surprised. You guys were right, tight corners were really hard to handle at first, gut some bruises to realize it as well. But later on it became much easier. I was clumsy at first (it was a huge transition from 26"), and I could feel an added weight compared to 26ers. ...


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That is not scrub a bit - that is scrub a lot. I don't agree a softer tire will not scrub. Yes a softer tire will give bit but then it has no option but to scrub. With no load I suspect the wheels are not aligned perfectly and then those short short axles play. A little play on that short radius is a lot of alignment. I get you like the portability of ...



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