Hot answers tagged

25

When it comes to stop signs, I live by some simple rules: If it's a multi-way stop and there's another car waiting or just arriving, I stop. If I can't clearly see or judge what I'm riding into, I stop. If it doesn't feel right for some reason, I stop. If there's a cop there (or a history of cops), I stop. I don't necessarily clip out and put my foot ...


23

As you're in Ontario the following references are official. Look at the picture at the bottom right of Toronto's Understanding Bicycle Lanes -- here's an excerpt: In summary, stop behind or pass to the left of the turning car. I generally expect drivers to see what's happening out the front of the cars, but never expect them to know what's happening to ...


22

Once the other car is in front of you generally the law and the legal system both suggest you need to give way to the car. In some places motorists technically need to give way to cyclists in the same lane or a bike lane, but that's something that the court will decide after the fact. It's IMO rude for a motorist to overtake you then turn, but it's going to ...


21

The key point here is that 90% of drivers immediately forget about any vehicle they've passed, unless it has bright flashing lights. The diagram you have added shows that you're behind, and in the driver's blind spot. Attempting pass on the inside is now to attempt suicide. The only time it's reasonably safe to pass on the inside is when the traffic is ...


15

I'm not sure why you think it puts you in danger. My rule of thumb is that I will only do the Idaho stop when I can see all the roads at an intersection far enough to know that a car won't show up before I get through the intersection and I can't see any cars. I've been riding in the East Bay for 15+ years and I've never felt like my stopping at stop ...


8

Stop. Or at least slow down a lot, so that you look like you're taking care. Such signs are not really cyclist friendly. But if you don't take any notice of them then it reinforces the negative view many of the motor vehicle drivers have of us. Also, police officers generally have some discretion. It's only if they're bored or what you do is particularly ...


7

I run The Bike Light Database (which started from a series of blog posts on this very Stack Exchange site). The Cygolite Hotshot and the NiteRider Solas are actually two of my top recommended lights, and I specifically recommend a setup similar to what you're describing. From the recommended taillights page: Putting the Cygolite Hotshot on your rack ...


6

For the UK there are traffic statistics available. This graph from the 2015 Road Traffic Estimates shows the general trend for cars. There are detailed tables of traffic flow available. There is also geographical data available in the form an interactive map. This isn't broken down by time of day, but should give you an indication of which roads ...


6

Many or most other cyclists don't stop: but, other cyclists can get into 'accidents'. One advice, if there's a car or bike behind me then I use a hand signal (in lieu of a brake light) to indicate that I am about to slow to a stop. Unusually once on my commuting route (in Toronto), there was some bicycle police (who were giving traffic tickets to any ...


5

In many cities, doing a 35 km (22 mi) commute will take you through parts of the city with different socioeconomic levels and different driver behaviors. Cyclist behavior that works well in one part of the city can lead to road rage in another place. It's valuable to recognize this and adapt your approach at different parts of your commute. Some years ago, ...


5

this is a question I've given a great deal of thought and experimentation to, after an accidental discovery some years ago. Long story short: cycle where the kerb-side wheel of a car or truck would be, and magically, Jedi-mind-trickily, almost ALL drivers give you plenty of room when passing, wait patiently to pass, and are not in the slightest bit annoyed. ...


5

It called a track stand. It originates in track racing on a velodrome, where in the opening stages of the individual sprint event you sometimes need to come to an almost complete halt. Tricky and dangerous to do if not well practiced, it can end in a 'sprawl of shame' if your technique is not perfect.


4

My advice is, first and foremost, avoid hitting the car. Argue about who had right of way later. Irrespective of whatever the law says in your country, the collision will be decidedly more unpleasant for the cyclist that the driver. In Holland, if a driver hits a cyclist whilst turning right, the driver is liable; end of discussion. However, the law varies ...


4

If you don't want to break the law... stop. If you want people driving cars and trucks to respect you... stop. If you don't want to risk a minor mistake of attention getting a cyclist killed... stop. If you are riding your bicycle to get exercise... stop. Just because you are pedaling your ass somewhere does not give you the right to run stop signs. Just ...


4

Yes - visibility is everything for both the rider and the surrounding things. Here's an example of a road bike in traffic. The effect is exaggerated because camera is on handlebars, but even at head height I didn't see her till the camera did. You can see my body position by the shadow on the left side. Its New Zealand ...


4

Being seen - the higher you are, the more likely you will be seen over a roof top. Clearly some cars are too high or too low for it to make a difference, but the odd car is at a height the difference might be significant. Seeing - in an aero position, its harder to see as much as in an upright. It can be done by actively looking around, but its harder - ...


4

After reading that blog post and some forum threads about this issue, the cause seems pretty obvious to me. At the time, the local traffic light crew had 4-light groups on hand, and didn't have 3-light groups. This 4-light group was probably originally designed for car traffic, with one of the lights being a turn light. If having an extra red was an ...


4

The technique you're probably thinking of is doing a "track stand".


4

Coming back 6 months after I posted this question, I'm happy to report that there has been an enormous reduction in hazardous driver behaviour, and it all changed the day I installed a 20W LED headlight. It was $10 on ebay. Best insurance ever, every rider should have one. Previously I was using a USB rechargeable strap on one (moon mask) - but it just doesn'...


3

1. Motion (not intention) Watch intensely the motion of a suspect vehicle, and consider it over anything else you think it's driver might do. When I see a vehicle threatening to cross my path, where time permits I'll seek to make eye-contact with the driver as outlined below, but penultimately the only thing to trust is it's actual movement... The front ...


2

If the car legitimately overtakes you and sometime afterwards hangs a right, leaving you reasonable braking distance, then you slow down. Simple. The car should not overtake you and immediately hang a right, cutting you up. That would be as bad a move against a cyclist as against another driver. If the result of that is you damaging their paintwork, they ...


2

Keeping cars off a bike path is easily done with bollards. Good solid posts 1-1.5m apart will completely block cars, and the middle one can be a removable, lockable version to allow service vehicle access. Alternatively a gate can be provided next to the bike gap. This also permits horse riders. Where the primary concern is horse riders but bikes are ...


2

US rider so these may not apply to everyone. First know your local laws. There are some state laws and many city or county laws. Know them and know what to expect. Some of these suggestions may not work for you in your area. Wear visable clothing. This usually doesn't need to include "parking cone orange" but, stay away from "urban camo" as well. Normal,...


2

Do you live in a region with efficient and non-corrupt police? Then it might be useful to get advice from them, and report the incidents to them. The police can sometimes act even if there has not been an actual collision. From your description, it seems that you think that driver behaviour is the problem, not your own skills. You should of course check if ...


1

I appreciate the attitude towards the people driving around in a climate killing, lansdscape scarring murderweapon you display just in your subject but my first suggestion would be to soften your stance a bit, and take the opposing point of view. These people are likely not out to kill you. They are just not used to small, climatefriendly fitnessmachines on ...


1

Since buying a camera i have experienced very few instances of road rage. As soon as a driver starts with the anger i just point to the camera and ask them to smile for youtube. you can get decent helmet cams for arounf 30 quid if you look around.


1

I wear cheap white cotton gardening gloves on my hands, while biking - they started white and are now a light grey from oil and exhaust fumes. Only cost $2 at the local hardware store. The other thing is to look for full arm length high-vis jackets or overvests with reflective piping on the arm. Orange is considered better than grellow for night-time ...


1

While we do not have Idaho Rules here in Washington, there has been a push for it at times. A "dead red" law took effect for cyclists earlier this year, but that's a far cry from Idaho Rules.



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