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12

You should find that on those bikes everything is a bit stronger and heavier than a standard touring bike. Not only are they expected to carry more weight, they're designed to be ridden into places where failures are more difficult to recover from. As well, because they're designed to be ridden off road they'll usually have a lower top tube for better ...


11

There are a lot of question so I will settle on the one in the title. How many years will an current aluminum frame last of a touring bike? Depends: Don't know what aluminum frame Construction is a larger factor than material Don't know the use Use is a larger factor than material Don't know how you are going to care for the bike Care/maintenance is ...


9

There are a couple of reasons. The KISS Principle If anything vital breaks while you're touring and you can't fix it on the spot, you're stranded. You're too far from home to call your mom for a ride. Unless you have a spare for the broken part, your options are some DIY jerry rigging and/or praying that someone with a truck comes by who will carry you and ...


8

'Bulk' is mostly about whether all of your luggage will fit in your bags. ie is the volume of your luggage less than the capacity of your bags. So it depends on how much stuff you want to take, and how big your panniers are. Aerodynamics doesn't really matter for touring. Unless you are cycling rather fast, or it is very windy. Usually the weight of your ...


7

Short and simple... Nobody with the cash to spend on a high end touring bike thinks they are worthwhile. Given the increasing specialization in the bike market, they only reason they don't exist is nobody will buy them.


7

Mid range touring bikes come with shocks because because mid range consumers will buy them. Department store bikes come with full suspension because people buy them. High end touring bikes don't come with shocks because high end consumers don't see the value. A bicycle does not need to be used for how it is classified/designed. I use a cyclocross with ...


5

My suspicion is that they add to the cost and most tourists prefer to spend that money on something else. The touring market is also small enough that it's unlikely any manufacturer makes a touring-specific suspension fork. But as you've found, front suspension bikes are still available. At the high end you're probably going to be better off getting a custom ...


5

Any bike can be used for touring long distances. The main question is, what type of touring do you want to do? If you want to do self-supported touring (you carry the luggage yourself on the bike vs. a car transports the stuff for the whole group), you need a bike that can take luggage. The other main feature I look for in a touring bike is comfort, ...


4

I am not a doctor, but its sound like you might be suffering Post Traumatic Stress, and should seek professional help to rule it out or get treatment. You should be concerned about the 10 critical accidents (I read critical that as hospital/doctors visits and time off school/work, not a mere "off" ). You are likely riding beyond you limits, and need to ...


3

I researched more on this topic. The short answer is that an aluminium frame can last from a couple of years to 50 years/lifetime. The long answer is: The main factor is fatigue (not counting accidents): "The tendency of a material (metal) to break under repeated cyclic loading at a stress considerably less then the tensile strength in a static test." ...


3

Expedition bikes You will see "expedition" bike at manufacturers who are specialized in touring bikes, and have many models. The marketing department needs to differentiate somehow, so the common groups are called trekking, touring, expedition. But this can vary, and for me the expedition is usually the top bike in their offering, with the most expensive ...


3

I think you would find the bike handles reasonably on single track, 4x4 tracks and dirt paths but there are a few things to bear in mind. I'd ride single track but stick to trails graded easy. Where an MTB would be mandatory would be anything above that. The following features would require a MTB (or at least no gear or being on a short ride ie. mud). ...


2

My first priority is reliability, the second is comfort. I spend 3-5 hours a day in the saddle, day after day. Light components are not a priority, I get reliable ones. Wheels: Ryde/Rigida Andra are very strong ones. Tyres: Schwalbe Marathon puncture proof Saddle: Brooks are good, or SQ Lab - comfort is very important, try before you go Handlebars: Ergon ...


2

If you would like to change to the FC-M660 cranks you are going to have to purchase a new hollowtech ii compatible bottom bracket and change everything. The octalink is a cartridge bottom bracket and the hollowtech ii is an external bearing bottom bracket. The cranks aren't compatible between the two interfaces. You can get away without a crank bolt as this ...


2

Here is another take on "bulk". At the time I completed the tour this photo was taken on I was using a home made quilt as my sleeping "bag". The quilt is the item in the blue/gray Sea to Summit dry bag sitting on top of the Extrawheel Voyager trailer. Now the quilt is not that heavy but it is clearly quite bulky taking up a lot of space, so much space that ...


2

I switched from an aluminum fork to carbon and the brakes howled like crazy. I went the usual route of cleaning, adjusting etc. What worked is counterintuitive, but I toed the shoes out. The noise went away immediately. I read somewhere that it can have something to do with the harmonics of the carbon fork. So I have the rears toed in and the front toed out ...


2

I have a bike with cantilevers and I can understand the frustration. I spent a lot of time last summer getting my brake pads aligned properly so they didn't squeal. In the end I got it to work with the brakes I had, but it took quite a lot of futzing around to get the angle just right. Some people recommend getting a fork crown mounted cable stop to ...


2

This bike is a poor choice for any touring where you have to carry things (if you're doing a supported tour, you may be able to pass with it). It doesn't have rack+fender mounts and doesn't have particularly tough wheels. Depending on the type of touring you're doing, you should look at some touring bikes like the Surly Long Haul Trucker or Trek 520. ...


1

I also like speed and racing, but after some close calls (nowhere close to yours) I decided to push my limits going UPHILL, go faster in that 17% climb where 10 mph is the speed of light. And outside of bicycles, there are infinite challenges, running a mile under 5 minutes, learning to swim butterfly, or in strength training, going for the gimnastic ...


1

I would try something less expensive first. For me, switching to Kool Stop brake pads has worked even better than toeing in when in resolving this type of vibration. I'm not surprised that replacing the front wheel didn't affect the problem since it's not likely to be the cause of the vibration.


1

I haven't built a bike trailer but used a B.O.B. Yak for a trip from the UK down through Europe. It was a great trailer and we were able to fit a large 2-man tent in there plus other stuff. We also had front and back panniers. See here: http://www.bobgear.com/bike-trailers/yak I now use a Burley D'Lite with 2 toddlers in it. Even though you could fit ...


1

Yes, you can use that bike for touring. Probably not "proper loaded touring" which is the most traditional type, but light touring, i.e. sleeping in hotels and not carrying a lot of food or luxury items like a laptop. You have a few options to outfit the bike with a modest amount of cargo capacity: Tubus Fly Classic rear rack with the Tubus QR axle ...


1

The Novara Safari is a bike designed for off road touring. Novara Safari Bike With a load you are not going to be doing real technical stuff. But you should be a be able to handle "improved trails". The biggest tires it will take is the best thing you can do - and practice. The link says it has Alex ATD 470 rims. Those are not high end rims and more of a ...


1

I also have enjoyed riding with a Cannondale Headshok (Silk Tour 700). I agree with you, weight and stiffness are non-issues with HeadShok type suspension, I think they are fantastic for producing a comfortable aluminium tourer but I may be biased! I think that people who have not riden this type of shock don't understand its advantages. When it is locked ...


1

According to bike rumors, these two bikes have different Cr-Mo tubing, with one being a higher end material. You can find more information here


1

I have a Surly Long Haul Trucker which came stock with dropbars and Tektro 992 “Oryx” brakes cantilever brakes and levers. I have now switched out those cantilever brakes out for Avid Single Digit 7 v-brakes and to specifically answer your question fitted Cane Creek Drop V brake levers. These are not integrated shifter levers but, so I still have my bar-end ...


1

If you are planning for a loaded tour, lightweight equipment is the opposite of what you want— the bike is a relatively small proportion of the total weight of bike + gear. Strong wheels are one of the most important components, since failures are difficult to repair and have potential to end the trip— overbuilt wheels with a high spoke count for ...



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