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19

The usual trail etiquette rules are, basically: Cyclists yield to everybody Everybody yields to horses If you're both cyclists (or both hikers, etc), somebody going downhill yields to somebody going uphill So as a pedestrian going uphill on a narrow path, the cyclists were supposed to yield to you. However, if you looked like you were stepping off the ...


18

Passing a horse, mounted or otherwise, should be done so: very slowly as quiet as possible. If you have a loud freehub, pedal slowly -- do your best not to coast. with as much space & consideration as possible no sudden movements limit the number of cyclists going past It all depends on the horses' temperament. Some are OK, some like cars but not ...


11

Officially: Bikes yield to hikers and horses. Hikers are fine, if you call it out and pass when safe. Horses can spook easily. Once you see it, stop. Wait for the rider to signal you by. Often I have been simply asked to walk my bike by. Easy. Sometimes it's best to just wait for them to pass. In your situation, I would get within 10 - 20 yards, and ...


11

You can use google maps, and click on the bike to see local bike paths and trails. (still in beta but very good nonetheless. http://www.bikely.com http://www.mapmyride.com http://www.ridethecity.com http://www.pedaling.com are some of the more popular routing sites, I'm sure there are more but that should get you started :)


11

All through my childhood I observed land turtles - more than half of the garden was turtle territory. The reasons for this behavior that immediately spring to mind are: Being cold blooded animals they rely very much on sunlight and warm temperatures during the day to be active. So (like lizards and snakes), they like to chill out in all those places where ...


8

To answer your question title in very short: You don't have to fear them but some healthy portion of respect won't be wrong. The longer version: normally cow herds aren't really aggressive so it is quite safe to just go around the herd (if it blocks the trail) or pass them if they're close to the trail. Going right through the herd isn't a good idea in any ...


6

OpenCycleMap, based on OpenStreetMap, is another resource you might consider. It uses a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike license, which is why many of the mobile applications actually use the OpenCycleMap data. Anyone can register and contribute to OpenCycleMap, so in that sense it is like Wikipedia, in that it is often more up-to-date. Just looking ...


6

Whenever you pass a horse, whether walking the bike or rolling, make sure to stay well clear of the hind end. Horses spook easily and may instinctively kick if something approaches them from behind that they can't see or see very well. I'd suggest staying outside of 4 metres/yards behind, or 2 metres/yards to the side of any strange horse no matter how tame ...


5

No one has mentioned it here, but horse owners and llama-packers and mule riders have ALL commented to me : PLEASE STAY BELOW THE ANIMAL AT ALL TIMES WHEN YIELDING OR OVERTAKING. These animals get more spooked by threats from above, (where the threat looks larger or looks like they can pounce) then from below (where the threat seems much smaller).


5

I'm a member of Warm Showers, and regularly host cross-country bike tourists and get to check out their gear. Except for the occasional monk with orange robes and a small backpack, what bike tourists choose has been surprisingly uniform. It's usefully Ortlieb panniers on front and rear racks, and sometimes a handlebar bag. The details and presence of the ...


5

Something that has not been mentioned so far. Be aware of the herding dog. In the area where I bike (South Italy), herds are usually left with a couple of herding dogs by the shepherd. The only bad experience I had with a herd was not with cows itself, but with a dog. Since then, I pass through if there is no dog, or I wait/turn around if there is a herding ...


5

When I read your question I had a vague recollection of reading something not so long ago about this. Have a look at this article from a UK newspaper (check out also the related articles on the page): Cow Attacks So you are absolutely right to be cautious - people have been killed by cows. Personally, I live in a rural area (the New Forest in southern UK ...


5

A lot depends on what you mean by "trail/downhill" and by "work". It wasn't that long ago that a full squish 100mm fork bike was a full on downhill machine. However, the big drawback to that bike as a descender is the relatively steep head angles. Putting a bigger fork will help with that, but it won't help with the issue of how robust the parts are ...


4

Go to http://connect.garmin.com, and click on the "Explore" link. Type in the region that you're interested in, and you'll see bike routes that others have ridden on. It's a great way to find new routes and there's very detailed GPS data (and elevation profiles!) available for each one of those routes. Here's an example of routes that I found for my ...


4

So far most of what have been suggested are handtools... some planning and design tools are important as well. Get a copy of the International Mountain Biking Association's book, "Trail Solutions: IMBA's Guide to Building Sweet Singletrack." Find it here: http://www.imba.com/catalog/book-trail-solutions I spent the last three winters designing and ...


4

I slow down and address the rider in a conversational, even sing-song, tone "Good morning, rider. There are two bikes behind you. Is it Ok for us to pass?" (They almost always say "yes" and thank me/us for alerting them, but it also gives them the option to ask me to dismount or hold back). Note that despite your having addressed the rider, the ...


4

Both seatposts you mention use an air spring, with a hydraulic release. There is no maximum weight listed for either one. They are designed to use your body weight to drop the saddle when the remote lever is pressed, and to use an air spring to return it to full height the next time it is pressed. You need to be off the seat when the lever is pressed to ...


4

For a trip that you describe, I would actually recommend using both a rear rack system and a front rack system. I have not used a front rack system, but I understand that it changes the handling of the bike. Having basically four panniers, two on front and two on back, will allow you to distribute the weight around so that you are left/right balanced and ...


4

By looking at the current frame geometry at http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-gb/bikes/model/anthem.x4/7865/45505/#geometry we can assume the following. Descending: HA: 71 degrees head angle is pretty steep for downhill but for flowy singetracks it will be good. For the "steepish rocky tracks" it really depends on what you consider steep. Anything more ...


3

There are many horses in the area where I live. I often encounter horses on the trails, and I've had occasion to talk to the riders about proper procedure. Accumulated advice (so far): Talk to the horse as you're passing. "Hi horsey! Aren't you a pretty horsey?" -- that type of goofy talk. It's (allegedly) calming and lets the horse know that you're human. ...


3

Cross bikes are generally ok for less serious trails where you're looking for decent speed, without the need for serious climbing, suspension and traction. You've got more clearance on a cross than a road bike, but the frame is a similar size and they've generally got 700mm road size rims, so they aren't as maneuverable as an MTB. They generally don't have ...


3

I am posting this as a separate answer because it is so different from my commentary on planning and design... We don't like to think of people as tools. Usually only law enforcement types think of regulations as tools... but think of both of these as well. I have worked for four different land management agencies in the U.S. and have built or ...


3

Communication is key. I have a cowbell I attach to my bike when riding on trails so people know that a bike is coming. Or that a cow is speeding toward them. Either way, the trails I go on are vacant, save for the occasional hiker, and they're often courteous enough to move off the trail in order to let me go by. I thank them as I pass by because hikers ...


3

Rinse your bike off. There is usually a hose close to the trail head/end that you can use. Be careful how you aim the spray around your suspensions. You don't want to aim down in them. Make sure you clean the cassette and chain. That was an expensive mistake i made by not doing so. I usually do this at home because i remove all the oil and dirt with a ...


3

Clean everything up and lubricate your chain. Wash the suspension and make sure the seals are fine. If you have a rear suspension pay attention to the pivots. For the rest it will pretty much be covered in a pre-ride check. Check out the questions tagged cleaning here on Bicycles SE to read some interesting information on how to clean different parts of the ...


3

Changing from 50 to 65 (or the opposite) is definitely noticeable. And depending on your needs, switching may improve your riding. Switching from 50 to 65 will mean more pressure on the front end. That means better cornering (the front end will not wash out easily) and more stability on the downhill. Some people also mention that it'll improve climbing on ...


3

In the shortest way of answering this, yes, they will be suitable for trail/xc use. All flat pedals are relatively the same. They only differ in the amount of pins, contact area, weight and their thickness. You'll want something on the thin side for trail use, as you'll be pedaling quite a bit more than if you were on a downhill bike. This will help to ...


2

I can see that nobody has yet mentioned http://www.bikeroutetoaster.com which I use for route creation before I head out on an unknown territory. Slowdown uphill calculation based on steepness The best thing about it is that you can set few parameters (defaults are quite fine for advanced recreation) and it calculates timing based on these parameters which ...



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