New answers tagged

-1

Before taking it in for a tuneup, it'd be worth checking if any spoke nipples have seized up. Then you can spray them with penetrating oil (wd-40 or gt-85 ... ) giving it plenty of time to soak in so that your bike mechanic is able to true the wheel properly. When you get the bike tuned up, see if you can watch the mechanic whilst they do it. That way, you'...


6

Get the bike serviced, giving yourself enough time to thoroughly test it, so that if the service introduces any problems, you discover them long before your trip. There is no standard test for worthiness, you'll have to rely on your judgement.


2

European prices always include VAT, and US prices are typically announced without sales tax (or customs, if you really intend to order from US). Once you add the sales tax, the prices are closer. Generally, you will pay extra for a brand that is commonly not available in Europe. In addition to Surly, Thorn is easily available in Europe from UK and cheaper ...


2

First do a rolling measure while sitting on the bike to get the speedo calibrated to your actual setup. That's your method B Then I suggest also getting a proper map and making sure google's scale is correct. They care about navigation much more than 5% errors on inner-city distances, so it might be that their map is less accurate than a proper ...


3

I point out that your comment of I have (50-559) 26x1.95 tires I should set it to 2089. Doesn't actually match your table, which says: 50-559 (26"x1.9") 2089 mm 54-559 (26"x2.0") 2114 mm So the ETRTO number and the imperial measurement are not quite equal. Could be your circumference is closer to halfway between these, or 2101 mm Downside,...


3

Google maps probably treats roads as not having any width, and corners as point turns. Unlike bends, if you zoom in you tend to see a sharp 90 degree change in line on a curve This will cost you the length of the arc you really take. It certainly omits all the lane changes, obstacle avoidance and similar manoeuvres. However there is some variation in ...


1

For 5 days with couch surfing and a good weather forecast in the summer you don’t need more than arm and leg warmers. Use your smartphone for navigation (using e.g. osmand). A spare tube, pump and the most basic tools never hurt either. Use a saddle bag or frame bags to carry a short and shirt so you have something to wear when you’re not sitting in the ...


2

That carrier is lighweight and puts all the load on your seatpost. I'd be surprised if its rated for 10 kilos, probably as low as 5 kilos. You want to carry stuff on the bike, not on your back so that means a decent carrier/rack that has strong struts down to the rear axle mounts. That plus panniers may be all you need, but it may make the bike rear-heavy....


3

You need to be very careful with the weight limit on that rack, it will flop about if overloaded a little, or break if overloaded too much. But you're riding short distances in heavily populated areas, so presumably you're staying in buildings and buying prepared food, so you don't need to carry much. If you can afford to spend a little extra money on buses ...


1

It's not central Vermont but I can vouch for the routes in this PDF in the Northeast Kingdom. I did a modified version of the "Around the Block" ride and threw in some of the many gravel roads in the region (and across Vermont) that make for superb touring routes.



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