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3

The "bottom bracket" assembly is loose. It may just be that it's a one-piece "cartridge" and is rattling around in the frame, or it may be that the unit is "loose bearings" and the bearing caps need to be adjusted. Or there may have been some sort of failure of the bearings. Regardless, the whole mess will need to be disassembled to a degree, and that ...


0

Looks to me like it is an american to square taper conversion BB, they look like this out of the frame if that is indeed what it is. If that is correct it may just need tightening, also if the BB shell hasn't been damaged you can just get replacement bearings from you LBS if just the bearings are bad. Either option is relatively inexpensive. Tool wise if ...


1

For the fiddly stuff (screws, cable ends) one of those could work. They are not very durable, but are extremely inexpensive (I got an identical box for under 1EUR). Look in the electronics (soldering equipment, wires, inexpensive speakers, PCB audio amplifiers) kind of stores.


5

I'd be very tempted to make a tool roll. You'll need access to a sewing machine that can handle 2-3 layers of canvas, but even most home machines will do that if you're careful (and buy a canvas needle!) You see them mostly today with sets of ring spanners, made of cheap plastic. But in the older days people would generally make them out of canvas, often ...


1

This appeared on the local ebay (trademe) today: Looks like its made from 2x2 except for the main ground piece which appears to be a chunk of 8x4, which is about half of a railway sleeper.They're relatively uncommon, so you might prefer to sandwich up three pieces of 4x2 with the short edge down for a 6" wide base. You would want to use galvanised nails ...


6

There are a number of options, and this partly depends on how thorough a kit you need to carry with you. (i.e everything for every job, or a typical mechanic's pit kit) The best traveling tool kit I've found is made by B&W International. Their Bike Buddy case is sold either with or without tools included, and is a carry-on friendly, rolling hard ...


2

I can't imagine a backpack being a good place for tools in the long run. The lack of structure would drive me bonkers- it'd be so easy to keep losing those little bits in all the cloth folds and seams. If you wanted to go this route, I'd look into bags aimed at photographers since they come with lots of little, structured pockets. This is probably the most ...


1

Any tool that can be used on an 11-speed chain should work to 'break-the-link', i.e. push the pin (rivet) out. I have never updated my Park CT-3 tool in years and have used it on a variety of chain variations, from 8 speed up to 11. You should look for a KMC replacement master link, as most manufacturers do not recommend using other manufacturer's master ...



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