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10

You do this with a tool called torque (sometimes called dynamometric) wrench. Without a tool you can estimate it this way: Make yourself familiar with a weight of 1 kg Apply the force with your simple wrench 10 cm from the bolt in question This will give you 1 Nm of force. To get 5 Nm, use 5 kgs of weight or increase length to 50 cm. The math is simple: ...


8

It's a wrench that will work on a range of different size nuts and bolts. Each step on the top ramp will grab a different size. A further advantage is that it will work equally well (or badly) on four sided nuts, and on five and seven sided "security" bolts that a conventional adjustable wrench with parallel jaws will not work on. It will not work ...


7

It largely depends on the usage you want to make of them and the particular tire/rim combination you use. Plastic levers are usually small and lightweight, and if they are of good quality, they are enough for most tires that are properly fitted to the rim. I mention this because sometimes, rims and tires can physically differ from the nominal size they bear ...


6

A road groupset usually consists of a number of parts. There are not many tools, and they are generally not that expensive. With all the resources out there (youtube, sheldon brown website, etc) and basic mechanical aptitude it isn't a difficult task. You need basic hand/bike tools, (hammer, metric allen keys/drivers, screwdrivers, pliers, socket set, ...


5

We have a terminology index here that should help you with the more common names. Please feel free to suggest anything that is missing (we do try to keep adding things that are missing) Unfortunately it doesn't currently have the things you're asking about. The part you've shown is a freewheel, and the tool is called a freewheel remover. You also need a ...


5

You will need a specialty tool referred to as a crank remover or crank extractor. A Park Tool CCP22 or something similar. I would suggest considering the Park Tool CWP7 or equivalent as it offers increased flexibility. While the CCP22 is suggested for square shaft interface the CWP7 will do square, splined and octolink. While you only need the square type ...


5

As this is an older octalink crankset/BB you will require a: Crank Extractor like this to remove the cranks. Bottom Bracket tool like this to remove the bottom bracket. Dust cap removal tool (if it has these) like this 8 or 10mm hex wrench for crank bolts. This is likely to require a lot of effort to free up after 12 years so I'd recommend a repair ...


3

Not something I do often enough to worry about, but certainly a 'problem' I also have.... One solutiojn that comes to mind is write "Install" and "Remove" in the side of the handle you can see when installing and removing (My luck would be I would get it wrong way round).


3

You likely want a floor (track) pump - something that looks like this: (Image from here) Most good floor (track) pumps have support for both Presta and Schrader valves, usually through two opposite ends of the chuck: (Image from here) If your pump only supports Schrader valves but you have a Presta valve, you can go to your bike shop and buy an ...


3

If you have a modern bicycle, it's a cassette in English. And the tools are a chain whip and a lockout ring remover or cassette remover. With Chain Reaction and Wiggle it is possible to choose French for the language, even if you are in England (I do the opposite in France ;-) )


2

I think it depends on your frame, I have a 1973 Peugeot UO-8 which I replaced the 27inch wheels with 700 28CC and even replaced the handle bars with modern alu bars from MEC. The seat is now a Brooks and because the seat post tubes on french bikes are smaller I had to use a BMX chromoly post. My bottom bracket is a new square one from Velo-Orange instead of ...


2

Good plastic levers are wide, made of hard but resilient plastic and work well. Being wide means they are stronger than a narrow plastic lever without being thicker (which would make them harder to push under the bead). The S-shaped hook on the end grips the bead well and the other side of the S hooks onto the rim, so the lever stays in place as you lift the ...


1

Plastic tire levers are more likely (than metal) to break. Especially over many uses, they'll eventually fatigue. They also tend to flex more. Metal tire levers are more likely (than plastic) to damage the wheel rim. It's also possible to get plastic-coated metal levers that get the best of both worlds. Unless you're in a shop and using the levers dozens ...


1

I use a torque wrench because I like a little piece of mind, and have unfortunately ruined a few parts by over tightening. I have a Wright Tool torque wrench which is perfect. No complaints and no more broken components. You can pick one up for a decent price off ebay.


1

I was changing some pedals over today and I noticed that (from the top/12 o'clock) the spanner needs to go towards the rear wheel to loosen and towards the front wheel to tighten. It helped me more than "clockwise" because I was inserting the allen key into the back of the pedal so it was all backwards if you were thinking about "clockwise", etc.



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