Hot answers tagged

6

I'd be very tempted to make a tool roll. You'll need access to a sewing machine that can handle 2-3 layers of canvas, but even most home machines will do that if you're careful (and buy a canvas needle!) You see them mostly today with sets of ring spanners, made of cheap plastic. But in the older days people would generally make them out of canvas, often ...


6

There are a number of options, and this partly depends on how thorough a kit you need to carry with you. (i.e everything for every job, or a typical mechanic's pit kit) The best traveling tool kit I've found is made by B&W International. Their Bike Buddy case is sold either with or without tools included, and is a carry-on friendly, rolling hard case,...


6

You want to remove the wheels, seat post (you may be able to get away with setting this all the way at the bottom or doing nothing depending on how you're storing it), handlebars and pedals. If you can go to your local bike shop and get a (cardboard) box for shipping bikes, the bike should pack in nicely for storage. This video shows you the steps in a nice ...


5

You need a cable cutter. All of the companies that make tools for bikes make them. Here are a few options: http://www.parktool.com/product/professional-cable-and-housing-cutter-cn-10 http://pedros.com/products/tools/brakes-and-shifting/cable-cutter/ http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1030380_-1___400625 As some of the other answers/...


5

You will want: hex/allen key set (check standard vs. metric) pedal wrench ratchet set or box wrenches (crescent wrench as last alternative) gardening gloves to keep your hands clean Ensure that you do not strip the fasteners as metric/standard can be a very close fit sometimes. Save some old t-shirts or towels to wrap around the drive-train to keep it ...


5

I have 2 torque wrenches. One that goes up to 20Nm and another that goes from 20-60(ish)Nm. The little one is necessary for most of the things on my bike like my headset bolts and hollowtech crank bolts (around 7Nm and 14 NM from memory) and the big one is mainly for the cassette (40Nm) and bottom bracket (can't remember) and (just quietly) undoing stuck ...


5

Option 1 - Nothing Many fixed gear riders are short distance, and tend to be close to home. The creed is to remove superfluous things from the bike making it lighter and simpler. Why carry tools at all? All you need is a cellphone, or some way to pay for taxi. Some tyres have a phenomenal puncture resistance, so this makes punctures less likely, at the ...


4

I just called Park Tool. They said the reason they don't advertise it as 11 speed is because it will not work with Campagnolo 11 speed due to the peening. However, for Shimano or SRAM it should be fine. Thanks for the help!


4

There are chain tools out there (for Shimano/SRAM) which are recommended for 10 speed but not 11 speed (and Campagnolo needs a 11 speed chain tool for peening); Pedros makes at least one which they specifically mark this way (the ICM Multi Tool). The problem with using a chain tool not designed for 11 speed might be due to the dimensions of the rivets and ...


4

The "bottom bracket" assembly is loose. It may just be that it's a one-piece "cartridge" and is rattling around in the frame, or it may be that the unit is "loose bearings" and the bearing caps need to be adjusted. Or there may have been some sort of failure of the bearings. Regardless, the whole mess will need to be disassembled to a degree, and that ...


4

Set of Allen (hex) key: usually 4,5 and 6 mm would do the job. You can use these Allen key for disassembling handlebar, stem, seatpost, and most pedals Adjustable wrench or (usually) 15 mm wrench: (check if needed) in order to remove the pedal. You could usually remove the pedal with 8 mm Allen key (sometimes could be 5 mm, 6 mm, or 10 mm). Check if there is ...


4

http://www.parktool.com/assets/img/blog/torque.pdf says various numbers from 4 up to 700 inch-pounds. You probably don't need to worry about 4 inch pounds required to screw the bottom bracket axle cap in correctly, so a tool capable of 30-700 would be perfect. You don't need a torque wrench capable of anything above 700/800, because you do not use them to ...


4

I've used the Park Tools BB30 tool thing and a bar clamp (eg this) to squeeze pressfit bbs in. I can't speak for headsets though. I've found that local bike clubs are a good way of gaining access to specific tools like this. Especially as they can be expensive considering how many times you might need to use them. And you get the bonus of someone who's ...


3

I always say to myself "back off" - as both pedals unscrew towards the back which helps me remember which way to turn.


3

I'm naughty - I use a normal set of 6" side cutters on the inners and outers. On the inners, I use a soldering iron and flux to heat and lightly tin the area where I will cut, then I simply cut it. The solder holds all the strands together, and also makes threading easier. For the outers, I use a super-screw (self-tapping wood screw with a very sharp ...


3

You need a large allen key, often an 8mm to tighten that centre bolt right down. It'll pull the crank arm onto the spindle and secure it. The LH-FSA-AL ring is the self extracting bolt, the internal hex bolt pushes on the back of it to pull the crank off without extra tools. That has a left hand thread so that it doesn't unscrew as the internal bolt ...


2

The easiest thing may be to just think of it as applying the same exact force that you would be if you were riding the bike...


2

KevinC has the right answer - use either a dedicated set of cable cutting pliers from a bike manufacturer (don't use regular pliers or regular cable cutters, they will crush the housing) or use a dremel tool. If using a cable cutting tool, make sure to either use a deburring tool to remove the sharp edges. Most tools have a deburrer built-in. With brake ...


2

For the fiddly stuff (screws, cable ends) one of those could work. They are not very durable, but are extremely inexpensive (I got an identical box for under 1EUR). Look in the electronics (soldering equipment, wires, inexpensive speakers, PCB audio amplifiers) kind of stores.


2

I take a single multitool when I travel to disassemble/reassemble my bike. I have an older model crank brothers tool that they don't make anymore, but something similar is available here. I run pedals that can be taken on and off with a 8mm hex, so I don't need a pedal wrench. Without a complete breakdown of your bike and all it's parts, one would be ...


2

I can't imagine a backpack being a good place for tools in the long run. The lack of structure would drive me bonkers- it'd be so easy to keep losing those little bits in all the cloth folds and seams. If you wanted to go this route, I'd look into bags aimed at photographers since they come with lots of little, structured pockets. This is probably the most ...


2

Take your rear wheel off and visually inspect the cassette. Compare with this answer http://bicycles.stackexchange.com/a/21406/19705 and see which you have. Given bikepedia says 8 speed, its most likely to be a cassette. This is a freehub with a cassette. Note the ring of indentations just inside where it says 12T. That silver ring will unscrew ...


1

Looks to me like it is an american to square taper conversion BB, they look like this out of the frame if that is indeed what it is. If that is correct it may just need tightening, also if the BB shell hasn't been damaged you can just get replacement bearings from you LBS if just the bearings are bad. Either option is relatively inexpensive. Tool wise if ...


1

Any tool that can be used on an 11-speed chain should work to 'break-the-link', i.e. push the pin (rivet) out. I have never updated my Park CT-3 tool in years and have used it on a variety of chain variations, from 8 speed up to 11. You should look for a KMC replacement master link, as most manufacturers do not recommend using other manufacturer's master ...


1

The park tool RT-1 is the original headset cup removal tool for 1 1/8" headset cups. The RT-2 oversized headset removal tool is the correct tool for 1 1/4 and larger cup sizes. That said, the RT-1 can be used, when directed carefully, on 1 1/4" cups also. In my opinion, Park is too liberal in stating what larger headset sizes the RT-1 can work with, ...


1

Outside the box possibilities. Is there something that stops you riding your bike in the winter? Yes winter is colder and wetter, and depending on your location there may be snow. Perhaps a snow bike would be more year-round.... that's a rigid MTB with studded tyres for winter and commuter tyres for summer. Second option is to look at hanging your ...


1

My improvised techniques for when nothing else is around: using end cutters / carpenter's pincers :-) It can work pretty ok for some types of cables, but needs a bit of practice. Cutting inner cables. For the simple (not teflon coated) inner cables, I never had issues cutting them with sharp pincers or regular cable cutters (though some of these are ...


1

This appeared on the local ebay (trademe) today: Looks like its made from 2x2 except for the main ground piece which appears to be a chunk of 8x4, which is about half of a railway sleeper.They're relatively uncommon, so you might prefer to sandwich up three pieces of 4x2 with the short edge down for a 6" wide base. You would want to use galvanised nails ...


1

I use 8 oz. flip-top bottles. They're inexpensive, easy to find, and the top does double duty as a spot applicator. They cost forty-seven cents a piece. I bought four so I could have extra bottles of lube in my car, on my bikes, and in my garage. Their 2-3 business day shipping was very reasonable for where I live (Maryland). http://www.specialtybottle.com/...


1

I have been recently looking into the question of measuring chain wear, and in particular, using a 12" steel rule, or ruler. The 12" ruler I have has markings at one tenth of an inch, so I found it easier to measure a 10 inch section of the chain, then the critical 1% wear equates to one tenth of an inch, (which is 1% of ten inches). When measuring the chain,...



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