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16

Minimally, you want to be able to tighten all of the bolts on your bike (likely a few hex keys will do this) and an appropriate screwdriver for adjusting derailer & brake pulls. Separate from a multi-tool, a pair of tire levers are the other tool you should carry with you. I would add a chain tool to the above list after being left in a state where I ...


15

A mobile phone. These days, irrespective of where you're riding, what you're riding and over what terrain or distance, there's no excuse for being deliberately out of contact. We can't guarantee being in an area of reception, but if you haven't got a phone you'll never know. Additionally, a huge benefit of smart phones are the apps that can do more than ...


13

I would classify tools into two groups. The ones you ride with, and the ones you keep at home. There may be a bunch of overlap, but it is harder to work with a multi-purpose tool, so if you end up using one tool all the time, a purpose-specific tool may be worth the purchase. Tools to carry with you: Tire levers. Patch Kit. Multi Tool. There are a ...


12

For use at home, there's no question that separate keys are more useful and more economical. A multi-tool has limitations that make it cumbersome to use in tight spots because all the keys are attached to the tool. Separate keys suffer no such limitation. Separate keys can be bought and replaced individually and very inexpensively -- not so with a ...


11

Here's what I normally bring: Spare tube Tire levers (for changing the tube) Pump (or CO2 inflator) 4, 5, and 6mm allen wrenches (for adjusting/tightening the saddle or seat post during the ride, but also to tighten many other things on the bike that could come loose) To me, for the long rides that I do, everything beyond this basic equipment provides ...


11

It depends to what level you want to disassemble. For general cleaning your list is a good start. As you dig deeper though you'll also need: To service/adjust drivetrain Various spanners and screwdrivers to adjust cables Wire cutters if replacing cables To service wheels/hubs 15mm spanner to remove wheels (unless you have quick release hubs) Chain ...


11

The 'official' tool that engages with that bumpy collar is the Shimano TL-PD-40 bearing shaft removal tool. It's a plastic tool designed to be used with a larger wrench, or a vice. Here's a pic: TL-PD-40 If you're interested in servicing your pedals using this tool and others, here's a how-to from Park Tool: ...


10

Interesting tool. I haven't used one but can sympathize after breaking many tire levers with my old tire+rim combination. It's no fun being in the middle of nowhere and snapping a lever while fixing a flat. I've since switched tires (and later the rims) and can now roll the tires over the rim by hand -- what a difference! Unless you plan on taking this ...


10

For repairs, I always carry with me: a saddle bag to conveniently carry all my supplies a multitool for adjusting anything, fixing the chain, and anything else a spare tube to repair flat tires two CO2 cartridges and a CO2 nozzle to inflate my tires back up to high pressures; I bring two so if I waste one on a punctured tube, I have a backup on hand a pair ...


10

In my opinion, minimal set of what to carry: Water (bottle in a bottle cage) pump, CO2 valve and a couple CO2 cartridges, or a pump with the CO2 valve and 1 CO2 cartridge. CO2 is faster and smaller, but you can basically only handle as many flats as you have cartridges. tire levers (2 is easier, 1 might be sufficient) 1 spare tube patch kit (pre-glued ...


10

You do this with a tool called torque (sometimes called dynamometric) wrench. Without a tool you can estimate it this way: Make yourself familiar with a weight of 1 kg Apply the force with your simple wrench 10 cm from the bolt in question This will give you 1 Nm of force. To get 5 Nm, use 5 kgs of weight or increase length to 50 cm. The math is simple: ...


9

You can't approximate torque by feel. Loctite, grease, carbon compounds can all alter the 'feel' when you are tightening down bolts and if there was anyway to 'approximate the feel' these variables render it fairly impossible. If you use ti/aluminum bolts, carbon components, high end aluminum do not cheap out, get the torque wrench. If you tend towards ...


8

I've used a Quik Stik for about 17 years pretty successfully. Not totally free of pinch flats, but I think using darkcanuck's technique of putting a bit of air in the tube first really helps. Much better than regular tire levers, although it actually seems to be softening after all these years. Rumor has it that certain brands of kevlar-beaded tires are a ...


8

You can easily find a "bicycle multitool"/"multi bicycle tool"/"bike multifunction tool" that covers all the basic essentials in one tool. There's tons of brands and models and what's most readily available may vary regionally, but common brands I've seen are: Park, Crank Brothers, Topeak, Serfas. Where? I would go to my local bicycle shop to get them, or ...


8

The number-one situation cyclists will face on a ride (aside from experiencing the awesomeness that is riding) is a flat tire. To fix that, you'll want either a spare tube or a patch kit -- or both. Of course, these are useless without something to pump them up! A frame pump or a C02 inflator will take care of that. Make sure to bring a cartridge for the C02 ...


8

It's a wrench that will work on a range of different size nuts and bolts. Each step on the top ramp will grab a different size. A further advantage is that it will work equally well (or badly) on four sided nuts, and on five and seven sided "security" bolts that a conventional adjustable wrench with parallel jaws will not work on. It will not work ...


7

I don't have the wit to convey the knuckle on chain-teeth pain that happens when taking old pedals out, however, how about 'backwards in, forwards out' ? The thinking being that when you put new pedals in you have to turn the chainset backwards with your trusty 15mm spanner on the pedal and vice-versa for taking old pedals out.


7

Seems that we are going a bit heavy on carrying the tools here... I would advise that you prepare the bike beforehand so that it is not going to be a problem on the road. That means getting it working mechanically perfect a few weeks before you go rather than the night before. Far too often a service will introduce problems, e.g. a bolt that has been put ...


7

There are several versions of SRAMs power links. The original versions were intended for reuse, and you would have no problem using them in that manner. If you have an 8 or 9 speed bike, you've got one of the original designs. If you have a ten speed SRAM drivetrain, then you need to look at the link and the model of the chain. SRAMs newest power links for ...


7

It largely depends on the usage you want to make of them and the particular tire/rim combination you use. Plastic levers are usually small and lightweight, and if they are of good quality, they are enough for most tires that are properly fitted to the rim. I mention this because sometimes, rims and tires can physically differ from the nominal size they bear ...


6

In my area, Community Cycles is a non-profit organization promoting bike riding. For a modest membership fee (less than the price of a torque wrench) one gets access to their bike shop's tools. Their site includes a list of other bike collectives in North America, which might be a good alternative to buying your own tools each time you need a new one.


6

Lessee -- roughly in priority order -- Water. Even on a short 30-minute ride I always carry water. Not that I drink that much on a short ride, but should I fall and get "road rash" a squirt of water can quiet the burn and make it possible to complete the ride in relative comfort. Spare tube, tire "irons" (I prefer a "Slick Stick"), and a decent frame ...


6

Simple: To figure out which way something is threaded, figure out why it's threaded that way. The reason for thread directions on rotating objects with lateral load In general, the thread direction is NOT chosen so that friction from the rotating shaft will tend to tighten things. If that were the case, pedals would be left-hand threaded on the right side ...


6

The first one -- the simple Park Tool gauge, is perfectly adequate for most uses. It provides two levels of indication, and is reasonably inexpensive and foolproof. The second one is maybe a little better, in that it gives you a sense of how close to the "break points" you are. With either of the first two, and some other designs, one needs to be careful ...


6

The bottom ring is used to provide tension against the bearings to stop the headset from wobbling around. It only needs to be hand tight, hence no spanner/tool attachments. The middle and top ring are tightened against each other, as a lock ring to prevent the bottom ring from loosening. The top ring can be tightened with any spanner of the right size. ...


5

This link doesn't have printable plans, but a small pic and a detailed description. Basically it's a connected set of slots that sit on the floor. I've seen slot-based racks at triathlons lately. If you are willing to expand your materials to PVC, I have built 4 racks that are variations of this plan. I think this has three advantages over wood: PVC is ...


5

Information about the specific components would help. I am not sure what will break first, but the derailleurs will probably be the first component to need servicing - especially if you purchased this bike from a sporting goods retailer instead of a bike shop. Brakes will probably be needing some love in the near future. If you ride on trails at all the fork ...



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