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3

I think you would find the bike handles reasonably on single track, 4x4 tracks and dirt paths but there are a few things to bear in mind. I'd ride single track but stick to trails graded easy. Where an MTB would be mandatory would be anything above that. The following features would require a MTB (or at least no gear or being on a short ride ie. mud). ...


1

The Novara Safari is a bike designed for off road touring. Novara Safari Bike With a load you are not going to be doing real technical stuff. But you should be a be able to handle "improved trails". The biggest tires it will take is the best thing you can do - and practice. The link says it has Alex ATD 470 rims. Those are not high end rims and more of a ...


1

Search for "schrader chuck" or "schrader head", and take your pick. If you want one locally. any auto parts store should have a couple to choose from. Alternatively, if you need a presta head, just switch the search terms. Silca makes a couple of popular ones.


3

It's just a standard schrader head. Locking heads are only needed for hand- or foot-pumps as you can't secure the head on while pumping the pump manually. Any well-stocked automobile parts store will have a schrader head for an air-compressor that doesn't require a locking head. Schrader valves are the same valves used on your automobile tire. For ...


-1

I have done it .. It seems to work. The bike shop warned me that putting a 1-3/8 tire on a 1-1/4 rim could cause the the bicycle to topple ..


1

Be careful with overinflation, as while rolling resistance drops with increasing pressure, there comes a point when further increasing tyre pressure begins to dramatically increase rolling resistance. Often this is around the point of the tyre's maximum rated pressure, although it can be less than that depending on a few factors. Here is an article that ...


2

I like fixed as the front end is lighter and it does not move around. Carbon if you are willing to spend the money. Single speed means no derailleur to break. And smaller chain ring and bash guard gives you more clearance. I don't think you want a real wide tire. I would think like a 2.1 - preferably tubeless. If you start riding 2" pipe you may even ...


5

From my experience, no they would not. Have you ever watched anyone ride a fatbike? Their front tire wobbles all over the place, the extra weight from the heavy tires makes fine-adjustments much more difficult, putting extra fatigue on your body. That being said, training with a bike that's not suited for skinnys will make riding them easier when you hop on ...


1

Like all good answers: yes and no. Having ridden several "fatties," I can say that the wider contact patch and added grip certainly makes for a more confident feeling, but the lower air pressure and subsequent squishy-ness can sometimes make steering a touch...different. There's also the question of how skinny are the skinnies you want to ride? A fat tire ...


1

I live fairly close to you (just north of the boarder ), and I own studded Schwalbe winter marathons (700x40c). I only use them maybe one to two weeks out of the year. While a bit of a luxury they are incredibly useful under the appropriate conditions (e.g., compacted snow and ice). Where I found they worked well Here I disagree with Batman about not ...


5

Studded tires don't help on snow any more than knobbies do - they're for ice. The canonical website on winter biking is probably IceBike. It really depends on how far you want to go - a wide MTB tire at low pressure is nice in the snow. The aggressive studded tires are designed for riding in snow, not mostly cleared roads with possible bits of ice. If ...


1

14" tires are actually quite common on department store bikes (Wal Mart, etc), but they are not found on "bike shop" brands. I think this is where some of the confusion on this issue has come in. You will almost certainly be fine with the slightly wider tire. For one thing, there is no true standardization on tire widths. I.e., every company uses its own ...


2

A few words of caution. As others have noted, 14" tires aren't terribly common, but they do exist. In fact, Schwalbe lists two different ISO sized 14" tires (288 and 298). Make you you get the proper ISO sized 14" tires. http://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_tires/tubes


3

First, I want to "second the motion" by Daniel R Hicks to read Sheldon Brown's excellent page on tire sizes: http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html 14-inch tires are not particularly common. In fact, Sheldon Brown's charts include 16" and 12-1/2" tires, but they don't mention 14" tires. However, an eBay search finds some... ...


3

It all depends on if the bike frame has room. That is less than a 10% difference. If you can get the tip of your little finger between the tire and the frame with the 1.95 then most likely it will take a 2.125.


8

MTB rims branded 26" measure 559mm to the bead seat, which converts to... 22 inches. You already have 26" wheels. They're called 26" because when you put an ordinary 2" wide tyre on them, the outside diameter is about 26".


3

I doubt it has 22" tires/rims - more likely the rims are 26" or 29" (in which case it should be listed as a Rockhopper 29) and the tires are 2.2" (and the seller forgot the decimal point). 22 inch wheels on bicycles are pretty much a botique item for BMX, and certainly wouldn't be found on an adult sized bicycle (and the kids bikes from Specialized are ...


0

All things are not equal. In particular, the load on the rear tire of a road bike is about 60% and on the front it is about 40%. Nor do all riders+bikes weigh the same amount. A 250 lb ultra-Clydesdale might not even want to ride on 21mm tire, let alone ride on it and inflate it up to the sidewall maximum. If you do overinflate, you will get a rock hard ...



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