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1

If you can find some other tube on the bike frame that fits the clamp better, that should be fine. Obviously if you attach the clamp too high, the trailer will be tilted at an angle which would be uncomfortable for your kid. I used to have a trailer with a similar attachment. I noticed that the clamp can have a tendency to come loose from vibration, if ...


2

I had a similar trailer clamp it was terrible, I ended up buying a hitch that connects to the axle and removed the clamp. I attached a length of aluminum tubing with some holes drilled in it in place of the clamp. I slip the tube over the axle hitch and then use a hitch pin to keep it all in place. Its on my other bike currently but the hitch looks like ...


2

For my daily commute and for moderate sized weekly grocery trips I use two waste baskets, permanently mounted, each with 6 gallon capacity. They serve as waterproof hard shells into which I can insert any bags, backpacks, clothes etc, that I want.


1

I have a croozer kid trailer (actually a Mec.ca equivalent from the mid 2000's) and it has the same square spring loaded hitch that is in this question. I also am in the predicament of trying to acquire the appropriate bike-side hitch bracket for the hitch. But after reading comments about how the spring mechanism is not very pleasurable to use, I'm ...


1

I go grocery shopping with my bike all the time, I put groceries in touring panniers mounted on a rear rack. They are a little cumbersome to load but I can fit a lot of stuff. You can't fit a week's worth of groceries for a family of 5, though, so it depends on your situation. For a solution more elegant for shopping, you can buy square-shaped shopping ...


1

Many grocery stores do deliveries. There's also taxis. Living without a car and having to get groceries for my family has taught me that bicycles aren't always the best solution. About once a month plan a big trip and get a list of all the heavy, non-perishables items you will need. This will include canned goods, frozen meats and vegetables, dried goods ...


4

There are trailers in a similar form factor, like the Burley Travoy (no recommendation, just the first I found), that are made for the purpose. These will be a lot more stable than any home made conversion of something that was never designed to go faster than slow walking pace.


1

I agree with Blams comment, I don't think you would want to pull that cart behind a bike. Since you still want to take it into the store, maybe use that cart & mount it on a flatbed trailer with bungee cords. Something like this maybe: http://www.burley.com/page_453/flatbedsuptmsup


9

I think you would be much better off converting an old kids trailer. They can be found pretty cheap on Craigslist.


0

For B&B touring on a road bike, large seat bag works nicely. The weight is higher on the bike than with rear rack and panniers, but it solves clearance issues. Carradice of Nelson makes some nice ones. Brake power on a road bike is mostly limited by weight distribution. You will lift the rear wheel before locking the front wheel or running out of ...


0

I would avoid a trailer. On rear rack you are going to have heal clearance limits. It may seem extreme but get a front fork with braze-ons. Braze-on on the inside and outside for really solid rack mounting - check out the Salsa Vaya. Not going to cost you more than a trailer and ride a lot nicer. Also consider frame bags. Check out ...



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