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-1

put carnations condensed concentrated milk into your tube take out valve stem get a applicator bottle u need a hose that will either snug over stem or inner to fill up tube use half a can to a can per tube 3 fl oz should due. this id recommend if u are a green slime believer depending on thickness and type tires entry level regular tires no high end racing ...


5

As an owner of both 650c and 700c-wheeled bikes will happily share my thoughts. First of all, 650c wheels are lighter and obviously smaller which makes the whole ride more dynamic which can improve your maneuverability. On the other hand, 650c wheels are prone to sliding on stones or corners so you must be more careful when riding. 650c wheels spin faster ...


0

Ahh, no. The rims are different sizes, 700 vs 650, so obviously each will take a different size tire. Why do you want to change to a smaller wheel? Brakes likely will not reach rim. Bicycle would be closer to ground.


11

No you will not be able to use your 700x23c tire on a 650c rim. The bead seat diameter of 700c rims is 622mm, this will also be the bead diameter of the your 700x23c tire. The bead seat diameter of a 650c rim is 571mm (see Velocity's Spec section). Your 700x23c tire will be 51mm too wide.


0

For the question in the comment: You will have to move the brake pad a bit further down to adapt to the smaller rim. This may possibly lead to that you have to change the brake. Check how much you can lower the brake pad.


0

Best place to look is Sheldon Brown's famous site. http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html I would suggest given the difference in diamaeter you will run into issues attempting to put your 700x23c tyres on a 650c rim.


0

Walmart was selling foam inserts that would replace the tube. This would eliminate any chance of a puncture. The disadvantage was weight. The one I handled was about 50% heavier then a convenrtional tire and tube.


1

A more puncture resistant tyre isn't going to necessarily help in this situation. If you've come out of work and you've got a flat, it seems like a slow leak. If you didn't find anything in the tyre the 2nd time, I would be checking how you've seated the tyre on the rim, have you accidentally pinched the tube a bit, are the valves in good working order, are ...


5

There are a few things to do. I'd start by reading this link from Sheldon Brown. First determine how the flats are occurring. Inspect the tube. Is the rim tape on the rim properly? (if not, you'll see a puncture on the wheel side) Is the tube being pinch flatted? (a snakebite flat, two very closely placed punctures - usually a sign of too low pressure) ...


1

You can mix and match tire sizes if you want - its relatively common. You just need to make sure that the tires fit on the rim and to a lesser extent are not too thin or too wide for the rim. This is often done for different tire clearances in the front and back, for example.


1

1) Check and double check for objects in the tire again. Little shards may be completely embedded into the tire. I once had to go through 3 flats, searching every time, before finally finding the little bastard. Bending the tire inwards might help. 2) The Smart Sam exists in a "Plus" version with a 3 mm puncture guard. So if you like the Smart Sam, check ...


0

You can essentially inflate the tube out as much as you want until it pops. If you over inflate it before mounting it, it wont fit. Try using less air. Generally, also, tubes are marked for a certain size of tires, so try to match that too (if the tube is too big of a size, you may have it fold over itself, while if its too small the tube may be effectively ...


1

As stated in this answer or this link, the idea was originally that there were 700A,700B,700C tires+wheels which all had an outer diameter of 700 mm with A tires being the thinnest and C tires being the thickest (so A had the largest rim and C had the smallest rim). Eventually, the C variant won out, and people varied the outer diameter by mounting different ...


0

Two answers suggest tubeless but I am not aware of any tubeless fat rims or tubeless conversion kits. This is a good video on a DIY fat tubeless conversion Tubeless Fatbike Conversion Update And lots of sealant as you have a lot of rubber to cover Or Slimed tubes as I suggested in a comment. Unless you are riding sand and need the flotation I would ...


0

A large carcass under low pressure is flexible. Due to the unusually large contact patch, the pressure your weight applies to the ground is low Low contact pressure + flexible carcass => reduced risk of penetration. I don't know of any fatbikers running liners, but many do do tubeless to reduce rotating weight and lose the rolling resistance created by ...


0

Though not supported by specialized, your best option is to probably setup your wheels tubeless with tire sealant. Keep an extra bottle of sealant with you just in case you have trouble on the trail and need a refresh, but keep a tube handy if that fails as well. Some folks have had good luck by injecting some tube sealant (like slime) inside their inner ...


1

I also would recommend finding tubes with valves of the correct length. However, if that fails, I've had success using a presta to schrader adapter. Often with shorter valves, there won't be enough room to attach a pump head, but there will be enough to attach an adapter, which you can then use a pump that works with schrader valves. Most pumps have the ...


0

I run Conti Race28 tubes (but with clinchers) on my deep rims. These tubes have removable cores so I have no problems fitting an extender. Obviously this doesn't solve your current problem, but I'm sure there must be compatible tubs out there that will work for you.


0

To be honest, the simplest thing is going to be getting tubes with the correct valve length for your rims. If your LBS won't do the exchange put it down to a lesson in what length valves you need for your flash 50mm rims.


3

There are multiple types of valve extension: The extenders you have relocate the valve core. The other kind are a plain tube which tapers with a similar profile to a normal valve, and screws onto the valve, over the existing valve core. Once the tyre is inflated you can remove the extension and tighten the valve-lock-nut.


-2

By the term bursting "Inner tube bursting" is not caused by the tire but is caused by over inflating. Please get a good quality rubber tube(rubber doesn't change its color when tube is inflated ) Yeah and also a combination of a good tube and tires significantly reduces the risk of flats(especially on a road bike) -I have got a set of tire liners and an ...


0

The rule for the right pressure for a 700x23 size is 80-100 psi for a person weighing 60-75 KGS and 100 -130 psi for a person weighing above 75. Please check your max tire pressure on the tire and fix up with a tire pressure as mentioned above. P.S: Also make sure the tube is in the right position between the rims.. Else you might end up with a snake bite ...


1

The rims spec'd with a lot of new Trek bikes (including yours) are "Tubeless ready". This means that you can run tubeless, but you can also run regular old tires with tubes (i.e. clinchers). The primary advantage of running a tubeless tire (which will be marked as tubeless) is that you can run a lower pressure without getting pinch flats, which is ...


0

Many tyres can be made to work without a tube, but tubeless tyres tend to work fine with tubes. The bead of a tubeless tyre is smooth and moulded more accurately than non-tubeless tyres, to form a tighter seal with tubeless-compatible rims. You may be able to achieve tubeless running with a non-tubeless tyre, but it's likely you will need to use more ...


3

As I've said in other answers, the right tire pressure function of you and your bike and your terrain. You'll have to play with the tire pressure to balance the ride quality.Just because the tire says pressure x on the sidewall doesn't mean it makes any sense running the tire at that pressure since it might just give a bouncy ride which compromises your ...


0

Look at the range on the tire. There are different rules of thumb but if you weight 115 you would be at or close to the smaller number.


2

Yes, better tires can help prevent punctures. It has already been mentioned that there are tires specifically made to enhance puncture resistance. One thing that has not been mentioned is that better tires also have stronger sidewalls to offer more tire support when going over bumps and thus better protect against pinch flats. (Once, I had a cheap tire with ...


2

Yeap- no reason not to. I do the same on my mountain bike, I prefer the width of the wider rear to enable stability/grip whilst the front is just wide enough to steer in the direction. Most inner tubes will work over quite a range of tyre sizes & the same for rims. Make sure you check the specification of both if you are concerned.


3

Yes, absolutely. Spend an extra 20 dollars on good tires and you could save yourself 30 dollars worth of tubes. Plan on spending somewhere around 40 to 50 dollars a tire. Even if tubes were free, the money is worth saving the hours spent on the side of the road dealing with flats. Look for tires in the 'training' or 'commuting' category, for extra puncture ...


0

If the tube leaks out from under the wire bead it will burst. If you had a cheap tire with a stretched bead that can happen. If it is real easy to slide the tire on the rim that is a bad sign. If that was how the burst happened then a new tire would help. This can happen on even a good new tires if you over inflate too far. If it bursts again the you ...


3

Its extremely unlikely for an inner tube to just burst. It sounds like you are suffering from punctures. There are two types of puncture; the first is an object penetrating the tire and inner tube, and the second is a 'pinch' puncture where an impact causes the inner tube to be pinched between the tire and rim. Many bikes (even expensive ones) come with ...


2

You can confirm tyre fit using the ETRTO spec, which should be specified on the sidewalls of your Kendas and the tyres that were previously fitted. the format is ww-ddd where ww is the nominal tyre width (often measured at the widest point when fitted to the manufacturer's test rim, rather than at the tread) in millimetres, and ddd is the bead diameter ...


0

I assume that: you run stock Trek 3500 so you have 2 inch tyres you are not 200lbs (judging by your photo, location and fever for fitness in your profile) Start with 40 PSI on the rear and 35 PSI on the front and ride at that pressure for a couple of rides to understand how it feels. Then adjust +-3 PSI to see how the handling changes. If you ever get a ...


1

Some general advice: The bend/wobble is likely nothing to worry about and you can search this site or Google for how to true a wheel. If there's less than 1mm of un-true-ness, I wouldn't even worry about truing it. A new wheelset will likely cost more than the bike, and since it sounds like you have a perfectly good one on the bike already it's hard to ...



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