Hot answers tagged

71

I found this article which has some statistics on accidents involving wrong-way cycling: Table 4 shows that all categories of bicyclists traveling against the direction of traffic flow are at greatly increased risk for accidents—on average 3.6 times the risk of those traveling with traffic, and as high as 6.6 times for those 17 and under. This result ...


70

After 50+ years as a cyclist, this is my approach - ride according to the conditions ride in reasonable proximity to the curb if safe, move over a little as traffic approaches know where I'm going, and do it assertively if somebody honks / shouts / waves, assume that they must be a friend, or are telling me something important, so smile broadly and wave ...


67

For one thing, if you cycle with traffic the closing speed between car and bike is the DIFFERENCE in speed between the two. If you're doing 20mph and the car is doing 45, the closing speed is 25. Reverse it and the closing speed is 65 -- over twice as fast. This affects the time the driver has to react to the cyclist's presence -- over twice as much time ...


41

As cyclists, we are vulnerable to any collision. A collision with a truck, bus, car, bicycle, pram, skateboard, rollerblader, pedestrian, dog, or even a domestic cat, will almost always cause a problem, if not an injury. Vehicle drivers are just people like us, except that they are in a comfortable safe box, maybe with crying kids in the back, and a have ...


38

The obvious few things are: Front light Red rear tail light Spare batteries for said lights Spoke lights/reflectors for improved side visibility Bright clothing, ideally cycling clothing with reflective strips on them.


29

AGAINST One of my primary issues with bike lanes is that motorists tend to think that you have to stay in that lane. So when you have to move right because of debris, garbage cans or parked cars in the lane it further annoys ill-informed drivers. Additionally, drivers come to expect you to be out of traffic, riding on the shoulder, and will squeeze by you ...


28

There's a fake Buddha quote on some internet sites which says, "Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die." The most popular of the genuine Buddha quotes (the Dhammapada) begins with, "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred. "He abused me,...


27

In most states it's the law that if the signal is malfunctioning you can proceed through "with caution" against the signal. Forester and others have argued that if a signal does not appropriately recognize the presence of a bike it's "malfunctioning" and you're on reasonably firm legal ground to invoke the "malfunctioning signal" provision. (However, I've ...


26

Before posting this list, I need to preface it with my position that riding in a predictable manner, as much like a 'vehicle' as possible is safest to me. To a large degree I disagree with treating bicycles differently because: It confuses interaction with motorists, especially at intersections where the risk is highest for cyclists. Not all motorists or ...


25

Well, regarding the question asked: "why is it safer etc." let's go: (already mentioned) The closing speed between a car coming from behind is much slower. He has more time to see you before overtaking, and if you need to cross, you can signal your turn, so he can slow down for you to pass; By the same reasons, you can flow with traffic, take the lane, ...


25

When it comes to stop signs, I live by some simple rules: If it's a multi-way stop and there's another car waiting or just arriving, I stop. If I can't clearly see or judge what I'm riding into, I stop. If it doesn't feel right for some reason, I stop. If there's a cop there (or a history of cops), I stop. I don't necessarily clip out and put my foot ...


24

Get a Bright Bike kit from brightthread.com: Bright Bike DIY kits cover your bicycle in easy-to-apply design-savvy ultra reflective vinyl for safety. It is like covering your bike with a big stickers that turn ultra-bright in headlights. The retroreflective vinyl is the same material used on the backs of running shoes, but with colors. The kits greatly ...


24

As you're in Ontario the following references are official. Look at the picture at the bottom right of Toronto's Understanding Bicycle Lanes -- here's an excerpt: In summary, stop behind or pass to the left of the turning car. I generally expect drivers to see what's happening out the front of the cars, but never expect them to know what's happening to ...


23

The key thing, is that you never want to be to the right of cars that are turning right. Depending on the exact lane setup and traffic amounts, I would do one of these: Merge left into the go-straight (left) lane, so that anybody turning right is in a separate lane to the right of me. Be in the center or left third of the right-turn lane, so that anybody ...


22

A lot of cyclists promote vehicular cycling in which you act just like a car, obeying all of the rules of the road. This includes respecting all stop signs & lights, travelling in the same direction on the same side of the road as motorized traffic, and using the full lane (taking the lane), often ignoring marked bike lanes if they are too small or ...


22

I should imagine you should be looking for some reflective gloves. Or even some glo gloves Check these out as an example ... http://lifehacker.com/395978/glo-gloves-reflective-cycling-gear Also using a good reflective jacket that has good reflective strips down the arms is useful.


22

The Highway Code comes in handy with this question... In London drivers of all buses are exceptionally well trained and likely to be highly experienced. They know every part of their route and have 'dealt with' plenty of cyclists before. They will always indicate when they are pulling over and indicate again when they are going to pull out. It is highly ...


22

b) is most correct, except that you don't need anyone else by your side. Taking the lane is riding pretty much right in the middle of the lane, and asserting control of the entire lane. Riding in the middle makes it obvious to motorists that they'll have to change lanes, or wait for a safe opportunity, in order to pass you.


22

There are tips here: Car Bike Collisions I especially like the first tip: Also there are tips about riding in traffic on pages 13 through 30 of this document: Cycling Skills Ontario’s Guide to Safe Cycling It's all good, including the pages about trucks and buses. Also the (Ontario-specific) law about riding on the right is interesting: HTA 147 - ...


22

Once the other car is in front of you generally the law and the legal system both suggest you need to give way to the car. In some places motorists technically need to give way to cyclists in the same lane or a bike lane, but that's something that the court will decide after the fact. It's IMO rude for a motorist to overtake you then turn, but it's going to ...


22

The key point here is that 90% of drivers immediately forget about any vehicle they've passed, unless it has bright flashing lights. The diagram you have added shows that you're behind, and in the driver's blind spot. Attempting pass on the inside is now to attempt suicide. The only time it's reasonably safe to pass on the inside is when the traffic is ...


21

Try making up a different backstory for the driver. You are already making one up, you know: speeds off to annoy the next bicyclist I do very well with assuming that the driver must have an unhappy marriage, or be on their way to a job they hate, or otherwise be preoccupied with their own misery, which impairs the way they drive. If they beep or say ...


20

Seems to me that your best option is choice 2: Signal to the left in advance of running out of the lane, check for a reasonable gap in the cars while still moving, and merge into that gap once you've determined that it's safe. In that option you are essentially behaving like exactly what you are - a slow moving vehicle. Your behavior is like what you would ...


20

I'd go for the air-horn, for example the AirZound. It is my opinion that screaming and yelling (the primal scream) can cause a lot of unnecessary social distress, and is not a good alterntive for traffic communication and signalling under normal conditions. It ends up being more effective when you're in "panic" as said, which is barely a day-by-day ...


19

Anecdotal evidence I have heard is that in a lot of cases complaints actually do have an effect, particularly if the company is a large one. All complaints have to be followed up and while you may not hear back from the company, management does speak to the drivers involved. Whether this has a positive effect or just creates resentment with the driver, I ...


18

Is it legal? That depends on the country's traffic laws and on the exact layout of the intersection. The traffic laws that I am familiar with (Denmark, Austria) indicate that the bicyclist you describe was wrong to overtake a right-turning car on the car's right side. If there is a bike lane that extends through the intersection, then AFAIK the cyclist ...


17

Screaming is faster and much more effective: I suspect it's usually best. Or use an electric horn or air horn. About screaming: The BHSI writes as follows. We don't find that horns do much for safety on a bicycle. Your voice is faster to react and adapts better to different situations. The primal scream produces good adrenalin-based reactions in ...


16

In theory great except for: Painted white line on side of road - great except for everybody turning right across them at each junction, cars parked in them, busses pulling in and out of them, grit+broken glass+leafs+litter swept into them, broken drain covers, or are so narrow you can't fit a bike in them. Separated bike lanes - either take you miles out ...


15

This answer is community wiki - please feel free to modify To give it a good start here are some main points that I normally follow: never take turns on the inside beside a turning car, and definitely not along a bus or truck - I believe that is the main cause of fatal accidents involving cyclists - long vehicles cut the corners when turning and you may ...


15

I took a pretty quick look at the map, but I'm going to make a kind of general suggestion: If this is a trip that you're only used to traveling by motor vehicle, you might fall into the trap of thinking that the route you're used to is the only route available. Bikes can go lots of places that cars can't, and lots of places that cars just as frequently don't....



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