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1

You're not typically carrying heavy loads while randonneuring, any quality, road hub should work. I think an MTB hub is overkill. I've used American Classic hubs for MTB race wheels, but I probably would not choose American Classic for randonneuring. I have thousands of brevet and randonnee miles on Shimano Ultegra, Cycle Ops Power Tap, and Schmidt SON hubs, ...


1

I randonneur extensively (on a touringy Kona Jake with a saddlebag) and have found Novatec hubs with sealed industrial bearing to be very cost effective, offering tens of thousands of kilometers with virtually no maintenance and no degradation of performance to speak of.


2

super-reliable not too heavy low maintenance not super expensive Any Shimano XT hub M76X - M77X. Also confider the newer T7XX "touring XT" models. Shimano hubs are exclusively (afaik) loose-bearing rather than cartridge hubs, so they're easily serviceable and the balls are available almost everywhere. The XT range should also have decent seals, durable ...


2

Here is another take on "bulk". At the time I completed the tour this photo was taken on I was using a home made quilt as my sleeping "bag". The quilt is the item in the blue/gray Sea to Summit dry bag sitting on top of the Extrawheel Voyager trailer. Now the quilt is not that heavy but it is clearly quite bulky taking up a lot of space, so much space that ...


7

'Bulk' is mostly about whether all of your luggage will fit in your bags. ie is the volume of your luggage less than the capacity of your bags. So it depends on how much stuff you want to take, and how big your panniers are. Aerodynamics doesn't really matter for touring. Unless you are cycling rather fast, or it is very windy. Usually the weight of your ...


9

In my experience (week long camping / bike touring trips), I have never thought "Man, I wish I had a chair." I have often thought, "I have packed way too much stuff." There are a few things to consider. You have looked into weight and cost, but there is also space and time considerations. Volume: Do you have space on your rack to put this? How small does ...


1

If you're going on road, a hybrid should be fine (like the Aero RS2) - the gearing and tire size and handling should be reasonable provided you don't go too high on the weight. I'd probably not load it too much though (for that you want something intended for touring). At 30 kg of stuff though, I think I'd look for something more touring bike-y than the Aero ...


1

I researched more on this topic. The short answer is that an aluminium frame can last from a couple of years to 50 years/lifetime. The long answer is: The main factor is fatigue (not counting accidents): "The tendency of a material (metal) to break under repeated cyclic loading at a stress considerably less then the tensile strength in a static test." ...


3

Expedition bikes You will see "expedition" bike at manufacturers who are specialized in touring bikes, and have many models. The marketing department needs to differentiate somehow, so the common groups are called trekking, touring, expedition. But this can vary, and for me the expedition is usually the top bike in their offering, with the most expensive ...


11

There are a lot of question so I will settle on the one in the title. How many years will an current aluminum frame last of a touring bike? Depends: Don't know what aluminum frame Construction is a larger factor than material Don't know the use Use is a larger factor than material Don't know how you are going to care for the bike Care/maintenance is ...


0

Points to consider: A touring specific general bike is probably better, vs. the custom frame of a generalist shop. Geometry, strength, details (braze ons, eyelets, racks, etc.). If it is a not from a touring expert, your bike can be actually worse for touring vs. a touring expert's general bike. Is it a custom sized frame of an otherwise stock bike, or is ...


0

But expedition bikes are not limited 26". Salsa makes two: Vaya Fargo I see no advantage to a 26" wheel 700 / 29 is more efficient (both 622 iso) 29 off roads better than 26 They are making very strong 700 / 29 now. Downhill bikes use 29. With disc brake my experience is better wheel availability than 26". My experience is a more availability of 700 ...


11

You should find that on those bikes everything is a bit stronger and heavier than a standard touring bike. Not only are they expected to carry more weight, they're designed to be ridden into places where failures are more difficult to recover from. As well, because they're designed to be ridden off road they'll usually have a lower top tube for better ...


6

Short and simple... Nobody with the cash to spend on a high end touring bike thinks they are worthwhile. Given the increasing specialization in the bike market, they only reason they don't exist is nobody will buy them.


6

Mid range touring bikes come with shocks because because mid range consumers will buy them. Department store bikes come with full suspension because people buy them. High end touring bikes don't come with shocks because high end consumers don't see the value. A bicycle does not need to be used for how it is classified/designed. I use a cyclocross with ...


8

There are a couple of reasons. The KISS Principle If anything vital breaks while you're touring and you can't fix it on the spot, you're stranded. You're too far from home to call your mom for a ride. Unless you have a spare for the broken part, your options are some DIY jerry rigging and/or praying that someone with a truck comes by who will carry you and ...


4

My suspicion is that they add to the cost and most tourists prefer to spend that money on something else. The touring market is also small enough that it's unlikely any manufacturer makes a touring-specific suspension fork. But as you've found, front suspension bikes are still available. At the high end you're probably going to be better off getting a custom ...


2

Great article about the pros and cons. The writer chose a 28" (700c) bike for single bike, and 26" for the tandem bike. 700c vs 26inch Wheel Size for Touring


0

When I upgraded the brakes on my Surly Long Haul Trucker in preperatio for what was planned to be a 5,000 km tour which turned into a 3,000 km tour I fitted Koolstop Tectonic v-brake shoes. Koolstop describe them as .. come[ing] with a multi friction compound set up, but single or dual compounds can also be configured. I have found them to work ...


0

Yes but there are questions often raised about the handling effects and the way they are mounted. My understanding is that the approach taken with the Tubus Swing which I have is considered less optimal than the approach adopted by Old Man Mountain illustrated above. That said I have a Tubus Swing rack on my Giant XTC 2 and have found that it works well, ...


2

Racks specific for front suspension are not so common and there are questions often raised about the handling effects. Personally I have a Tubus Swing rack on my Giant XTC 2 and have found that works well, but then I am not a technical off road rider :). On the downside I believe that Tubus have stopped making the Swing so it may be harder to find. That ...


2

I tourer on a Surly Long Haul Trucker and I wouldn't consider a 30-34 "a pretty low gear", not when climbing hills on a loaded bike. My bike which has done a lot of touring including outback touring when the load is pretty big (trailer + six panniers = 35 litres of water, 20 days of food) is configured with a Shimano Deore XT CS-M770 11-34 rear cluster and ...


1

Saddle width depends on: sitbone width, and riding position. Usually touring is done in a more upright position, which requires a wider saddle vs. the same person in a sporty position. The hole in the middle is for your crotch. If that bone hits hard plastic/metal, it hurts a lot, and you cannot ride more. The B66 is a good choice for touring, probably it ...


1

How: The low tech way: Measuring tape Simply take it with you and measure five bikes that are comfy, and five that are not. Digital camera Ask someone take a picture of you sitting on the bike, then review the picture to analyse yourself the sitting positions, both those that feel comfortable, and those that feel uncomfortable. Geometry: Chainstay. ...


6

By breaking in your Brooks B17 etc. leather saddle, you create the "valleys" in the leather for your sitbones and the crotch area of the pelvis bone. Therefore you need enough time for the leather to deform at these three areas. There is various information on the net. My experience is that about 500km of riding (so about 25h at 20 km/h) gives a good enough ...


4

This ships with a Tiagra SS. Derailleurs come in 3 lengths: SS (narrow range) , GS (medium range), SGS (wide range). If you want to move past 30t, you need to switch to a SGS derailleur, likely from the Shimano mountain range (e.g. Deore M591) - its 9 speed so the cable pulls are the same between the 9 speed deore and 9 speed Tiagra. This is what I'd ...


8

There is a lot of complete and utter non-sense around Brooks saddles. When it comes to saddles, everything works for somebody and nothing works for everybody. Rule #1. If it's not reasonably comfortable on Day 1, it will never be comfortable. Saddle comfort is about getting the right shape to match your backside, leather saddles like the Brooks will ...



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