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9

Their main problem is your first bullet hypothesis: They can't cope as well with sustained braking on descent, as that is where brakes are challenged the hardest. Even with the extra cooling fins, on a long descent, the brake may overheat, and may catastrophically fail. Riders using roller brakes have reported the brakes getting hot enough to ignite the ...


7

As has been pointed out, closed brakes are not ideal from the standpoint of disipating the energy built up through friction. This has also been experienced in the automotive world, where drum brakes were standard during many decades. Some would say they still are, e.g. on rear axels of light commercial vehicles such as pick-up trucks. However, although ...


4

I am not a doctor, but its sound like you might be suffering Post Traumatic Stress, and should seek professional help to rule it out or get treatment. You should be concerned about the 10 critical accidents (I read critical that as hospital/doctors visits and time off school/work, not a mere "off" ). You are likely riding beyond you limits, and need to ...


3

Bang for buck would suggest an aluminum rack, but these typically don't support high loads. Once you start heading into the 20-30+ kg range steel performs better in terms of total load capacity and behavior under load (I.e., less flex which reduces the chance of a shimmy). In terms of steel I have had good luck with Tubus and hear good things about Surly ...


3

I think you would find the bike handles reasonably on single track, 4x4 tracks and dirt paths but there are a few things to bear in mind. I'd ride single track but stick to trails graded easy. Where an MTB would be mandatory would be anything above that. The following features would require a MTB (or at least no gear or being on a short ride ie. mud). ...


2

I switched from an aluminum fork to carbon and the brakes howled like crazy. I went the usual route of cleaning, adjusting etc. What worked is counterintuitive, but I toed the shoes out. The noise went away immediately. I read somewhere that it can have something to do with the harmonics of the carbon fork. So I have the rears toed in and the front toed out ...


2

I have a bike with cantilevers and I can understand the frustration. I spent a lot of time last summer getting my brake pads aligned properly so they didn't squeal. In the end I got it to work with the brakes I had, but it took quite a lot of futzing around to get the angle just right. Some people recommend getting a fork crown mounted cable stop to ...


2

If you're friction shifting go with the Dia Compe. They have a ratcheting mechanism in them originally developed by SunTour to counteract the spring in the derailleur. This gives them a very even feel in both directions - you apply as much pressure to upshift as to downshift. They also look better on older bikes. The Shimano shifters OTOH rely purely on ...


2

Dutch town bikes are the norm in Japan (I live in Japan BTW). Most Japanese Dutch style bikes have a rim brake up front and a drum brake in the rear. Rim brake is for help going down hills and the like. As mountainous as Japan is the cities tend to be flat with hills. Most Japanese ride down hills no problem on a dutch bike. However, most Japanese walk their ...


2

Sheldon Brown has this to say about disadvantages of roller brakes: Disadvantages? [...] Only large Rollerbrakes with large cooling fins have enough heat dissipation for speed control on downgrades -- no Rollerbrake is suitable for use as a drag brake on a cargo bike or tandem. There have been reports of grease's catching on fire during long descents! ...


2

This bike is a poor choice for any touring where you have to carry things (if you're doing a supported tour, you may be able to pass with it). It doesn't have rack+fender mounts and doesn't have particularly tough wheels. Depending on the type of touring you're doing, you should look at some touring bikes like the Surly Long Haul Trucker or Trek 520. ...


2

1) As in Scotland, I would recommend you to look for a second-hand bike (possibly gumtree is a good place to start with, bear in mind that you need to check and make sure the bike is not stolen). The reason is that in the winter, all the salt on the roads will corrode your bike badly.So go cheap, then keep it as winter bike, then upgrade gradually. ...


2

It will work, but you will add considerably more housing and 2-3 more bends in the housing. The additional bends will introduce friction which will affect shifting performance, but it should be usable if the cable and housing are good quality and you avoid damaging the cable during installation.


2

If you get a 3 x 10 STI shifter, the front (Sora) shifter will work fine. For the rear, you're going to need to replace it with a 10 speed Shimano road rear derailleur or a 7-9 speed Shimano rear derailleur due to the change in cable pull (7-9 speed and 10 speed road use the same cable pull in Shimano. 10 speed mountain does something else). Note that the ...


1

Shimano rear derailleurs are mostly interchangeable (except for older Dura Ace) since the 6 speed days. With a few exceptions, you can pair any Shimano rear derailleur with any Shimano shifter. The 9 speed XT rear derailleur will work fine with 10 speed shifters. (Edit: Looks like the Dyna-Sys rear derailleur is probably not compatible, but 9 speed should ...


1

As you said, the first issue with routing the cables that way would probably be the amount of friction placed on the cable due to the angles of the routing. Another possibility is that if you were to route the cables that way, they might become too short and could inhibit the turning capacity of the handlebars.


1

I have pretty similar cycling needs as you. I love to race, but still commute over 250km per week in bad weather, so I needed a durable, sporty bike, on a budget. After doing a LOT of research, I bought a Verenti Defense WR2.1 Sora 2015. Hope this answer helps, I have done over 4000km in 4 months on this bike in terrible weather (Ireland) and have also ...


1

I would suggest a serious conversation with your local bike shop(s). Do your research, identify what you want, and ask them to do a bike fitting and order the correct size for you. The idea is to encourage them to invest in you while you invest in them. They may want a deposit up front. But if you can convince them to get what you want, you have started a ...


1

I also like speed and racing, but after some close calls (nowhere close to yours) I decided to push my limits going UPHILL, go faster in that 17% climb where 10 mph is the speed of light. And outside of bicycles, there are infinite challenges, running a mile under 5 minutes, learning to swim butterfly, or in strength training, going for the gimnastic ...


1

I would try something less expensive first. For me, switching to Kool Stop brake pads has worked even better than toeing in when in resolving this type of vibration. I'm not surprised that replacing the front wheel didn't affect the problem since it's not likely to be the cause of the vibration.


1

Yes, you can use that bike for touring. Probably not "proper loaded touring" which is the most traditional type, but light touring, i.e. sleeping in hotels and not carrying a lot of food or luxury items like a laptop. You have a few options to outfit the bike with a modest amount of cargo capacity: Tubus Fly Classic rear rack with the Tubus QR axle ...


1

The Novara Safari is a bike designed for off road touring. Novara Safari Bike With a load you are not going to be doing real technical stuff. But you should be a be able to handle "improved trails". The biggest tires it will take is the best thing you can do - and practice. The link says it has Alex ATD 470 rims. Those are not high end rims and more of a ...


1

I haven't built a bike trailer but used a B.O.B. Yak for a trip from the UK down through Europe. It was a great trailer and we were able to fit a large 2-man tent in there plus other stuff. We also had front and back panniers. See here: http://www.bobgear.com/bike-trailers/yak I now use a Burley D'Lite with 2 toddlers in it. Even though you could fit ...


1

According to bike rumors, these two bikes have different Cr-Mo tubing, with one being a higher end material. You can find more information here


1

I also have enjoyed riding with a Cannondale Headshok (Silk Tour 700). I agree with you, weight and stiffness are non-issues with HeadShok type suspension, I think they are fantastic for producing a comfortable aluminium tourer but I may be biased! I think that people who have not riden this type of shock don't understand its advantages. When it is locked ...



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