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Have you ever changed the back wheel for one with a wider axle? I get a similar effect on my old 15 speed MTB, which was a 5 speed rear. When I fitted a wider wheel with a 7 speed freehub, the dropouts needed spreading by a couple millimetres. I did not parallel the dropouts, so they're very slightly shaped like / \ The upshot is that the Quick ...


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It is possible that you put not enough torque on axle nuts. The axle moves in the fork. If there is enough space, add some extra, broad spacers and then screw it back to the frame. Use this kind of spacer (it's from Sram I-3, might require some drilling)


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No you would either have to use a 2x11 speed drivetrain or a 3x10 speed drive train. You can't pick and choose and any hacks would reduce reliability. Using the 10 speed 30/28 is the same gearing as 34/32 on the 11 speed so no advantage on the change. For remote touring maintenance is as important or more important than gear selection. For long distance ...


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The short answer is yes. As @Criggie notes in his comment, the rear half of your shifting system is working. So there is no need to mess with it. The front derailleur and crank are both Shimano road product, so if you replace both from current 9 speed triple Shimano road product, you're pretty safe. The 9 speed part only matters to maintain chain rings ...


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I'll assume that single bumps aren't the issue (hardtail MTB riders take quite big hits on flat bars), but local fatigue from riding all day on rough surfaces is. I ride flat bars with touring tyres (marathon plus 28), and like to ride trails like these when I get the chance (although my trips are shorter). Definitely padded gloves will help, but the ...


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There are some tricks that I've used to deal with manual discomfort in some longish, 3-4 hour, rides. Resting my hands on the handlebars using somewhere other than the meaty part of my palm and the crook of my thumb. I'd either tuck my pinky and pointer, or ring and middle fingers under, so that the backs of those fingers rest on the bars, or rest on the ...


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There are two things that come to mind. Grips, and gloves. Depending on whether or not you use gloves, they do make some that have gel in the palms that may help reduce vibration some if you're not already using them. Secondly you may try different types of grips, a couple worth mentioning would be the ESI grips. They're essentially made out of silicone ...


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First of all, mountain bike riding is a great thing for a couple to get into. A great entry level bike for around $350 is a Giant Revel. It is considered an entry level bike because it doesn't have disk brakes and only has front suspension, which is all you will need for your kind of riding. I started out with this bike and had no problems with beginner ...



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