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1

Like ShemSeger I am also located in BC, but it is my understanding that there may be more legal grey surrounding the topic than the blanket approval Shem is suggesting. From BikeSense BC: Passing on the right Passing vehicles on the right between intersections, especially in congested city traffic, is a topic of debate, even in the courts. Under ...


0

This is very good question as it touches one of the most common safety issue which most cyclists ignore. If you are on the road without bike lanes, you must stay after the car, just like another ca would do, not the right/left side of a car. The reason is the safety. If you stand on the right side (or left if you are in left-sided country), the car which ...


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Depends on whether there is a bike lane or not. In Canada, a bicycle is legally a vehicle, and unless you have a clear lane which you are permitted to use, you are required to wait behind the other vehicles. Note that a paved shoulder (pavement to the right of the white line) is not a bike lane when not clearly marked as one.


6

I'm from BC, you have the option of taking the centre of the lane and waiting like a vehicle, or you can stay to the right. If you stay to the right, basically you ride in an imaginary bike lane if there isn't one painted on the road, so you ride all the way up to the light on the right hand side of a line of cars at a red light. I do this pretty much every ...


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The light controls the stop line (and, if there is one, the advance stop line). I can't tell from the streetview image, or from streetview itself or the satellite view, whether the cycle path moves from the road to the footway before the stop line or not. If it does - you don't have to cross the line, and the light doesn't affect you (so long as you ...



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