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2

First thing I would suspect is that you somehow installed the tube incorrectly, maybe twisted. Next, you may have installed the tube before the glue dried and failed to dust the patch with talc, causing it to stick to the inside of the tire. Or the tube may have been too small from the start, and the patches are keeping it from stretching enough to fill ...


4

If you inflated the tire and the tire itself is indented at times, it is likely that you did not seat the tire correctly. This means the tire bead is not sitting correctly in the rim. The rim should have hooks to catch the tire bead. The tube should expand to many times its original size and will fill the volume made available to it. As such, a tire that ...


0

The "sharpening a knife" sound you describe is likely the rotor lightly touching the brake pad (as mentioned in @Jackson's answer). This can happen if the rotor slightly is out-of-true (i.e., slightly warped) and the caliper isn't perfectly aligned. The sound can also come and go depending on how warm the rotor is. As you add heat the rotor (e.g., from ...


0

With disk brakes the disk rotor is attached to the hub and not to the rim so a wobble in the tyre is unlikely to be the cause of the noise. What I'd be looking at is the following: Are the rotor bolts tight? Is the rotor warped? Are the brake pads worn? Is one or both of the pistons sticking? Is the calipar aligned properly? 1 and 2 you can check ...


0

when there is a problem with noise and visual inspection, it's best if you could make a video and post it to, say, youtube. But if the wheel is wobbling, you need to true it (if the rim is wobbling, too). Also check if the wheel wobble when at rest, simply by using hand to push and pull the wheel side-way. If the wheel also wobbles, the cone might need to ...


2

The Dahon Vitesse D8 site says it ships with KOMMUTER, 20" x 1.75" tires. Any tires of those dimensions will do the job. The applications you mention suggest that a tire with a small amount of tread would be better than a slick (no tread) tire. The mind boggling array of tires you see is because the suppliers are all trying to distinguish their ...


1

Are you running the wheels as tubeless? If you are you'll want to be sure that the rims and tires are rated for sufficient pressure. Last time I was looking at tubeless (early-2015) I wasn't having much luck finding road rims and tires. I think that the issue was the pressures that need to be run to support the narrower tires. But if you're running tubes, ...


6

You can (theoretically) mount any 700x(something) tire on any 700c (ISO 622) rim. However, you need to make sure the frame (and brakes if rim brakes are used) can clear the tire without rubbing. You generally want to match the rim width to the tire though -- too narrow or too wide of a tire on a rim can lead to tire/rim damage or bad handling. In your ...


1

I've glued hundreds of tubulars and learned the craft from some of the best mechanics in the sport including a former wrench with the Motorola team and a former Mavic Service Course mechanic. These days tubulars are really only used in cyclocross, track and at the very top level of the sport. There are some very distinct downsides: Safety. Improperly ...


5

Yes, those are wear indicators. The change is noted by retailers: Note: Continental has added wear indicators to all Continental Gatorskin tires. These small divots in the tread surface are intentional and are not a sign of a factory defect. Once the rubber wears to the point where the divots are no longer discernible, you'll know it's time to ...


0

Highly likely to be a wear indicator. The Conti Grand Prix 4000s have them as well.


1

I terms of the "am I too heavy for my tires?" question, you can look for the specs on the tire maker's site. Schwalbe publishes a rated load for their tires, I'd expect that other reputable makers do as well. As a point of reference their Marathon Plus tire is rated for a load of up to 90 kg / 198 pounds in a 32-622 size (probably at 6.55 bar / 95 psi). ...


0

I had a similar situation this afternoon. Air temps 95+f. Tire pressure 105. I noticed a click sound. I thought maybe my magnet was touching bike computer pickup. Another rider happened to notice the bubble. I began my return toward home just clicking along. After about 2 miles the sound was gone. I looked and could see where it had been. Apparently ...


1

How much clearance do you have on the front wheel? Doesn’t look like you can fit much more than 25mm width there. With your weight and luggage I’d go as wide as possible. Maybe 25mm in the front and 28mm in the back (if the brake has enough clearance). Of course it also depends on the quality of the roads.


1

It is possible. For typical mountain rims, the low limit is somewhere around 28mm. Some differences from mounting narrower tires are following: Less cushioning from tires: Smaller tires can not absorb as much shock from from curbs, cracks in the pavement, etc. On the other hand, smaller tires can be made with more flexible casing and absorb small ...


3

What you want for road use is slick tires -- tread and knobs are bad for road use. You have 26" (ISO 559) rims, so you need 26 x (something) tires where (something) is a number in decimal form (e.g. 1.75). Going for smaller tires will lower the bike a bit, and smaller tires have to be run at higher pressure (so you'll get less cushioning). There will also ...


0

They are indeed the same size of tire. For some reason, the "c" gets shuffled about, sometimes being put after the 700, sometimes being put after the tire width (in this case, 23mm), etc. Peruse Sheldon Brown's Tire Cribsheet, and if you want lots of fun facts about tire sizing (including the difference between French standards and ISO standards), read ...


2

700x23 and 700x23C and 700C x 23 and 700x23c and 700x23c all mean the same size of tire.


0

The largest tire you can run on a bike is determined by several things: Frame (If it rubs on the frame when you're riding it, you're going to ruin the paint on your bike and the tire) Brakes (If your brakes can't clear the tire, you have a problem) Rim Width (If the rim is too narrow or wide for a tire, you can have increased chances of rim/tire damage or ...


0

No, it is by no means universal. Frames are built with a maximum tire size in mind. Some bike include a maximum size in their specs, so you might check to see. Otherwise, it is easy enough to figure out. Since you have tires on the bike already, you can check the existing clearance and get a very good idea of what will fit. Start by measuring the ...


0

It will depend on the rim width, according to Schwalbe's table of tire size to rim widths you'd be fine with a 17 or 19 mm rim and you'd be pushing it if you have a 21 mm rim.


0

The bike would sit about 4 mm lower is the main thing (and technically, the gearing will change slightly). You can mount the tire on there and it will work, but it may not be optimal depending on your rim width; if the rim is too wide for the tire, you may get more flats or rim damage when you hit a road hazard. As for why you want to switch to something ...


0

Understand that traditional bicycle wheel sizes have generally referred to the diameter of the tire, not the rim. Thus a 26" wheel will have a diameter of roughly 26 inches with the tire on it and inflated (though the actual diameter is often not reliable enough to size the wheel). And, in particular, 26" wheels (and smaller) have different rim diameters ...


0

Both of those tires are quite close to the tires that you already have. There is a really good chance that they will fit. Because of the extra material in the SmartGuard layer these tires are taller than they are wide, but only by a couple of millimeters. So all you need to be concerned about is to look at the clearance on your bike with your current tires. ...


1

Generally, if fairly new tires start to crack, they were poor quality tires to begin with. That's a red flag on its own. Don't use them. Bicycles only have two tires between you and the ground, that means if your only front tire fails at speed the chances are good that you're going to end up on the ground. Without a definitive image of the damage, damaged ...


3

The cracks will expose the internal structure to elements. So yes, they are not going to last as long as non-cracked ones but very probably not going to explode right away either. The Nokia tires that used to be popular in my country developed cracks between tread and sidewall after a few months' use and could still be ridden for years afterwards. Your ...


0

Well, I went ahead and ordered some Shimano 105 dual pivot calipers. Unfortunately the rear caliper arms will not clear the seat stays. There's just no fixing it as far as I can tell. If I put on additional washers, the fixing nut will not thread onto the main mounting bolt far enough. I tried several sizes of fixing nuts and none of them will work. I hope ...



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