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55

After 50+ years as a cyclist, this is my approach - ride according to the conditions ride in reasonable proximity to the curb if safe, move over a little as traffic approaches know where I'm going, and do it assertively if somebody honks / shouts / waves, assume that they must be a friend, or are telling me something important, so smile broadly and wave ...


31

As cyclists, we are vulnerable to any collision. A collision with a truck, bus, car, bicycle, pram, skateboard, rollerblader, pedestrian, dog, or even a domestic cat, will almost always cause a problem, if not an injury. Vehicle drivers are just people like us, except that they are in a comfortable safe box, maybe with crying kids in the back, and a have ...


26

There's a fake Buddha quote on some internet sites which says, "Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die." The most popular of the genuine Buddha quotes (the Dhammapada) begins with, "He abused me, he struck me, he overpowered me, he robbed me." Those who harbor such thoughts do not still their hatred. "He abused ...


20

Try making up a different backstory for the driver. You are already making one up, you know: speeds off to annoy the next bicyclist I do very well with assuming that the driver must have an unhappy marriage, or be on their way to a job they hate, or otherwise be preoccupied with their own misery, which impairs the way they drive. If they beep or say ...


16

There are tips here: Car Bike Collisions I especially like the first tip: Also there are tips about riding in traffic on pages 13 through 30 of this document: Cycling Skills Ontario’s Guide to Safe Cycling It's all good, including the pages about trucks and buses. Also the (Ontario-specific) law about riding on the right is interesting: HTA 147 - ...


13

I have a co-worker who rides into work on a ~30 mile one way trip. It's no problem for him because he's a good cyclist, has a good bike, and is used to that kind of distance. He's got his saddle worked out, his form is good, his lights are good, and he knows his route. The biggest problem he has is dealing with a locker room, and needing to move clothes ...


12

Pull off the road sooner. Sure, you have a right to be there, but it was quite clear that this creep wasn't prepared to accept that. Your safety is more important than taking the lane. Noting his license-plate number and car make/model as he vanishes into the distance isn't a bad idea either, in case you see him again.


11

The hard and fast rule is to do whatever it takes to keeps you safe. The first thing is to ride with lights at night and reflective gear. Generally, what I do is, if theres a wide enough shoulder I will use it. If there isn't, I take the lane. Being in a corner of a lane is a problem since motorists will try to sneak past and can't always judge the room ...


10

Firstly I would say that you should always ride in a way that is safe for you. If drivers have to wait as you take the necessary care, then so be it. They would have to wait hours if you fell and were killed. The only person taking responsibility for your safety is you. Here in Melbourne (Australia), in addition to train tracks, we have tram tracks. ...


8

The best revenge is riding your bike. Remember, they're stuck in a car, probably dealing with stop and go traffic, other jerk drivers and literally burning money from their gas tanks. You're on a bike, getting fresh air and exercise, probably making better time than the drivers, and definitely having a better time. Enjoy your self.


8

I'm from BC, you have the option of taking the centre of the lane and waiting like a vehicle, or you can stay to the right if there is room (at least 1.5m or 5ft). If you stay to the right, basically you ride in an imaginary bike lane if there isn't one painted on the road, so you ride all the way up to the light on the right hand side of a line of cars at a ...


8

32km per day is a lot for some one who is out of shape. I added the [commuter] tag to your post. If you click on it, you'll see hundreds of posts about commuting. Some are like this one, so your question may get closed if it's a duplicate. Since you know you have health issues, the conservative advice is to discuss your plan with your doctor. If it's ...


7

Be visible, be predictable (e.g. obey the rules, give hand signs, avoid sudden turns or braking) and leave a safety margin for the errors of others (e.g. don’t ride too close to parked cars). Personally I prefer riding on roads like any other vehicle and with quite a bit of distance to the curb. Edit: I forgot “be attentive”. E.g. Look over your shoulder ...


7

In the long term, you can also lobby and campaign for better cycling provision. The personal safety advice (better visibility etc.) is all valuable, but there is only so much you can do when a junction s poorly designed and creates conflict between different road users. Basically, if you feel unsafe on the road, then the road needs to be designed better. ...


6

I have actually dramatically improved the cutoff on my 1200 lumen dual LED (just for reference) with a sort of brim made out of aluminium plate. On road I run it on minimum brightness (guessing about 1/4 -- 1/3 power). On pitch dark bike paths I do change the angle a little as well as turning up the brightness. Super-speedy sketch (go inkscape!): The ...


6

This may sound simplistic. It's probably something you already do, and you can develop it further with practice and awareness. Acknowledge your feelings: "That interaction was very painful. I didn't like that at all." Then gently let them go: "Everything is OK. I am safe, and life keeps on going. This is great weather. When I get home, I'm going to listen ...


6

Speaking as a driver, what you can do: Be visible. During the day, this means bright-colored clothing. At night, lights and broad retro-reflector stripes. Urban camouflage may be fashionable, but it's also a good way to keep drivers from seeing you. Be predictable. Because you are one of the slowest vehicles on the road, everyone else is reacting to ...


6

I run The Bike Light Database (which started from a series of blog posts on this very Stack Exchange site). The Cygolite Hotshot and the NiteRider Solas are actually two of my top recommended lights, and I specifically recommend a setup similar to what you're describing. From the recommended taillights page: Putting the Cygolite Hotshot on your rack ...


4

In my youth I entertained some militant bicyclist thoughts, so let me share a few stories. (Notre Dame, Indiana) I was riding my bike home from the department. A car full of high-schoolers (or may be freshmen?) approached from behind. The dudes on the back seat came up with the bright idea of poking me with a baseball bat. They barely made contact, and I ...


4

I might be a dissenting voice on this site, as I more often drive than ride my bike on the road, but consider that it might be you being inconsiderate, if you pardon the pun. May be it's you hogging a lane or dashing to the right of a driver trying to make a right turn -- one cannot tell from your question. I also ride a motorcycle once in a while, and the ...


4

There's really not much you can do to prevent the onset of such feelings. It is your visceral response. I also think that if you're riding hard, there may be some biochemistry involved that makes angry emotions more pronounced. Just accept a certain amount of anger. There's nothing you can do about it in the brief moments during and after the incident. ...


4

If you do not want to kludge your existing headlight, Busch und Mueller Headlights always have a low beam feature, which they especially advertise. Here is their current catalogue. http://www.bumm.de/fileadmin/user_upload/Katalog/B_M__Catalogue_2014_15__English.pdf


4

I don't know your body condition: so ... "maybe"? Or, "maybe not now, but maybe soon"? I did 36 km per day (18 km each way): my body is male, aged 50+, weight 75 kg, height 182 cm, but with normal BP. For the first month or two, I didn't do 5 days/week. Some alternatives for you might include: Fewer days/week Only do it one-way somehow (e.g. cycle there, ...


4

Call the police. Get his plate number, his description and report him to the authorities. Idiots like that are too thick to talk to, it takes an officer to get through to them. Call the cops while you're riding, tell them you fear for your safety and let them hear the idiot shouting at you.


3

See them as human, with, alas, human limitations. People react first based on reflex including fight-or-flight, then based on their beliefs, their mood, recent experiences and experiences earlier in their history. Then after a while - if they are calm - they may start noticing the present. It's not about you. It's about their history. Driving ...


3

I find that more often than not, when I get mad at drivers, it is very often a reflection of my own mood. If I'm in a good mood, bad driving just washes over me. On the rare occasions I am in a bad mood for some reason, the slightest inconsideration by a driver gets me seething. The best response to bad, inconsiderate driving is to ignore it. (But I ...


3

Instead of getting mad at them remember that the people who honk or drive too close are need more education on how to drive on a complete street. It is our job as cyclists to do our best to follow the road rules. If you are doing that you can be confident that it is not your fault if you get honked at. Rather it is their ignorance of safe driving that is the ...


3

While the "wave" is the accepted an polite form of denying their kindness, I have found it ineffective. Part of the problem is that it is a passive, kind gesture similar to what they are doing. It leads to the ridiculous "no you first, please" situation and then the awkward simultaneous starts. Don't do this. YOU ARE A CYCLIST AND YOU KNOW THE RULES. ...


3

According to this Tokyo Metro Police Department (警視庁 Keishichō) web page on bicycle rules, the pet peeve of the authorities in Japan with regard to right turning cyclists is the practice of just going like cars through the turn. Three cases are specified, which all share the common theme that the cyclist, second class creature that it is, must turn right by ...



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