Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

The key thing, is that you never want to be to the right of cars that are turning right. Depending on the exact lane setup and traffic amounts, I would do one of these: Merge left into the go-straight (left) lane, so that anybody turning right is in a separate lane to the right of me. Be in the center or left third of the right-turn lane, so that anybody ...


19

b) is most correct, except that you don't need anyone else by your side. Taking the lane is riding pretty much right in the middle of the lane, and asserting control of the entire lane. Riding in the middle makes it obvious to motorists that they'll have to change lanes, or wait for a safe opportunity, in order to pass you.


11

These are the options I use depending on the circumstances: Trackstand: Requires a lot of practice and it is a bit of a swhowoff. (This is the one I use the less) Partially Dismount: Preferred when riding cleated pedals. Dominant foot stays on the pedal, and the pedal is kept ready for a full stroke (at 45 degrees over the horizontal as the other answer ...


10

This is not strictly a bicycling issue. Do-gooders who ignore the rules and want to give the right of way all the time are also irritating to other drivers. They are not necessarily safer drivers, because "scared" is not exactly the same thing as "safe". There isn't anything you can do; just take cautious advantage of the right of way and keep going. The ...


10

At any intersection that has marked turn lanes, I position myself inside the outermost turn lane, inside the line enough that I can't be squeezed between a turning car and one going straight. I then proceed through the intersection on a slightly wider path than the car will take so as not to impeded traffic any more than possible, and head for the bike ...


9

The Wikipedia entry for Iliotibial band syndrome suggests that some of possible causes may be Inadequate warm-up or cool-down Excessive up-hill and down-hill running Positioning the feet "toed-in" to an excessive angle when cycling This IT Band Pain Stretches, Treatment And Prevention article suggests "Having a properly fitted bike can help triathletes ...


8

Yep, I'll agree. To "claim your lane" you ride roughly in the middle of the lane, though precisely where depends on the situation. Eg, if you're in a right-hand turn lane, "claiming your lane" is best accomplished by riding near the left-hand edge of the lane. And vice-versa when in a left-hand turn lane. The idea is to not give the motorist any ...


7

If your commute is as up and down / stop and go as you say then I would suspect your knee problems are similar to mine. I've found through practice, and a few quick minute of research just now, that keeping your cadence (crank rotations per minute) high will help you keep from straining your knees on your ride; especially where you are making many stops, and ...


5

I'd ride in the road before riding on the sidewalk just for the reasons you mentioned -- cars pulling out of driveways, pedestrians, etc. Note that sidewalk laws for bikes are generally up to local towns, so while one town may allow bikes on sidewalks, the next town may not. I'm not sure what you mean about not wanting to be on the far right side by the ...


5

I'm assuming here that, from left to right, S Mathilda Ave has a "right-turn" lane (Lane 1), three "straight on" lanes (Lanes 2, 3 and 4), then two "left turn" lanes (Lanes 5 and 6). (The white car second-from-right appears to be obscuring a left turn arrow painted on the road, correct?) This being the case, my ideal position there would be sitting on that ...


5

The situation you describe is critical, but when conditions allow, I would suggest you a technique I developed exactely for that. The secret is to "ride the wall" as you were in the tilted section of a velodrome, that is, making a curve with your bike. Most falls I have seen or heard, or even almost had myself, are caused by making a curve to the left ...


4

References - Effective Traffic Riding (British Cycling), Cyclecraft There are two cycling positions - primary position ("taking the lane") and secondary position. These positions are relative to the moving traffic lane: a moving traffic lane - that part of the carriageway along which through traffic is moving at the present time. It is a dynamic ...


4

Simply: no. Move over only once there is a left turn lane. My preference is to arrive there towards the start of the left turn lane because that’s what other road users are expecting. There are two parts to the answer. First, the law allows you to use the left turn lane, and in most places requires you to do so if you make that turn. But it also requires ...


4

A couple of thoughts: Firstly, ITB problems can sometimes come from too much of an increase in weekly distance. A 5-10% increase per week seems to be the usual rule of thumb. It may be that adding your commute to your usual running was too much of an increase, and cutting back, and then gradually increasing could help. Secondly, you mentioned in comments ...


4

Since I exclusively ride cleated pedals, what I always do whenever I need to come to a full stop is to shift to a low enough gear (on flats I'd shift to 34/21 or 34/23 -- I have a 'compact', ie. 50/34 crank), unclip my left foot, brake, then as I come to a stop, I shift my body towards the top tube and stand over it with my left foot on the ground. Usually ...


3

If you can't time it so you don't actually get caught at the light, you pretty much just have to dismount. As Daniel R Hicks mentioned, you can use a curb if one's available, but that's not always the case. And on a personal note, my strong leg is my right leg and since I live in America, the curbs are on the right, which makes that method less appealing to ...


3

Two suggestions Stop further back from the intersection. This helps by not making you look to be in a hurry to cross, and that it will take you longer to take advantage of their "help". It has the disadvantage that you can't see the traffic as well, and cars that stop closer to the cross road can block your view. Choose a route that doesn't have such ...


3

Similar case from my personal experience- I hope it is helpful. Your post didn't mention what type of pedals and shoes you wear while cycling, but I found that if I used platform pedals and running shoes while I road, I ended up having a runner's knee condition with one knee. When I switched to wearing cycling shoes and SPD cleats the problem went away. My ...


3

This is a difficult question because ultimately when cycling in traffic there's no substitute for experience, and even then its really out of your hands when you get some bonehead behind the wheel. I can't imagine your age would come into play, but its good that you seem to be aware of the risks - I have a teenage daughter who will ride without lights and ...


3

If you continue straight from a right-turn only lane, what happens at the other side of the intersection? Either there's no lane for you, or else there's an area where cars will be pulling out to turn right onto your street. On the other hand, if you're out in the "go straight" lane, you're visible and predictable. To me, the question is, "How early do I ...


3

It's a year later, but you haven't yet accepted an answer, so this is how I would approach it. Keep in mind that I love bicycling on the road and think bicycling on the Interstate system is a fun and exciting pastime... After looking at your map and spending a little quality time with Street View, my first choice would be the obvious highway route, at least ...


2

Depending on your local regulations, claiming the lane might be illegal (it is here where I live, for example). So, my advice would it be to ride on the right side of the road (assuming that right is the driving side), but not getting too close to the curb because of the debris, gravel, car doors etc. When you see (and hear) someone behind you wanting to ...


2

A more specific suggestion: use 3M Diamond Tape (see impressive demonstration). It is really bright. Fun trivia: the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute tried to make it a standard for bike helmets, but none of 3Ms competitors could make a material so reflective. The best reflective material is fixed in your bike, so you will never forget it. Use: reflectors ...


2

The only really safe way to do this is to get off your bike and be a pedestrian. Depending on the drivers where you live, the amount of traffic, and your skill and confidence, this might just be the safest option. It might take you an extra 2 minutes to get where you are going. It might differ day to day depending on how much traffic is on the road, and ...


2

Generally speaking, at least in Germany a solid line must not be crossed therefore the left turn lane begins where the dashed line between the two initial lanes changes into a solid line. That does also mean that you should be on your target lane before the solid line starts, but it is wise to try to be there not too early – if I should give some reference ...


2

If I were in your shoes at this intersection, my plan off attack would vary greatly depending on the time of day, the weather conditions, and the specific traffic conditions. If it were particularly dark and/or rainy, I might cross as a pedestrian even when I'm familiar with the intersection and I have good lighting, just to reduce the risk of losing some ...


1

Well, you can't get around losing some/most of your momentum at a red light but if you do it clever, you can play with the timing of the lights and decrease your speed in such a way, that you won't have to stop completely. If you're very familiar with who gets green after whom, you can plan even better. Good practice is also to not put the feet down but ...


1

It may be that these drivers have become accustomed to cyclists (and perhaps pedestrians) who cross without right of way and are wary that you might do the same. I think you're doing the right thing by waiting and politely waving them on. This and educating casual cyclists about the rules of the road might slowly improve the situation. If you wish to ...


1

It may be worth bringing up the problem with the local government. If you can see a way to rework the intersection to avoid those problems, and they are inexpensive (usually a bike-bridge is going to be way over budget), there is a good chance you can get something done about it. I have seen intersections in my town reworked to improve safety. I was not ...


1

The typical case where where I encounter this is transitioning from a rideable shoulder to a right-turn lane. What I typically do, depending on the length of the turn lane and the amount of traffic, is stay on the right edge of the turn lane for that period of time where I can safely do so, to allow cars coming from behind to make a right turn. Then, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible