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16

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


11

The little rubber tubes are for repairing Woods/Dunlop valves. The valve core does not have any valve mechanism in itself, but relies on the little rubber tube to seal. The tube fits over rounded end of the valve core shown below. Most of new tubes come with similar-looking valve that has a ball and spring mechanism instead of the rubber tube.


10

This is not going to work. You won't permanently change the shape of the rim by just smooshing it between two concrete discs, as in order to permanently bend metal you need to exceed the yield stress of the metal and plastically deform it. This means that to bend something to a shape, it has to be precisely bent further than its ultimate designed bend, then ...


10

Answering as a road cyclist ... For a ride of this duration (less than a day), before starting I take notice of the conditions, and decide what to wear, in how many layers. I want to carry a spare layer to put on during stops, and in case of bad weather. Usually it'll be my lightweight wind and (so called) water proof jacket. Sometimes it's just a ...


6

My ideal packing includes: Tools: Hex keys to fit your bike : 2mm, 4mm, 5mm the most important, 6mm and 8mm. Some bikes use 2.5mm and 3mm. A T25 driver if you have disk brakes. Phillips and flat screwdrivers. Chain tool and a master link or two (may need to remove twisted links). Tire Levers Patches, glue, extra tubes and pump or inflator. Spare Valves, ...


6

Bicycle Helmet Suitable clothing and shoes Cellphone Whatever else you "need" depends on your mechanical abilities and how independent you wish to be.


6

You want to remove the wheels, seat post (you may be able to get away with setting this all the way at the bottom or doing nothing depending on how you're storing it), handlebars and pedals. If you can go to your local bike shop and get a (cardboard) box for shipping bikes, the bike should pack in nicely for storage. This video shows you the steps in a nice ...


5

I measured my PCS9 at: a) 70 cm (27.5") b) 115 cm (45")


5

From the Park Tool support site, here: Base when open forms a triangle of 36” (92 cm) x 36” (92 cm)x 45” (115 cm)


5

You will want: hex/allen key set (check standard vs. metric) pedal wrench ratchet set or box wrenches (crescent wrench as last alternative) gardening gloves to keep your hands clean Ensure that you do not strip the fasteners as metric/standard can be a very close fit sometimes. Save some old t-shirts or towels to wrap around the drive-train to keep it ...


5

Everyone's going to have different list depending on how confident they are of getting assistance in an emergency or gear breakage. I do some solo rides into the forests in New Zealand. When in the forest alone I do tend to stick to 4x4 tracks where a may see one person an hour but also take jungle tracks alongside the road and very rarely see anyone. I ...


5

You need a cable cutter. All of the companies that make tools for bikes make them. Here are a few options: http://www.parktool.com/product/professional-cable-and-housing-cutter-cn-10 http://pedros.com/products/tools/brakes-and-shifting/cable-cutter/ http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1030380_-1___400625 As some of the other ...


5

I have 2 torque wrenches. One that goes up to 20Nm and another that goes from 20-60(ish)Nm. The little one is necessary for most of the things on my bike like my headset bolts and hollowtech crank bolts (around 7Nm and 14 NM from memory) and the big one is mainly for the cassette (40Nm) and bottom bracket (can't remember) and (just quietly) undoing stuck ...


4

Tools will be dependent on the standards of the bike. A overview would be: General bike stand grease carbon paste torque wrench Headset tools to chase and face head tube bearing press crown race setting tool steerer cutter Drive Train tool to chase and face bb bb bearing press or bb spanner chain breaker cassette tool cable cutters cable ...


4

The little tubes are for Dunlop valves. The tube is pulled over a stem. Air pressure will push the the tube against the stem and prevent the loss of air! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valve_stem If you look at the German translation of the page you find more pictures and one of the tubes in use. This type of valve was much used in England and also in Germany ...


4

http://www.parktool.com/assets/img/blog/torque.pdf says various numbers from 4 up to 700 inch-pounds. You probably don't need to worry about 4 inch pounds required to screw the bottom bracket axle cap in correctly, so a tool capable of 30-700 would be perfect. You don't need a torque wrench capable of anything above 700/800, because you do not use them to ...


3

I would go for a good floor pump, as I find it can be extremely important in preventing flats. One big problem I see is underinflated tires. This can cause flats and other problems like rim damage. A good floor pump will make it not so much of a chore to ensure your tires are always properly topped up. If you plan on leaving your bike anywhere except your ...


3

I'm not sure about building a wheel using just the screw slot – I think you could probably do it, but I suspect that it would be a painful process. If you tried it, you'd want to be sure that the spoke lengths were exactly right. Much of the strength of the spoke comes from engaging with the threads in the wider section of the nipple that is on the inside of ...


3

Set of Allen (hex) key: usually 4,5 and 6 mm would do the job. You can use these Allen key for disassembling handlebar, stem, seatpost, and most pedals Adjustable wrench or (usually) 15 mm wrench: (check if needed) in order to remove the pedal. You could usually remove the pedal with 8 mm Allen key (sometimes could be 5 mm, 6 mm, or 10 mm). Check if there ...


3

I've built pretty similar bike recently (5800 groupset, chinese frame), here's the list of tools used: 2-14Nm torque wrench with a set of hex heads. Without it you might crush carbon fiber parts. Hex keys set. Phillips screwdriver. Used only for derailleur adjustment. Bottom bracket tool that came with SM-BB6800. If you didn't get one, make sure you buy ...


3

You need a large allen key, often an 8mm to tighten that centre bolt right down. It'll pull the crank arm onto the spindle and secure it. The LH-FSA-AL ring is the self extracting bolt, the internal hex bolt pushes on the back of it to pull the crank off without extra tools. That has a left hand thread so that it doesn't unscrew as the internal bolt ...


3

Not much: A mini pump mounted on the bike, spare tube, tire leavers and the hex keys you might actually need in a Frame Bag. 1.5l of water with carbs (glucose and maltodextrin) as food. For longer rides an extra plastic bag with enough carbs for another 1.5l in the jersey. I’m usually experienced enough to pick the right clothing for several hours or a ...


3

I always say to myself "back off" - as both pedals unscrew towards the back which helps me remember which way to turn.


3

I'm naughty - I use a normal set of 6" side cutters on the inners and outers. On the inners, I use a soldering iron and flux to heat and lightly tin the area where I will cut, then I simply cut it. The solder holds all the strands together, and also makes threading easier. For the outers, I use a super-screw (self-tapping wood screw with a very sharp ...


2

So, these are all "back of the envelope" estimates... The actual measurements will vary but it will give you an idea. You should maybe send an email to Park or stop by your LBS if they carry these stands confirm the measurements and check my math. Assumption 1- Leg Length From the park tool site link it says that the whole stand folds to 41". If you watch ...


2

Individually tools are expensive. And some (very) expensive tools you would only use once or a few times are not worth buying. Like Park or Pedros and buy a kit. It seems like a lot but $200 - $400 is a good starter kit. Then just fill in with specialty tools or pay to have the work done. Too many people don't use a torque wrench but with nice bikes ...


2

Assuming you've got the right direction you're turning and its still not budging, use some penetrating oil and/or borrow a breaker bar/vise (and use it carefully). One of the things with your style of tool vs the park tool style of tool is that you can't get as much torque on. In the case of aluminium, its conceivable that theres some corrosion, but ...


2

It's a spoke wrench. Similar to this one: http://www.btosports.com/p/bikemaster-spoke-wrench


2

Exact same problem here. Same bike. I got it off finally by just turning really really hard using a non-torque wrench. Make sure it's rotated so that the two dots are UP (12 o'clock). If installed correctly the lock should be at 12 o'clock when wheels are on the ground. So if you installed it in the wrong orientation (i.e. lock at 2 o'clock or 9 o'clock ...


2

I think the best option is to buy a digital torque wrench adapter (for example, this) and check if your wrench "clicks" when the adapter is showing the desired value. It's a bit pricey, but that's how it is, and you can use it many times. You can also send it to a specialized place that do that for you, such as this, but although I am not sure how much this ...



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