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0

I'm just going to ignore fancy apps, gps, and physics all together: Figure out how many calories you consume on a typical/non-exercise day and multiply that by the days in your bike tour. Subtract that from the amount of calories you consumed during the tour, and that will be a pretty good estimate of how many calories the actual biking required.


0

If you're able to upload the ride to Garmin Connect, or Strava, you can get an estimate of calorie burn on the basis of speed, elevation, and so forth. If you were wearing a heart rate monitor, the estimate from Garmin will be much more accurate, but unfortunately at this time Strava does not factor heart rate into their calorie estimate.


2

To be honest, you're really asking this question too late. If you had asked before your tour, I believe the easiest way you could have measured it would be to find a cycling app which takes your weight and your other physical information. Then you simply weigh your fully loaded bike and add that weight to your own, then the app would measure your total ...


2

You can't. Calories burnt depends on your speed, elevation change, and your body composition. e.g. riding at 30mph burns more than double the calories per hour than 20mph. The calorie calculators just make a rough approximation, and their margin of error is significantly greater than the difference between their assumed bike weight and yours. Just take ...


3

Start with short distances and gradually increase. Then when the family is into the routine of bike trips, add a picnic stop. Then find a nice camping location, either near home or near where you park the car, and ride by a longer route to get there. This way if something unplanned happens you are not far away. Make sure the kid(s) have fun. Perhaps ...


5

I think you have the right idea - build up slowly. I've seen a few people with little kids out cycle touring, and did a couple of weeks with a group that included a mother and pre-walking infant. The people below apparently managed at least 1000km based on Moz's comments. I think the main limit is how long your kids can handle being on the bike or in the ...


2

Pursuing this might not be totally impossible, but you should probably have a sit down and really contemplate the effort you will need to put into this. For starters, depending on the age of your child, you're going to need diapers, clothes, food, entertainment, a decent sized trailer, all of your regular touring gear, and extra emergency equipment such as ...


2

A company called Pacsafe makes a steel mesh web/net that fits around a backpack and can be used to lock it down. You might find a shape that works for your stuff. It's more of a deterrent than a guarantee but it's a worthy solution. Here is a link with a good picture. http://m.rei.com/product/709207/pacsafe-55-security-web-small


3

I doubt you will find any way of making the bike secure enough to leave alone for hours on end. Perhaps you could somehow fit solid motorbike panniers, but they would be awfully heavy and inconvenient when you do have to remove them. When buying groceries you basically have the choice of taking the bags with you or leaving them on the bike. What I do ...


5

I use two different strategies for the short and long absences. visiting a city by foot When I'll be away from the bike for a long time I take the valuable stuff (cash, id, small tool kit, phone, charger, camera) and leave everything else. If I'm in a formal camping area or in a secluded location I'll leave the tent pitched and my sleeping bag and ...



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