Hot answers tagged

18

First, congratulations on trying to do this, and doing some research before your try. The bike really doesn't matter very much. You can ride 500 miles carrying enough stuff to be comfortable on just about any bike, a better bike will be faster, more comfortable and more reliable. But I've been on a 3000 mile ride with a couple of people who rode KMart-level ...


11

I'm going to attack this backwards. First of all, camping is the only way you won't have to worry all day about where you're going to sleep. Provided you don't take a route through inhospitable areas, the beauty of planning to camp is in most areas down there, you can pull over, a good distance from the road, and set up camp. It will probably be cold at ...


8

They're called simply chainring bolts. The tool to hold the other part while tightening is chainring bolt wrench.


7

Don't do this as your first multi-day tour. The trip you've proposed has hazards which will test even the most experienced riders, and you'll need to plan very carefully if you want to make it to Tucson alive. There are some things I'm quite surprised no one mentioned about this particular route: First, there's basically one route for cycling from LA to ...


6

There was a questionnaire on Bikeforums on this topic and here you can see the results: Brifters - how reliable are they? 39 people gave their votes and obviously for most people brifters did not break at all. The second question is about working optimally. To be honest I am yet to see a brifter which does not work optimally. Brifters have very little to no ...


5

A great idea for a bicycle trip but not the best time of year. If you can travel before the middle of May or after Oct it would be more enjoyable. Be prepared for extreamly high temperatures in the deserts from LA to Tucson. During the summers once you get 20 miles from the ocean you will likely experience temperatures of over 100 F during the day and ...


5

To do 528 miles through the desert, in monsoon season, in less than a week is going to be quite an ordeal. You are looking at averaging 75 miles a day to do it in 7 days. You'll be out alone, in the middle of nowhere. I won't say you can't do it, because it can be done. But it's clear you've never done anything of this magnitude. Lots of posts have given ...


5

I have some BR-IM45s, and some BR-IM70s (which have large cooling fins), on a couple of my bikes, although they're only used for relatively lightly-loaded commuting (typically only around 20m per day, load of around 15kgs, rolling along at 15mph). They're actually pretty easy to strip down and service, though this simply consists of disassembly, degrease, ...


5

It's no myth that decent 700s are hard to come by. I'm in Huaraz, Peru trying to find a wider tire for my Fargo to get off pavement. There are no Schwalbes to be found anywhere in this country. Mail order is unreliable as customs may or may NOT impose an incredibly high import tax. OR they might just not release a mail order for months. Geometry, cycle ...


4

I wonder if you were looking at the macho man disc, which has a steel frame and only comes in white/red: http://allcitycycles.com/bikes/macho_man_disc


4

It's possible you could find a used tourer for around $200-300. Keep an eye out for used Salsa and Surly bikes, as well as used Trek 520s (the 520 line dates back nearly to Trek's beginnings, so it's likely you'll find one), but failing that look for a used hybrid or mountain bike. These bikes have good low-end gearing, which'll be handy when you encounter ...


4

Except that a "cheap mountain bike" is, in most cases, the wrong answer. The two main reasons being: hand position: drop bars allow you a variety of grips. Not much fun riding 500km if your hands numb up. There are a variety of handle bar styles besides just drop and straight. knobby tires. These can make a huge difference in how fast you go and or in how ...


4

This is an opinion question. But this is my take on it. I have bar-end shifters on our tandem, brifters on my race and commuter bikes, and downtube shifters on a training bike. They are all extremely reliable. The bar-end shifters that I have are indexed, but they can be adjusted to run in a 'friction mode'. That is handy for swapping rear-wheels ...


4

Old steel hybrids work pretty well for converting to a touring application. Like others have said the ideal build depends on how much your going to carry and the distances you plan on going. Obviously comfort is a big factor as well. Fenders are necessary if you plan on doing any distance at all really. With that said yes, I would lean toward a road style ...


4

That looks as though it was chrome plated after it was welded together, which means cleaning it up so you can safely weld it again is going to be tedious. You'll need to clean the chrome off anything that will get hot, and afterwards painting it will not look that great. It would probably be cheaper to build a new rack. One repair option that occurs to me ...


3

There's two different situations here. The first time disks are set up after installation can be a lot of work. The calipers need to be fixed in the right position, which can involve a special tool to shave a little off the mounts to get them square and parallel to each other, then some precise setting of the mounting adapters and positioning of the caliper ...


3

The reliability depends on the quality of the brifter itself but, for most brifters, all you need to maintain, adjust, and them and keep them in good working condition is a hex key set, some spray degreaser, and a high quality grease. I use mostly sram brifters and they just work when they are set up right. To keep them in good working order I remove the ...


3

If you get a 3 x 10 STI shifter, the front (Sora) shifter will work fine. For the rear, you're going to need to replace it with a 10 speed Shimano road rear derailleur or a 7-9 speed Shimano rear derailleur due to the change in cable pull (7-9 speed and 10 speed road use the same cable pull in Shimano. 10 speed mountain does something else). Note that the ...


3

Bang for buck would suggest an aluminum rack, but these typically don't support high loads. Once you start heading into the 20-30+ kg range steel performs better in terms of total load capacity and behavior under load (I.e., less flex which reduces the chance of a shimmy). In terms of steel I have had good luck with Tubus and hear good things about Surly ...


3

I do have experience with both IM-70R/F roller and Sturmey Archer XL-FD (90mm) and X-RDC (70mm) drum brakes. Same bike, same usage, same city commuting. My experience shows that IM-70s bake oil on descents and fail. It happens on fast long descents. I do have a 1 km long fast descent (up to 60kph). When you try to stop the bike quickly at the end of it IM-...


3

My brifters date from 1997 and are "early tech" When I got it, they shifted poorly, with a really annoying habit of changing down and then not changing back up. I blasted them with brake cleaner and various oils and fluids which helped, but the only fix was a teardown and soak the guts of it in petrol for a day, to soften the old hardened grease. Now it ...


3

There are a lot of factors that go into your speed and efficiency, and this switch touches several of them: Rider Position: Typically, a bike with touring geometry will have a slightly longer wheelbase, and lower bottom bracket. Along with other geometry tweeks, the result is that on a touring bike you are likely to be in a slightly more upright position, ...


3

Those are called gumwalls. With this keyword you can easily search for them. Brands I see mounted on my friend's bikes are the likes of bontrager, panaracer, schwalbe, but Id say that most tyre manufacturers have a gumwall offer.


2

Roller brakes are suitable for touring I've been using Shimano Nexus BR-IM70-R(ear) roller brake for the last 10 years (48 kkm, a few tours some in mountains) as my main brake. Many times I had sore fingers from squeezing brake levers and I've had 1 failure. I think it was 2 years ago, I cycled down a very steep (15 % ? 20 %? - I had an altimeter but I don'...


2

If you're friction shifting go with the Dia Compe. They have a ratcheting mechanism in them originally developed by SunTour to counteract the spring in the derailleur. This gives them a very even feel in both directions - you apply as much pressure to upshift as to downshift. They also look better on older bikes. The Shimano shifters OTOH rely purely on ...


2

It will work, but you will add considerably more housing and 2-3 more bends in the housing. The additional bends will introduce friction which will affect shifting performance, but it should be usable if the cable and housing are good quality and you avoid damaging the cable during installation.


2

1) As in Scotland, I would recommend you to look for a second-hand bike (possibly gumtree is a good place to start with, bear in mind that you need to check and make sure the bike is not stolen). The reason is that in the winter, all the salt on the roads will corrode your bike badly.So go cheap, then keep it as winter bike, then upgrade gradually. ...


2

As other have stated road discs are becoming more common. While hydraulic discs will give you the best performance, it comes at considerable cost. New shifters would be needed. Mechanical disc would reuse your shifters. I would put mechanical disc as a cost effective alternative. If this is an upgrade it is important to use road specific calipers. Mountain ...


2

I think its totally fixable. I know of metalworkers who would relish the two-part challenge of this. how to fix it how to make it better than new Downside - it won't be cheap. You're probably looking at a sandblast to clean all the chrome off, to make welding work better. Then the metal worker would either tack weld it together and weld on some ...


2

Panaracer Pasela PT are an excellent road/light touring tan sidewall tire, but they're lighter than the Marathon, which is more of a heavy duty loaded touring/urban tire. There's also the Rivendell Ruffy Tuffy, which are decent but I like the Pasela PT more. The Black/Tan version of the Michelin World Tour is in the same genre as the Marathon but not as ...



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