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1

While we do not have Idaho Rules here in Washington, there has been a push for it at times. A "dead red" law took effect for cyclists earlier this year, but that's a far cry from Idaho Rules.


6

Many or most other cyclists don't stop: but, other cyclists can get into 'accidents'. One advice, if there's a car or bike behind me then I use a hand signal (in lieu of a brake light) to indicate that I am about to slow to a stop. Unusually once on my commuting route (in Toronto), there was some bicycle police (who were giving traffic tickets to any ...


3

If you don't want to break the law... stop. If you want people driving cars and trucks to respect you... stop. If you don't want to risk a minor mistake of attention getting a cyclist killed... stop. If you are riding your bicycle to get exercise... stop. Just because you are pedaling your ass somewhere does not give you the right to run stop signs. Just ...


25

When it comes to stop signs, I live by some simple rules: If it's a multi-way stop and there's another car waiting or just arriving, I stop. If I can't clearly see or judge what I'm riding into, I stop. If it doesn't feel right for some reason, I stop. If there's a cop there (or a history of cops), I stop. I don't necessarily clip out and put my foot ...


8

Stop. Or at least slow down a lot, so that you look like you're taking care. Such signs are not really cyclist friendly. But if you don't take any notice of them then it reinforces the negative view many of the motor vehicle drivers have of us. Also, police officers generally have some discretion. It's only if they're bored or what you do is particularly ...


15

I'm not sure why you think it puts you in danger. My rule of thumb is that I will only do the Idaho stop when I can see all the roads at an intersection far enough to know that a car won't show up before I get through the intersection and I can't see any cars. I've been riding in the East Bay for 15+ years and I've never felt like my stopping at stop ...


2

1. Motion (not intention) Watch intensely the motion of a suspect vehicle, and consider it over anything else you think it's driver might do. When I see a vehicle threatening to cross my path, where time permits I'll seek to make eye-contact with the driver as outlined below, but penultimately the only thing to trust is it's actual movement... The front ...


1

Do you live in a region with efficient and non-corrupt police? Then it might be useful to get advice from them, and report the incidents to them. The police can sometimes act even if there has not been an actual collision. From your description, it seems that you think that driver behaviour is the problem, not your own skills. You should of course check if ...


2

In many cities, doing a 35 km (22 mi) commute will take you through parts of the city with different socioeconomic levels and different driver behaviors. Cyclist behavior that works well in one part of the city can lead to road rage in another place. It's valuable to recognize this and adapt your approach at different parts of your commute. Some years ago, ...


0

If you often have people coming at you from the side, you need to make yourself more visible from the side. Many front and back lights don't actually illuminate much to the side. To make yourself more visible, especially at night, add reflectors to your bike. You can go for the basic wheel reflectors, and you can also put white reflective tape along your ...


0

I appreciate the attitude towards the people driving around in a climate killing, lansdscape scarring murderweapon you display just in your subject but my first suggestion would be to soften your stance a bit, and take the opposing point of view. These people are likely not out to kill you. They are just not used to small, climatefriendly fitnessmachines on ...


5

It called a track stand. It originates in track racing on a velodrome, where in the opening stages of the individual sprint event you sometimes need to come to an almost complete halt. Tricky and dangerous to do if not well practiced, it can end in a 'sprawl of shame' if your technique is not perfect.


4

The technique you're probably thinking of is doing a "track stand".



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