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-1

I think it is better to be safe than sorry...it only takes a few minutes so why not patch it.


0

Unlike on a car tire, the sidewall isn't more important than the rest of the tire, really [ on a car tire, if the sidewall goes, you're going to blow out]. This link from Sheldon is good reading: "If you are mainly concerned with safety/function, there are only two reasons for replacing old tires: 1) When the tread is worn so thin that you start getting a ...


0

People patch tubless mountain bike tires all the time. You could use a slime tire patch kit, used frequently for Motorcycle, ATV, and Dirt Bike tires as those patches are a bit more durable than standard bike tube patches. It seems like all the amazon review are from mountain bikers. I've used a regular bike tube patch on the inside of the tire as well. ...


3

I folded a dollar-bill and placed it between the tube and tire on my last set of tires. That lasted about four months before the tube finally pushed it's way out the tear and popped. Safest bet is to replace the tire. But in a pinch, the dollar-bill trick will at least get you home/to the bike shop.


1

It depends. If the threads on the inside of the tyre are not damaged, only check for any left-over glass debris in the gash and leave as-is. Otherwise, either ditch the tyre or boot it from the inside, like @Batman suggested already.


6

I think thats small enough that I probably wouldn't worry about it too much, but you can fill it in with a dab of super glue or sealants for rubber (like shoe goo) for peace of mind. You could boot it (a nice boot is the Park Tool TB-2), but I think this is likely too much work.


3

There are tires made out of thin layers of relatively soft rubber, and ones (usually for puncture resistance) made out of thick layers of relatively stiff (almost like plastic) rubber. At a given tire pressure, the soft tire will be "bouncier" because the softer rubber has less of a viscoelastic damping effect than the harder rubber. As a result, the ...


0

It looks to me from the condition of the tread like you'll be replacing the tire pretty soon in any event. It might be possible to limp along like this a while longer, using a liner or such (I've used a dollar bill in a pinch for that), but what can happen is eventually the tube will poke through the tire and when that happens it wears quickly or pinches ...


0

I've had that happen with schrader valves when I don't get the fitting on the valve stem all the way. There's a little pin that has to be pressed down in order for air to get into the tire, and if it isn't pressed down enough, it won't allow any air in no matter how much you pump. Make sure you press hard enough to fully seat the pump fitting onto the ...


0

As @Batman mentions, it's more about the construction than the rubber compound, but I suppose thick MTB tyres will cushion bumps better if they are made from softer rubber. Lightweight racing tyres tend to be thinner, especially in the sidewalls - there they are made as thin as possible because puncture resistance is not a priority. Such tyres are typically ...


3

Most definitely. I have some Schwalbe Marathon Plus HS 440 - very puncture resistant tire. It is hard rubber and has a puncture insert. It is a hard tire and gives a hard ride anywhere in the pressure range. I have a softer same size less less ballistic tire on another bike and at the same pressure it is a softer ride a nicer grip. And it is not the ...


1

I don't think your premise is right - an overinflated tire should be bouncier and faster than an underinflated tire which should provide better shock absorption at the risk of more tire damage. A properly inflated tire should balance this out. A softer rubber compound should mostly be for increasing grip (and many tires are made of several rubber hardnesses ...


1

You'd have to test it out - theres enough variation in tires (esp. studded tires) for two tires to be marked the same size and one fit and one not fit. This thread indicates that for an older Bad Boy with rigid fork was able to clear a 47 mm tire (which looks to be the largest possible), so I'd guess the answer is yes, but YMMV.


0

Air is not going in valve. If Presta valve, the nut on top must be loosened. Then tap the end with your finger. You'll hear a little air escape. Connect the pump chuck and inflate. If a Scrader valve (like a car tire valve), the chuck probably is not pressed on far enough.


0

Pressure is the ratio of force to the area over which that force is distributed, so if you want to use less force, solution may be a double-handle pump with a thinner cylinder. Pump with a large diameter cylinder can pump air faster but needs more force. Pump with a smaller diameter cylinder will deliver less air with a single stroke, but requires less ...


10

It sounds like your pump is not on the valve properly, so instead of inflating the tire you're just pressurizing the inside of your pump. Does your bike have Schrader valves (the kind you see on a car) or Presta valves (skinnier, with a kind of pointy top)? If it has Presta valves, make sure the top of the valve is unscrewed. There's a little nut that you ...


2

Pull the tire. Don't just clear it of substantial debris - clear it of all debris. If there is something in there it will work though the cords. If you are into the cord then still do not give up as that is a decent tire. From the inside if you can see damage to the cord then time to get a new tire. While you have it off pull the front and rotate. ...


1

You don't need to be too worried about it. From my own preference in the past, if the tire plies are not exposed, tires with mere surface damages can still last a very long time. Rubber is sturdier than what most people think. I ride a CX on MTB trails and get tires scuffed all the time. Especially if you are not doing anything intense (I assume because ...


5

It does not look to me like the cords are damaged, which means the tire will still have its strength to hold the air pressure of the tube. You have three easy options. Personally I would take the last: Ignore it. It will probably last until the tire has no tread left. The cut itself will bulge a little, so this will be the point of failure of the tire. ...


2

Zero maintenance is just not going to happen. A bicycle has a many moving parts. Chains, gears, and bearings. Go for a puncture resistant tire. An example is the Schwalbe Marathon Plus.


9

As the comments have comprehensively pointed out, solid tyres have some significant problems. I recently fitted a solid tyre from Tannus on my bike with the same goals as yours. I only managed to last a few weeks before I couldn't deal with the problems and refitted my standard tyres. Pros No flat tyres! Cons Rough ride - the ride quality was awful. ...


0

One trick I have used in a pinch when my stem was too short for the rim depth (as your picture is showing) is to place my thumb against the tire at the point of the stem and carefully press in until the stem is being held out of the rim. This can give the leverage needed to attach the pump head to the short stem length. While the stem extender solution is a ...


1

I have now had a road bike for 3 days since i transferred from mountain biker to road biker. I've done just over 50 miles and my experiences so far would be both bikes have pros and cons. The mountain bike is a LOT slower. The width of the tyres being thicker means more surface contact with the road and it slows you down and requires way more effort to ride ...


5

Cheapest, safest and most practical option option would be to sell and buy a second hand bike. For instance I just sold and old, but perfectly usable full suspension MTB that originally cost about $US3500 in 1995 for $US60.00. The buyer got a bargain and I got some space back in my garage. Look for someone who wants some garage space back.... If however ...


1

Not really an answer, but I put it here to separate it from the comments about using a decent track pump... Daniel R Hicks makes a good point about the cracks - they seem to be between the tread and sidewall. This suggests to me that there are two different rubber compounds that aren't "mating" well. According to a few mechanics I know, Schwalbe have had ...


0

Really doubt it. 27 is 630 iso and 700 is 622 iso. SheldonBrownTireSizing


1

Three possibilities that I see You did not suddenly lose air you just did not notice until you got to the cobble stone The rubber tube failed and recovered The valve failed and recovered No so sure you had a sudden loss of air. If the tire when from 90 psi to 20 psi in a short period of most likely you would have heard that. Since the valved is the ...


0

I think a treaded tire would cut through mud on asphalt better than slicks. A total slick with no biting edges on so is less likely to grip on the surface because it is smooth having less friction. Tread gives somewhere for mud to go, kind of like in safety shoes where the water is squeezed out between the grooves. Likewise the mud is pushed between the ...


1

An alternative way to calculate the solution: The pressure in the tyre is 100psi. Pressure equals force divided by area. The surface area inside the inner tube (for a 700x23c tyre) is (very) roughly 7.2cm x 210cm = 1512cm square [or in square inches = 234insq]. The total forces involved on an unladen wheel are therefore 100 ‘pounds per square inch’ x 234 ...


0

Interesting question, and I enjoyed the technical answers given, but... I am continuously amazed at the overemphasis placed on the weight of bikes. Yes it is important, but relative to other factors it is not that significant. Lets compare a 20# bike to a 24# bike. If your budget is $1000 for a new bike, would you choose a 20# bike with very good components ...


7

If you are riding on the road, you don't need treads. Even with mud. Even with sand, or gravel. Unless you are riding on the street in the middle of a volcanic mudslide or torrential rain washing out the road, it won't matter. The curved cross section of your tires coupled with your mass will instantly cut right through any patches of water or mud as you ...


3

But there is not one traction If you have surface that does not slip like asphalt or cement then you want maximum contact. A slick. That is why Nascar does it. If you have a surface that does slip like gravel or dirt then you want a tire that grabs. Tread or knobs. Mud is whole different beast. Water has basically no traction. Hydroplane is a ...


1

If you're commuting on roads, there are plenty of good tires with kevlar belts for puncture protection (e.g. Schwalbe Marathon line). Slicks are ideal for roads since you don't need tread - this is a good page to read about the topic. You don't say how you got the flats though, so it is possible you had a bad valve or inadequate rim tape or underinflation, ...


0

No one has really addressed the size versus pressure part of the question. Nominally different sized tires will have about the same mass of air. As the size of the tire goes up the design pressure goes down. The contact patch must support the weight of the rider. Assume bike with rider is 100 lbs on the rear wheel. At 100 psi the size of the contact ...


7

Your sliding out at 5mph wasn't because the tires were slicks, it was for some other reason. They were either lousy tires, improperly installed, rider error, or some other factor. If you are riding on the road, there is no need for any kind of tread. Slicks are perfectly fine, despite your thoughts from your previous experience. In fact, they are ideal, and ...


1

I have done quite a bit of touring on my Surly Long Haul Trucker which includes 1,000 + kilometres of dirt riding 1. On my Surly for such tours I fitted Schwalbe Marathon Mondial HS 428 47-622 tyres and prior to that for an early tour again with a fair bit of dirt roads I fitted Schwalbe Marathon Cross HS 334 700Cx38. Both tyres have proven to be more than ...


2

You have 26" tyres currently, there are certainly "slicker" options available to you. I think its quite easy to obtain tyres which go down to about 1.25" wide. This is not the crazy narrow 23mm (or less) that you might typically see on a road bike (and really, these bikes can only be ridden on the road), but on tarmac/asphalt you'll certainly notice a ...


8

Gravel tires are normally a little knobby: versus completely smooth for a road tire. One strategy is to run a gravel or combination tire in the front and a road tire in the back. A combination tire is one which is nearly slick in the middle with knobs on the sides, so you might want to try one road tire on the back and one gravel tire on the front. ...


3

Look for city or touring tires. Road in bicycle means more of a racing tire. A tire like this go pavement and packed nicely Travel CONTACT. Almost all manufacturers will have tires like this. A road type tread in the middle but a little grip on the edges for if you do sink a little. Great answer from Batman (+1) but I don't think the Gravel Plus is ...


8

One of the reviews has something interesting to say These 27" and 26" tires are made to fit older 10 speed/english racer type bikes. You should remember that the 26"x1-3/8" size predates the MTB era by at least three decades, they came first. If you have an old Raleigh three speed or a 1970s Peugeot then these are the tires you need in the ...


7

It sounds as though your problem was a somewhat loose tyre not properly seated. It may have been loose enough that it couldn't be properly seated, but in that case I'd expect it to pop off and the tube explode while you were pumping it up for the first time. You may also be running the tyres at too low a pressure, with a skinny tyre like that I'd expect them ...


3

Those tires should work just fine. Any of the MTB slick tires listed on that site would work well with your bike and current rims. You can get too small a tire on too wide a rim, but it takes a much bigger jump than from 2" to 1.5 or so. There is a very conservative guide on Sheldon Brown's bike pages. http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html Given your ...


0

There is not an issue going down in size. I see nothing wrong with the tires you have selected. At 300 lbs maybe step up to a 1.75. Just going to a street type tire from the knobby is going to reduce rolling resistance and give you a nicer street ride. When you go down in size that far you should also get new tubes. Once the tubes have been stretched ...


0

Cons: Heavier, more rolling resistance, some are prone to cracking on the sidewalls, tougher to remove. Pros: Lasts for ages, great if you live in a city with a lot of serious potholes, good for rolling over different terrain, rarely have to change a tire.


0

The obvious advantage is puncture resistance There are several disadvantages: weight rolling resistance grip ride cost There are several levels of puncture resistance and a Kevlar belt is not the only means. Let me tell you a story. After two years on a tire with moderate puncture resistance got my first flat and had to walk it home. I got on-line ...


0

a. Clincher and Tubular refer to the type of rim on the wheel, and what type of tire can be used on the wheel. b. Clincher wheels are the most common type and are used with a tire and an inner tube. If you get a flat tire with a clincher, you can change out the inner tube and continue riding fairly quickly. c. Tubular wheels are lighter and cheaper, ...


0

I commute with SS and 25c in front and 23c on the back. I live in Zagreb so there is really a lot of variations of terrain, but I like to be fast so I don't mind. I had more problems with wider tiers than with thinner tiers. So, IMHO thin tiers are just fine and I enjoy them, but I also think that you yourself need to try different setup and see what suits ...


6

I commute on two bicycles: — a road bike, with 25mm tire up front and a 28mm back. — a custom commuter bike, with 32mm up front, 35mm back. I'd recommend you go with the 32mm tires. The 28mm tires I've used are good for commuting (I think the 25mm I have is too small — I have to give it too much attention when crossing curb lines and such). That said, ...


2

Based on the title alone 32mm tires are not ideal for fast commuter bike. But that picture is some harsh conditions and you state safety is important. For that picture and the pictures you had on the fork question I would go 32mm or even 35mm. A 35mm is not not going to be as fast but it should be softer and have more grip. And also which type of tire. ...


3

Have had a Trek FX 7.2 for 6 years. Came with 35's. Replaced with 32's. Work very well for pavement. If you are doing any curb jumping or cobblestone, I would not suggest the 28's. If you are looking at a Trek hybrid (love mine), consider a carbon fork model. Mine is all metal and I feel the vibrations in my forearms. That is the ONLY bad thing I have to ...



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