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13

These are the options I use depending on the circumstances: Trackstand: Requires a lot of practice and it is a bit of a swhowoff. (This is the one I use the less) Partially Dismount: Preferred when riding cleated pedals. Dominant foot stays on the pedal, and the pedal is kept ready for a full stroke (at 45 degrees over the horizontal as the other answer ...


11

This is not strictly a bicycling issue. Do-gooders who ignore the rules and want to give the right of way all the time are also irritating to other drivers. They are not necessarily safer drivers, because "scared" is not exactly the same thing as "safe". There isn't anything you can do; just take cautious advantage of the right of way and keep going. The ...


9

The Wikipedia entry for Iliotibial band syndrome suggests that some of possible causes may be Inadequate warm-up or cool-down Excessive up-hill and down-hill running Positioning the feet "toed-in" to an excessive angle when cycling This IT Band Pain Stretches, Treatment And Prevention article suggests "Having a properly fitted bike can help triathletes ...


7

If your commute is as up and down / stop and go as you say then I would suspect your knee problems are similar to mine. I've found through practice, and a few quick minute of research just now, that keeping your cadence (crank rotations per minute) high will help you keep from straining your knees on your ride; especially where you are making many stops, and ...


6

Since I exclusively ride cleated pedals, what I always do whenever I need to come to a full stop is to shift to a low enough gear (on flats I'd shift to 34/21 or 34/23 -- I have a 'compact', ie. 50/34 crank), unclip my left foot, brake, then as I come to a stop, I shift my body towards the top tube and stand over it with my left foot on the ground. Usually ...


4

A couple of thoughts: Firstly, ITB problems can sometimes come from too much of an increase in weekly distance. A 5-10% increase per week seems to be the usual rule of thumb. It may be that adding your commute to your usual running was too much of an increase, and cutting back, and then gradually increasing could help. Secondly, you mentioned in comments ...


4

Simply: no. Move over only once there is a left turn lane. My preference is to arrive there towards the start of the left turn lane because that’s what other road users are expecting. There are two parts to the answer. First, the law allows you to use the left turn lane, and in most places requires you to do so if you make that turn. But it also requires ...


4

Two suggestions Stop further back from the intersection. This helps by not making you look to be in a hurry to cross, and that it will take you longer to take advantage of their "help". It has the disadvantage that you can't see the traffic as well, and cars that stop closer to the cross road can block your view. Choose a route that doesn't have such ...


3

If you can't time it so you don't actually get caught at the light, you pretty much just have to dismount. As Daniel R Hicks mentioned, you can use a curb if one's available, but that's not always the case. And on a personal note, my strong leg is my right leg and since I live in America, the curbs are on the right, which makes that method less appealing to ...


3

Similar case from my personal experience- I hope it is helpful. Your post didn't mention what type of pedals and shoes you wear while cycling, but I found that if I used platform pedals and running shoes while I road, I ended up having a runner's knee condition with one knee. When I switched to wearing cycling shoes and SPD cleats the problem went away. My ...


2

A more specific suggestion: use 3M Diamond Tape (see impressive demonstration). It is really bright. Fun trivia: the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute tried to make it a standard for bike helmets, but none of 3Ms competitors could make a material so reflective. The best reflective material is fixed in your bike, so you will never forget it. Use: reflectors ...


2

Generally speaking, Saturdays and Sundays are quieter than weekdays. The Department of Transport collects various statistics on road use. This table (TRA0307) shows average traffic by time and day of the week. There's also this table (TRA0306) which shows average traffic by day for different road types and different vehicles. Finally, there are ...


2

The full answer is it depends, as Chris has commented. If it is really a country road, you can also encounter farm animals as they are being moved, or farm machinery (or it can encounter you). This can happen on any day of the week, as can the other kinds of traffic. In general the only category that might be expected to decline is commercial trucking on a ...


2

Generally speaking, at least in Germany a solid line must not be crossed therefore the left turn lane begins where the dashed line between the two initial lanes changes into a solid line. That does also mean that you should be on your target lane before the solid line starts, but it is wise to try to be there not too early – if I should give some reference ...


2

If I were in your shoes at this intersection, my plan off attack would vary greatly depending on the time of day, the weather conditions, and the specific traffic conditions. If it were particularly dark and/or rainy, I might cross as a pedestrian even when I'm familiar with the intersection and I have good lighting, just to reduce the risk of losing some ...


1

The roading network in the UK is well categorised so understanding what the different categories of roads are will assist you in planning a route: M Roads motorways bicycles are banned from using these. A Roads major roads intended to provide large-scale transport links within or between areas. These are generally dual carriageways and will have ...


1

Well, you can't get around losing some/most of your momentum at a red light but if you do it clever, you can play with the timing of the lights and decrease your speed in such a way, that you won't have to stop completely. If you're very familiar with who gets green after whom, you can plan even better. Good practice is also to not put the feet down but ...


1

It may be that these drivers have become accustomed to cyclists (and perhaps pedestrians) who cross without right of way and are wary that you might do the same. I think you're doing the right thing by waiting and politely waving them on. This and educating casual cyclists about the rules of the road might slowly improve the situation. If you wish to ...


1

It may be worth bringing up the problem with the local government. If you can see a way to rework the intersection to avoid those problems, and they are inexpensive (usually a bike-bridge is going to be way over budget), there is a good chance you can get something done about it. I have seen intersections in my town reworked to improve safety. I was not ...



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