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Three posibilities: The tire is defective (least likely). The tire is simply not settling onto the rim properly. You managed to twist/pinch the tube while installing. If you twisted/pinched the tube then there will be low spots, where the tire does not seem to inflate fully. If you suspect this, of course, remove and reinstall the tube. If you're ...


0

This will probably sound crazy, but I sewed up a tear in the sidewall with fishing line once. Lasted six months at least, running at full pressure on my daily commute (7 miles round trip). If I had made my seam about 1/4 inch longer than the tear on each end of the tear, it would've lasted even longer. Just be sure you're threading into the unfrayed ...


1

The dollar bill trick is good for getting home, but eventually the linen fibers will wear out. You can make your own tire boots by scrounging a tubular tire. Cut out a 7cm by 3cm rounded rectangle, and peal off the tread if you can. I found one in the trash at a local bike store three decades ago and I've only used a small portion of it. To glue it in ...


1

I always carry a spare inner tube AND a cheap small tire patch kit, plus 2 CO2 cartridges with me when I ride. That way, in theory, I can fix up to two flats on a ride. The tire patch kits go bad over time, so I replace them regularly. In practice, I have used the time patch kit to repair tire cuts much more often than I use it to fix a second flat. The ...


3

You may be surprised how long your paper patch lasts. I've used dollar bills, empty energy gel packs and they have lasted quite a long time, but now carry Park Tool Tire Boots. They have an adhesive and attach to the inside of your tire and stay put, even if you get another flat and have to change tubes. I've found that the money or paper solution will move ...


4

Well, the main advantages of tubeless is that you can run lower pressures (which comes with better shock absorption and thus control) with less risk of flats (though you should always carry a backup tube). I'm not entirely sure on where the truth is in regards to weight, but I don't think its important. The disadvantages are still having to carry a backup ...


3

Well, I hoped someone with more recent experience would chime in. It's been 20 years since I used tubulars, but here's what I remember. While the glue is important, the inflation of the tire will hold the tire to the rim. The glue is largely there to prevent the tire rolling when you're cornering hard and to keep the tire on the rim if you get a flat/slow ...


1

See for a definitive (imho conservative) answer the almighty Sheldon Brown(bottom of page). The rim width can vary a little between wheels. Having said that, I have been running 700-35c Cyclocross knobby tires on standard Shimano Ultegra road racing wheels for years without any issue. Another really good tire for commuting and light offroading (gravel) to ...


1

Looks like the rim is a 559... From Sheldon Brown / Harris Cyclery: If your tire size is expressed as "26 x 1.25" or "26 x 1.50" or "26 x 1.75" or "26 x 1.95" or "26 x 2.1" or "26 x 2.125" or "26 x " any other decimal number, 559 mm is the size you need. Pretty much any 559 mm tire will work on any 559 mm rim, but it is best to avoid using very ...


0

I don't know if the clothing was cotton, cotton blend or what have you, but this has worked for me in the past: Using your fingernails or a dull knife or scraper, pick off as much of the excess cement from the fabric as you can. You can try gently pulling, scraping or rolling fragments as best you can I've used a little petroleum jelly rubbed on the cement ...


2

Most road frames aren't going to take tires beyond 28mm. There are exceptions. Cyclocross bikes will take wider tires. A 'cross bike makes a good commuter if it has mount points for fenders and a rack. Although tire width is a personal preference, the wider road tires are usually better for commuting on city streets. I run 35mm tires on my city bike. ...


1

Basically, you can run any width of tire that can safely clear the brakes and frame and which is not "too wide" for the rim. When considering brake/frame clearance you need to understand that a "wider" tire will not only be wider but "taller", so make sure that the outer circumference of the tire will not rub against the frame or the brake pivot (in the ...


1

Bigger tires means that you can run them at lower pressures while avoiding road hazard damage and increasing cushioning to give a better ride. They may be a bit less responsive or feel slower than some thinner tires, but this will not matter on a commute. Bigger tires also do better with heavier riders (23's require pretty high pressure for "heavy" riders to ...


2

Oh yeah, definitely put some 28s on there. They'll give you better traction, better handling ( especially on most commutes ), and more comfort. Go for a nice, durable city tire. Whatever you do, don't try to save money on tires, spend a few extra dollars on high quality tires and you'll never look back. Nice tires will last longer, perform better, and save ...


2

Three things to check: 1, Is the bead seated correctly. It's pretty common to get tyres blowing off the rim if they're not seated correctly. That said, this usually leads to an exploding tube rather than the tyre just coming off 2, As Daniel R Hicks said, are the rims so worn they're expanding? 3, Check the rim for dings and warping as Malarky sort of says, ...



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