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8

To answer your question title in very short: You don't have to fear them but some healthy portion of respect won't be wrong. The longer version: normally cow herds aren't really aggressive so it is quite safe to just go around the herd (if it blocks the trail) or pass them if they're close to the trail. Going right through the herd isn't a good idea in any ...


5

A lot depends on what you mean by "trail/downhill" and by "work". It wasn't that long ago that a full squish 100mm fork bike was a full on downhill machine. However, the big drawback to that bike as a descender is the relatively steep head angles. Putting a bigger fork will help with that, but it won't help with the issue of how robust the parts are ...


5

When I read your question I had a vague recollection of reading something not so long ago about this. Have a look at this article from a UK newspaper (check out also the related articles on the page): Cow Attacks So you are absolutely right to be cautious - people have been killed by cows. Personally, I live in a rural area (the New Forest in southern UK ...


5

Something that has not been mentioned so far. Be aware of the herding dog. In the area where I bike (South Italy), herds are usually left with a couple of herding dogs by the shepherd. The only bad experience I had with a herd was not with cows itself, but with a dog. Since then, I pass through if there is no dog, or I wait/turn around if there is a herding ...


4

By looking at the current frame geometry at http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-gb/bikes/model/anthem.x4/7865/45505/#geometry we can assume the following. Descending: HA: 71 degrees head angle is pretty steep for downhill but for flowy singetracks it will be good. For the "steepish rocky tracks" it really depends on what you consider steep. Anything more ...


3

In the shortest way of answering this, yes, they will be suitable for trail/xc use. All flat pedals are relatively the same. They only differ in the amount of pins, contact area, weight and their thickness. You'll want something on the thin side for trail use, as you'll be pedaling quite a bit more than if you were on a downhill bike. This will help to ...


2

Depends on your riding style. If you feel that riding on trails is too jarring to your wrists and don't like drop bars, then go for the crosstrail. It's a hybrid, it's kind of part way to mountain bike, but not really suited to agressive offroad riding. On this bike you'll be more upright than on a road bike, You're in a less agressive postion for road ...


2

As a horse owner I can answer this from experience. If approaching the horse from behind it is important to slow down, as you approach the horse shout 'bike' or make some noise - bikes are very quiet and if you suddenly 'appear' in the horses line of vision and it didn't hear you approach you'll spook it. Pass wide and slow. If approaching from the front, ...



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