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15

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


11

The little rubber tubes are for repairing Woods/Dunlop valves. The valve core does not have any valve mechanism in itself, but relies on the little rubber tube to seal. The tube fits over rounded end of the valve core shown below. Most of new tubes come with similar-looking valve that has a ball and spring mechanism instead of the rubber tube.


10

This is not going to work. You won't permanently change the shape of the rim by just smooshing it between two concrete discs, as in order to permanently bend metal you need to exceed the yield stress of the metal and plastically deform it. This means that to bend something to a shape, it has to be precisely bent further than its ultimate designed bend, then ...


9

Answering as a road cyclist ... For a ride of this duration (less than a day), before starting I take notice of the conditions, and decide what to wear, in how many layers. I want to carry a spare layer to put on during stops, and in case of bad weather. Usually it'll be my lightweight wind and (so called) water proof jacket. Sometimes it's just a ...


6

The wheel should run true radially (up/down) axially (sideways) and should not be twisted (as each spoke applies force at its eyelet, a weakened rim might twist, and this twist might not be noticed whilst truing out axial deflections). The form of the bead interface should be consistent, no dents in any direction (unless the rim is for tubular "stick-on" ...


6

Bicycle Helmet Suitable clothing and shoes Cellphone Whatever else you "need" depends on your mechanical abilities and how independent you wish to be.


6

My ideal packing includes: Tools: Hex keys to fit your bike : 2mm, 4mm, 5mm the most important, 6mm and 8mm. Some bikes use 2.5mm and 3mm. A T25 driver if you have disk brakes. Phillips and flat screwdrivers. Chain tool and a master link or two (may need to remove twisted links). Tire Levers Patches, glue, extra tubes and pump or inflator. Spare Valves, ...


5

I measured my PCS9 at: a) 70 cm (27.5") b) 115 cm (45")


5

From the Park Tool support site, here: Base when open forms a triangle of 36” (92 cm) x 36” (92 cm)x 45” (115 cm)


5

Everyone's going to have different list depending on how confident they are of getting assistance in an emergency or gear breakage. I do some solo rides into the forests in New Zealand. When in the forest alone I do tend to stick to 4x4 tracks where a may see one person an hour but also take jungle tracks alongside the road and very rarely see anyone. I ...


4

It's hard to tell whether your crank is a classical design or something new and weird. For the classical design you use a "crank puller". or These look sort of like what you show, but you notice the "barrel" is threaded. You remove the bolt holding the crank on (using a standard "Allen" hex wrench) and then thread in the outer barrel of the puller, ...


4

Tools will be dependent on the standards of the bike. A overview would be: General bike stand grease carbon paste torque wrench Headset tools to chase and face head tube bearing press crown race setting tool steerer cutter Drive Train tool to chase and face bb bb bearing press or bb spanner chain breaker cassette tool cable cutters cable ...


4

The little tubes are for Dunlop valves. The tube is pulled over a stem. Air pressure will push the the tube against the stem and prevent the loss of air! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valve_stem If you look at the German translation of the page you find more pictures and one of the tubes in use. This type of valve was much used in England and also in Germany ...


3

I would go for a good floor pump, as I find it can be extremely important in preventing flats. One big problem I see is underinflated tires. This can cause flats and other problems like rim damage. A good floor pump will make it not so much of a chore to ensure your tires are always properly topped up. If you plan on leaving your bike anywhere except your ...


3

I'm not sure about building a wheel using just the screw slot – I think you could probably do it, but I suspect that it would be a painful process. If you tried it, you'd want to be sure that the spoke lengths were exactly right. Much of the strength of the spoke comes from engaging with the threads in the wider section of the nipple that is on the inside of ...


3

I've built pretty similar bike recently (5800 groupset, chinese frame), here's the list of tools used: 2-14Nm torque wrench with a set of hex heads. Without it you might crush carbon fiber parts. Hex keys set. Phillips screwdriver. Used only for derailleur adjustment. Bottom bracket tool that came with SM-BB6800. If you didn't get one, make sure you buy ...


3

According to the website for your bike (http://2014.merida-bikes.com/en_int/bikes/cross/cross/2014/crossway-40-md-390.html), you have an SR Suntour XCM crankset. The documentation for that crankset (http://www.srsuntour-cycling.com/bike/chainwheels/XCM-XCM-T428-SQ-OCTA-4212.html) indicates it's compatible with this bottom bracket ...


3

Not much: A mini pump mounted on the bike, spare tube, tire leavers and the hex keys you might actually need in a Frame Bag. 1.5l of water with carbs (glucose and maltodextrin) as food. For longer rides an extra plastic bag with enough carbs for another 1.5l in the jersey. I’m usually experienced enough to pick the right clothing for several hours or a ...


3

You need a large allen key, often an 8mm to tighten that centre bolt right down. It'll pull the crank arm onto the spindle and secure it. The LH-FSA-AL ring is the self extracting bolt, the internal hex bolt pushes on the back of it to pull the crank off without extra tools. That has a left hand thread so that it doesn't unscrew as the internal bolt ...


2

If you only need to remove the chain ring then a simple Allen wrench They are typically 5 mm Hex key If they spin then use a flat head screw driver on the the other end but they typically do not spin. There are also chain ring wrenches for the other side if a flat head screw driver does not work. And can use a 10 mm wench on other side but too much to ...


2

The best ones by far: Shimano TL-CN40, TL-CN41 or TL-CN42. Unique amongst chain tools in that they are as accurate as the ruler method, with the ease and quickness of the slot in tools. They are the only "tool" to do this, i.e. they measure pin wear only, roller wear (which does not matter) is eliminated. Not cheap though, but they are the best and ...


2

Assuming you've got the right direction you're turning and its still not budging, use some penetrating oil and/or borrow a breaker bar/vise (and use it carefully). One of the things with your style of tool vs the park tool style of tool is that you can't get as much torque on. In the case of aluminium, its conceivable that theres some corrosion, but ...


2

I have never had a problem with Allan keys rounding. Using the correct size, using them correctly (Inserting them fully and not letting them slip out the bolt) and not using too much torque for the bolt size means even cheap Allan keys will last a lifetime. If the bolt head has rusted or has gunk in it, you sometimes cannot easily get the Allan key in all ...


2

All other things being equal, T-shaped Allen wrenches will work better than L-shaped Allen wrenches. When I say T-shaped Allen wrenches, I'm talking about wrenches like these: as well as the 3-way hex wrenches like the one you mention: This is because the shape of these tools allows you to exert pressure from directly above the bolt rather than ...


2

If you are referring to getting to the brake lever bolt from an angle because it is behind the cable then that is when the ball end comes in handy If the bolt is dirty the ball end also penetrates a little better but cleaning the bolt is the better path Use the regular end when you can come in straight for more contact area Even straight on I ...


2

Exact same problem here. Same bike. I got it off finally by just turning really really hard using a non-torque wrench. Make sure it's rotated so that the two dots are UP (12 o'clock). If installed correctly the lock should be at 12 o'clock when wheels are on the ground. So if you installed it in the wrong orientation (i.e. lock at 2 o'clock or 9 o'clock ...


2

It's a spoke wrench. Similar to this one: http://www.btosports.com/p/bikemaster-spoke-wrench


2

Individually tools are expensive. And some (very) expensive tools you would only use once or a few times are not worth buying. Like Park or Pedros and buy a kit. It seems like a lot but $200 - $400 is a good starter kit. Then just fill in with specialty tools or pay to have the work done. Too many people don't use a torque wrench but with nice bikes ...


2

So, these are all "back of the envelope" estimates... The actual measurements will vary but it will give you an idea. You should maybe send an email to Park or stop by your LBS if they carry these stands confirm the measurements and check my math. Assumption 1- Leg Length From the park tool site link it says that the whole stand folds to 41". If you watch ...


1

If you already have the usual tools and clothing you can always need more of the typical wear parts: Tires, tubes, chains, brake pads, chain oil, cables, pants … Otherwise I’d start with a proper stand pump, mini pump (for on the bike), tubes, chain tool, hex keys, lock, bottles, helmet … Clothing is of course essential but hard to guess the right size for ...



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