Hot answers tagged

64

Oh... where do I even start? I love dogs, I am crazy about them, too. I have 3 labs of my own. I am from a place where street dogs are very abundant. If you don't see any dogs in the next 100 yards, consider yourself lost! :D I am barked at often, chased often, even confronted sometimes. I used to run away before, because it is what a normal guy does. I ...


35

The distinctions are often subtle: The touring bike will of course be slightly more heavily built (generally a steel frame). The touring bike will have a longer wheelbase. You will generally notice that the space between the seat tube and the rear wheel is fairly wide. (The longer wheelbase serves 3 purposes: More stable, smoother ride, better fender ...


23

It's more or less a math question. A way from Athen to London without using a ferry if not absolutely necessary (Canal), it is approximately 3200 kilometers. So if you have an average speed of 15 km/h (mountainbike) or maybe 25 km/h (racing bicycle) it would take approximately 214 respectively 128 hours to cycle the route. As always for such rough ...


21

Get a printed map and look for the 'postal roads'... There are 'postal roads' in Switzerland that are closed to normal cars. These go over some high passes that are just not wide enough for regular traffic. They are called 'postal roads' because only the post bus goes on them. What is amazing about them is the descents - you can ride 'TdF' style without ...


18

First, congratulations on trying to do this, and doing some research before your try. The bike really doesn't matter very much. You can ride 500 miles carrying enough stuff to be comfortable on just about any bike, a better bike will be faster, more comfortable and more reliable. But I've been on a 3000 mile ride with a couple of people who rode KMart-level ...


16

The Canine Aggression FAQs from the RSPCA has some useful general advice about aggressive dogs. If you encounter an aggressive dog while cycling it recommends the following: If you are cycling, dismount and place the bike between you and the dog. This allows you to slowly wheel it far enough away to remount. Do not try to outpace the dog as this may ...


16

Mountain bikes have been pressed into service as touring machines for a long time. Old hardtail mountain bikes make great, bristly touring machines, and they're fun to ride. Tires The first thing you'll want to look at are the tires. Most mountain bikes come with knobby tires for riding on dirt and gravel. A set of slicks or semi-slick tires will decrease ...


16

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


15

If you are on an unfamiliar route or completely surprised by an encounter with a chasing dog, you basically have two tried and true options: Sprint Hard: You will likely exit the dogs territorial boundary in just a few seconds (though it will feel a lot longer). Once outside their perceived territory they will give up the chase. Dismount: If the animal is ...


14

I bring enough to dress small cuts and stop bleeding, at least until 911 could get to me. If you're riding in areas you might not be able to be reached by emergency services, or if you have particular medical issues that need specialty supplies, a kit like this would insufficient. Bandages/band-aids of a few different sizes Gauze -- usually a small roll ...


14

We can generalize the main areas where one can load weight as such: Front rack vs. Rear Rack High (on top of rack) vs. Low (in panniers) The most commonly accepted points for load distribution are as follows: Keep dense, heavy items low to the ground. The lower you & your bike's center of gravity is, the more easily you can keep yourself upright. ...


14

Doesn't address your question with regard to maps, but I've found it easier to work from turn-by-turn cue sheets instead. I almost always ride a predetermined route, even if it's just something quickly charted up pre ride. Luxury is of course having access to google maps and being able to print out directions. I print out (or write out, sometimes you have to ...


14

By breaking in your Brooks B17 etc. leather saddle, you create the "valleys" in the leather for your sitbones and the crotch area of the pelvis bone. Therefore you need enough time for the leather to deform at these three areas. There is various information on the net. My experience is that about 500km of riding (so about 25h at 20 km/h) gives a good enough ...


14

You should find that on those bikes everything is a bit stronger and heavier than a standard touring bike. Not only are they expected to carry more weight, they're designed to be ridden into places where failures are more difficult to recover from. As well, because they're designed to be ridden off road they'll usually have a lower top tube for better ...


13

180 km is a long way for someone who only normally does 20-30km (to quote @PeterH in chat). To my way of thinking, you could do it, with some pre-conditions Do some longer rides, where you ride 30km to somewhere, have lunch, and ride back. Ride on some of the potential routes, to understand the traffic situation. Plan ahead, so that you do it over two or ...


13

I just used a 5mm bolt with locking nut, and a ~15mm wide washer on the inside when this happened to my Ortleib. If you use stainless steel bolt, nut and washers it won't rust and the pressure against the pannier materials stops it leaking. I'd use the biggest washer you can find on the inside, but the biggest I could find was only 15mm. If you look at the ...


12

This may depend on what you enjoy doing. For me, the very act of exercise will stop me being bored, and cycling wins on so many fronts. But if you need to actively do stuff, how about: focus on the weather, on a good day feel the breeze watch the scenery talk to others in your group (I'm less keen on this, as I like a quiet cycle) give yourself challenges, ...


12

A recovery ride is a ride where you go at a very easy pace for 90-120 minutes. The idea of it is to give all those over-worked muscles some gentle exercise so that they don't tighten up, while flooding them with nutrients to help them repair. For people in training, it's a day off to just enjoy riding. I ride with a friend on his recovery ride because ...


12

There is a lot of complete and utter non-sense around Brooks saddles. When it comes to saddles, everything works for somebody and nothing works for everybody. Rule #1. If it's not reasonably comfortable on Day 1, it will never be comfortable. Saddle comfort is about getting the right shape to match your backside, leather saddles like the Brooks will ...


12

Riding 50 miles (80km) in a day is a fairly modest goal. Doing it three days in a row is only slightly more ambitious. As a fit (as you will be when you do it) person to ride 80km, you could expect to take 3 to 3.5 hours if you rode hard, and 4 hours if you took it easy. The difference is how you will feel the next day. For the actual ride, plan on taking ...


11

Probably what you want is a "hybrid" or "commuter" bike. Flat handlebars (like a mountain bike), smooth road tires (but a bit fatter than on a racing bike), usually the right stuff for mounting a rack and fenders. Go down to your Local Bike Shop and look at what they have. Make sure it's a store that basically just does bicycles, not a department store that ...


11

My preference is for SPD clipless pedals and "walkable" clipless shoes. But I still have a pair of lightweight "tennis shoes" in my gear for campsite, days off, etc. Another option, if you can still find them, is the old-fashioned "touring" shoes and regular toe straps. "Touring" shoes are (or were) quite walkable, and it's reasonable to walk miles in ...


11

As I may have given away in the comments, I'm not a fan of sensory deprivation when you're as vulnerable as you are when you're on a bike. I don't think there are many scenarios where not being able to hear as good as you possibly can is safe on a bike — but you may not agree and safety really isn't the point of this answer. My belief is that when you ...


11

There are a couple of reasons. The KISS Principle If anything vital breaks while you're touring and you can't fix it on the spot, you're stranded. You're too far from home to call your mom for a ride. Unless you have a spare for the broken part, your options are some DIY jerry rigging and/or praying that someone with a truck comes by who will carry you and ...


11

In my experience (week long camping / bike touring trips), I have never thought "Man, I wish I had a chair." I have often thought, "I have packed way too much stuff." There are a few things to consider. You have looked into weight and cost, but there is also space and time considerations. Volume: Do you have space on your rack to put this? How small does ...


11

I'm going to attack this backwards. First of all, camping is the only way you won't have to worry all day about where you're going to sleep. Provided you don't take a route through inhospitable areas, the beauty of planning to camp is in most areas down there, you can pull over, a good distance from the road, and set up camp. It will probably be cold at ...


10

I think that it is generally true that any "all-purpose" tool is less-than-ideal for most purposes. There are trade-offs for everything. If you are just looking for a bike that allows you to ride fast and long while carrying a load, though, I think you are looking for a light touring bike. Get something with drop-bars and road-y geometry. Get a ...



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