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I ordered 9 speed cassette 12-36 and I'm just going to start with that. My current chain is pretty new, so I'm going to buy 1 piece at a time and see how it fits together. I'm going to do a little tour on it and see how everything feels. If I need to replace a lot of things, I should consider a new bike, but I love my bike and I'm definitely on a budget. ...


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So you currently have 9sp, and you want to go to 6800, which is 11sp? Most likely Shimano would advise you that what you need to do is to buy the entire groupset. In reality, you could probably get away without replacing brakes and bottom bracket, although you'd probably find it cheaper to buy the set, rather than to buy the individual bits and bobs. As ...


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Shimano 11 speed road cassettes are wider than previous models, so you most likely will need a wider freehub body. In some cases it can be bought separately, but given that you have 9 speed at the moment, I find it unlikely, so add an 11 speed Shimano road rear compatible hub to the purchase list.


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See Klaster_1's comment. You could save a lot of cash by going for a 9 speed cassette with a larger large. Something like a 32 or 34 tooth will be available standard. Your rear deraileruer might be okay, and a new chain might be a good idea if the current one is worn. However you could get away with just the cassette. The other option is to put a triple ...


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Does this frame have mounting points down on the rear dropouts? The sort sometimes used for mudguards/fenders, which can be repurposed for the downshafts of a rack. Since they hold most of the weight, a front mount is relatively lightly loaded. I made a couple of clamps out of thin sheet metal for my rack, which wrap around the seat stays and bolt ...


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I've finally found what I'm looking for, both of which are manufactured by Ground Effect. There are two models which I'm considering, either the Tardis or Body Bag. Thanks for all the suggestions! Right now I'm leaning towards the Tardis but both fold down in to A4 sized packages which is exactly what I'm looking for.


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Check your airline's policy on how bikes should be packaged, but I've managed to fly with British Airways Budapest-London using a giant polythene bag, which I just wheeled in and taped up as the front quick release had jammed. The bag itself was small enough to fit in the bottom of a pannier when folded, and doubled as a groundsheet for camping CTC ...


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This is a service recommendation and is not going to help our American readers, but... airshells.com rents bike transport cases on many European airports, including Dublin. So, you ride to the airport, pick up the case there and check it in. At destination, leave it at left luggage office - which costs some money but saves a lot of hassle. I rented a case ...


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You could pair a Burly Travoy with a bike suitcase if you're willing to put up with a trailer while you're touring: + The bonus is that you get to use the bike suitcase to hold all your belongings in a nice, watertight compartment while on the road. The downside is that it looks wonky. I'm not sure if the Travoy is designed for hundreds of miles of ...



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