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48

After 50+ years as a cyclist, this is my approach - ride according to the conditions ride in reasonable proximity to the curb if safe, move over a little as traffic approaches know where I'm going, and do it assertively if somebody honks / shouts / waves, assume that they must be a friend, or are telling me something important, so smile broadly and wave ...


24

There's a fake Buddha quote on some internet sites which says, "Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die." The most popular of the genuine Buddha quotes (the Dhammapada) begins with, "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred. "He abused ...


20

Try making up a different backstory for the driver. You are already making one up, you know: speeds off to annoy the next bicyclist I do very well with assuming that the driver must have an unhappy marriage, or be on their way to a job they hate, or otherwise be preoccupied with their own misery, which impairs the way they drive. If they beep or say ...


8

The best revenge is riding your bike. Remember, they're stuck in a car, probably dealing with stop and go traffic, other jerk drivers and literally burning money from their gas tanks. You're on a bike, getting fresh air and exercise, probably making better time than the drivers, and definitely having a better time. Enjoy your self.


7

The hard and fast rule is to do whatever it takes to keeps you safe. The first thing is to ride with lights at night and reflective gear. Generally, what I do is, if theres a wide enough shoulder I will use it. If there isn't, I take the lane. Being in a corner of a lane is a problem since motorists will try to sneak past and can't always judge the room ...


5

This may sound simplistic. It's probably something you already do, and you can develop it further with practice and awareness. Acknowledge your feelings: "That interaction was very painful. I didn't like that at all." Then gently let them go: "Everything is OK. I am safe, and life keeps on going. This is great weather. When I get home, I'm going to listen ...


4

There's really not much you can do to prevent the onset of such feelings. It is your visceral response. I also think that if you're riding hard, there may be some biochemistry involved that makes angry emotions more pronounced. Just accept a certain amount of anger. There's nothing you can do about it in the brief moments during and after the incident. ...


4

I might be a dissenting voice on this site, as I more often drive than ride my bike on the road, but consider that it might be you being inconsiderate, if you pardon the pun. May be it's you hogging a lane or dashing to the right of a driver trying to make a right turn -- one cannot tell from your question. I also ride a motorcycle once in a while, and the ...


3

In my youth I entertained some militant bicyclist thoughts, so let me share a few stories. (Notre Dame, Indiana) I was riding my bike home from the department. A car full of high-schoolers (or may be freshmen?) approached from behind. The dudes on the back seat came up with the bright idea of poking me with a baseball bat. They barely made contact, and I ...


3

I find that more often than not, when I get mad at drivers, it is very often a reflection of my own mood. If I'm in a good mood, bad driving just washes over me. On the rare occasions I am in a bad mood for some reason, the slightest inconsideration by a driver gets me seething. The best response to bad, inconsiderate driving is to ignore it. (But I ...


3

Instead of getting mad at them remember that the people who honk or drive too close are need more education on how to drive on a complete street. It is our job as cyclists to do our best to follow the road rules. If you are doing that you can be confident that it is not your fault if you get honked at. Rather it is their ignorance of safe driving that is the ...


2

First and foremost would be to not take it personally, there are a lot of drivers that just think cyclists shouldn't be using the roads at all so no amount of good cycling will help that. That will help mitigate, but doesn't help you to get over the anger... To do that you either need to take a quick break to compose yourself or hope that a set of traffic ...


2

See them as human, with, alas, human limitations. People react first based on reflex including fight-or-flight, then based on their beliefs, their mood, recent experiences and experiences earlier in their history. Then after a while - if they are calm - they may start noticing the present. It's not about you. It's about their history. Driving ...


2

Traffic varies a lot between countries - my guess is that it quite a different thing in India than in Denmark. During the last 20 years many Danish cities have been completely re-designed to better accommodate the many bikes - often by reducing the number or width of the car lanes to make room for dedicated bike lanes. And for a city like Copenhagen, it has ...


1

I used to commute 14 kilometers one way, which makes up 28 both ways to work every day. Needed to get used at first but it did not take much time. A bicycle moves 22 km/h in average in a tight traffic with lights, +-3 km/h if you are lucky or not, which makes some 40 minutes for the whole trip - not a big deal, really. I did not ride in rain and when it is ...


1

My commute is exactly the same:18km one way. I have an electric motor 350w that helps a lot, on normal days no shower needed in the morning. I tried all possible side roads until I found a nicer route, even if that is 5km more, I prefer the safer and quieter way.


1

It's all relative. I ride 8 km each way to work, and I ride all year in the wet and rainy Pacific Northwest of Washington State. There is a guy at work who rides about 22 km each way, and he too rides all year. My route puts me in traffic most of the way, but Washington State is regarded as the most bike friendly state in the U.S. On your question of ...


1

Just get over it. Ignore it. Most importantly be careful and try and stay out of the way. After all, cars (while most will try and avoid you) are definitely heavier than bicycles. I live in an area that's heavy with bicycles and some (very small percentage) do blow right through the red lights and stop signs, almost hitting me and my little girl on many ...


1

There are few better ways to make a person who is angry, even angrier, than to engage in polite behavior. Kill 'em with kindness, as I learned years ago working Tech Support. While I've not yet had the chance to employ it, my plan is to smile, wave, and call out, "Love you! Mean it!" Just ensure that if they go into cardiac arrest, you are not struck by ...



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