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10

This is not going to work. You won't permanently change the shape of the rim by just smooshing it between two concrete discs, as in order to permanently bend metal you need to exceed the yield stress of the metal and plastically deform it. This means that to bend something to a shape, it has to be precisely bent further than its ultimate designed bend, then ...


7

A road groupset usually consists of a number of parts. There are not many tools, and they are generally not that expensive. With all the resources out there (youtube, sheldon brown website, etc) and basic mechanical aptitude it isn't a difficult task. You need basic hand/bike tools, (hammer, metric allen keys/drivers, screwdrivers, pliers, socket set, ...


6

The wheel should run true radially (up/down) axially (sideways) and should not be twisted (as each spoke applies force at its eyelet, a weakened rim might twist, and this twist might not be noticed whilst truing out axial deflections). The form of the bead interface should be consistent, no dents in any direction (unless the rim is for tubular "stick-on" ...


4

Tools will be dependent on the standards of the bike. A overview would be: General bike stand grease carbon paste torque wrench Headset tools to chase and face head tube bearing press crown race setting tool steerer cutter Drive Train tool to chase and face bb bb bearing press or bb spanner chain breaker cassette tool cable cutters cable ...


4

It's hard to tell whether your crank is a classical design or something new and weird. For the classical design you use a "crank puller". or These look sort of like what you show, but you notice the "barrel" is threaded. You remove the bolt holding the crank on (using a standard "Allen" hex wrench) and then thread in the outer barrel of the puller, ...


3

I've built pretty similar bike recently (5800 groupset, chinese frame), here's the list of tools used: 2-14Nm torque wrench with a set of hex heads. Without it you might crush carbon fiber parts. Hex keys set. Phillips screwdriver. Used only for derailleur adjustment. Bottom bracket tool that came with SM-BB6800. If you didn't get one, make sure you buy ...


3

Not something I do often enough to worry about, but certainly a 'problem' I also have.... One solutiojn that comes to mind is write "Install" and "Remove" in the side of the handle you can see when installing and removing (My luck would be I would get it wrong way round).


3

According to the website for your bike (http://2014.merida-bikes.com/en_int/bikes/cross/cross/2014/crossway-40-md-390.html), you have an SR Suntour XCM crankset. The documentation for that crankset (http://www.srsuntour-cycling.com/bike/chainwheels/XCM-XCM-T428-SQ-OCTA-4212.html) indicates it's compatible with this bottom bracket ...


2

I have never had a problem with Allan keys rounding. Using the correct size, using them correctly (Inserting them fully and not letting them slip out the bolt) and not using too much torque for the bolt size means even cheap Allan keys will last a lifetime. If the bolt head has rusted or has gunk in it, you sometimes cannot easily get the Allan key in all ...


2

If you only need to remove the chain ring then a simple Allen wrench They are typically 5 mm Hex key If they spin then use a flat head screw driver on the the other end but they typically do not spin. There are also chain ring wrenches for the other side if a flat head screw driver does not work. And can use a 10 mm wench on other side but too much to ...


2

I think it depends on your frame, I have a 1973 Peugeot UO-8 which I replaced the 27inch wheels with 700 28CC and even replaced the handle bars with modern alu bars from MEC. The seat is now a Brooks and because the seat post tubes on french bikes are smaller I had to use a BMX chromoly post. My bottom bracket is a new square one from Velo-Orange instead of ...


2

The best ones by far: Shimano TL-CN40, TL-CN41 or TL-CN42. Unique amongst chain tools in that they are as accurate as the ruler method, with the ease and quickness of the slot in tools. They are the only "tool" to do this, i.e. they measure pin wear only, roller wear (which does not matter) is eliminated. Not cheap though, but they are the best and ...


2

All other things being equal, T-shaped Allen wrenches will work better than L-shaped Allen wrenches. When I say T-shaped Allen wrenches, I'm talking about wrenches like these: as well as the 3-way hex wrenches like the one you mention: This is because the shape of these tools allows you to exert pressure from directly above the bolt rather than ...


2

If you are referring to getting to the brake lever bolt from an angle because it is behind the cable then that is when the ball end comes in handy If the bolt is dirty the ball end also penetrates a little better but cleaning the bolt is the better path Use the regular end when you can come in straight for more contact area Even straight on I ...


2

Individually tools are expensive. And some (very) expensive tools you would only use once or a few times are not worth buying. Like Park or Pedros and buy a kit. It seems like a lot but $200 - $400 is a good starter kit. Then just fill in with specialty tools or pay to have the work done. Too many people don't use a torque wrench but with nice bikes ...


2

Assuming you've got the right direction you're turning and its still not budging, use some penetrating oil and/or borrow a breaker bar/vise (and use it carefully). One of the things with your style of tool vs the park tool style of tool is that you can't get as much torque on. In the case of aluminium, its conceivable that theres some corrosion, but ...


1

The COMPLETE set will likely cost more than 3x the cost of your frame and parts. The tool to prepare a bottom bracket is almost 500 bucks all by itself. So I'm not going to answer "the COMPLETE set", especially because your copy/paste wall of text doesn't indicate all of the exact specifications for all your parts, which is needed to know exactly which ...


1

So I ended up bringing the bike into the shop. The friendly bike mechanic had let me borrow and old bottom bracket tool because they didn't have any other tools in stock. Long story short, he ended up using a 6 foot pipe on his bottom bracket tool to get it to move. The tool by itself did no good and the impact wrench did nothing. I think I'm going to buy a ...


1

I'm not a metallurgist, but I would think that once the rim is bent enough that you're looking to straighten it, it's been weakened enough that I wouldn't trust it for riding on.


1

FWIW, I have found allen wrenches that have a ball end to generally be of higher quality and less likely to round off. My experience is that generally the wrench fails long before the bolt. If the wrench gets rounded off, you need to stop using it ASAP. If you are doing lot's of your own bike work, it's worth investing in a set of T-handled allen ...


1

I use a torque wrench because I like a little piece of mind, and have unfortunately ruined a few parts by over tightening. I have a Wright Tool torque wrench which is perfect. No complaints and no more broken components. You can pick one up for a decent price off ebay.



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