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10

Most bikes I've looked at (and purchased) via craigslist and other online listings don't usually state miles, just condition. I think most bicycle owners don't have odometers. The mileage I keep track of is more for my own knowledge and maintenance scheduling. Keeping track of when I change the chain, or how long tires last type of thing. That said, I ...


10

what are the drawbacks of using an exercise bike? Noise (you mentioned this) Many quickly get bored riding on an exercise bike Promotes bad cycling form Can be large, heavy, expensive My favorite alternative to riding in the snow in the winter is to ride on rollers. The rollers I have used have several advantages Not as boring Amazing for form ...


10

It will have no negative affect on your bicycle to leave the bike in a trainer for long periods, assuming you have the trainer properly adjusted for the width of your rear axle, and that you do release the roller from the tire as you noted. In addition, in response to your comment, it will not affect the trainer at all, either.


9

You can use a trainer on a mountain bike, but a big issue that you will run into if you don't want to change set-up between the trainer and your rides on the weekend is that running knobbly tyres on a trainer is just plain noisy. If you are determined to run the same tyre on the trainer as off-road, I'd recommend looking into the tyres that have a raised, ...


9

I picked up a set of interlocking rubber tiles (for gym equipment) at Home Depot to put under my trainer and bike. They help with the vibration although I find it's still quite loud. It also helps having neighbours that are noisier than me, they can't really complain about the bike.


9

Baffling - place it on carpet or a rug (and several towels), this will both stop vibration through the floor and catch the drips of sweat.


8

If this is the kind you have, then leaving the bike in there should make no difference whatsoever. This trainer clamps onto the rear axle, it doesn't even touch the frame. When you're off the bike, the frame doesn't have to do anything except support its own weight - there's no possible way it could get damaged. You're probably less likely to damage the ...


7

The only significant frame damage I can think of from this is your skewers -- the little nubs that grab on to the skewer and hold your bike inside the trainer have a tendency to scratch the hell out of the skewers. As far as flexing goes, all frames flex. The only time I would be worried about it would be if there was a grinding noise coming out of the ...


7

Mileage is mileage regardless of how it was incurred.However I think most people are more concerned with condition than miles.Five thousand miles of downhill with maintainence donsn't compare with 500 miles on a bike path while left in the rain and no maintainence.


7

Shouldn't be a problem to leave the "quick release" of the trainer engaged. It's ultimately pressing on the ends of the axle, applying pressure the same way the skewer does. There will be some slight compression of the axle, with added pressure on the bearings as a result, but so long as the pressure isn't extreme (ie, it's on the same order as the ...


6

Almost certainly you will damage that pivot and possibly the suspension action. I've used a trainer with a normal quick release skewer, and it tends to mash up the drive side, even if it's a metal end. Plastic ones get destroyed - that's a lot of weight to be putting through something that isn't designed to be weight bearing in that fashion. My trainer came ...


6

Another option which requires only a little bit of set up is get a wheel for use only with the trainer. If you hunt around buy & sell forums, you should be able to find a cheap wheel and cassette and slick tires only cost $20-30. When you want to use your trainer, just switch wheels.


6

I can't recommend any specifics offhand, other than I've used two different types of Tacx trainers and have been very happy with them. Both were in the $150-$200 range new. A couple of comments though: a & b: Virtually any trainer on the market is going to be pretty stable unless you are out of the saddle and sprinting. As long as it's not a really low ...


6

This is not an answer to your question but rather an update. Racermate has announced a recall for all "blue" flywheels, and they are replacing them. Here is the announcement and a form to get the replacement: http://www.racermateinc.com/blue-flywheel-recall/


6

Rollers (and trainers in general) chewing up tires isn't uncommon as indicated in this answer on a related question: http://bicycles.stackexchange.com/a/10748/4239 As indicated, just use cheap tires for your rollers. I ride them in the winter and I've never really noticed that the rollers chew up the tires much faster than the the snow, ice, salt, and ...


6

I assume you mean the quick release skewer and the answer is no, well at least not in my experience. I've spent a few years riding on the training skewer from my Tacx trainer and had no issues outside of the visual detraction of a silver skewer on black rims/wheels.


6

I don't see why not, unless you plan on braking while on the trainer? Theoretically you could still have a rim failure because the wheel/tire pushes against the resistance wheel. However, this is a constant tension, not sudden impacts. If a spoke were to become loose though, the rim could fail and the wheel could implode, but since your on a trainer it's not ...


6

The guy using it apparently is Hans-Henrik Oersted who was sponsered by chinelli. The company recently did a rerun of two jerseys to honor him. The picture can also be found on cinellis website about the jerseys so i wrote a request for information to their customer service. They answered it is a handmade trainer build especially for Hans-Henrik Oersted in ...


6

Let's start with some quick maths. I'm guessing the roller has a diameter of 40mm based on the picture. Since it's in contact with the tyre, whatever speed your speedo reads is how fast that roller is going. But it's 40mm in diameter. So, at 72kph / 45mph we have: Speed = 72kph = 20m/s Diameter = 40mm = 0.04m Circumference = π d = 0.125m Revs per second = ...


6

Apparently you are not the first victim of this problem: http://www.saferproducts.gov/ViewIncident/1237585 I suggest you should also submit an incident report to the CPSC (assuming you are in the US). Since you were injured you may also want to talk to a personal injury lawyer. RacerMate's website claims they offer an "indestructable build". The ...


6

Buy a recumbent exercise bike instead and you'll be much more able to play games. But if you're training for serious upright riding rather than general fitness that will not be what you want. I have used one of these for a while and used to read while riding it. That worked fine, but once my broken collarbone healed I lost interest (but I live in Sydney ...


5

The noise will always be an issue and it will depend on your personal space issues, but I went on gumtree (a London equivalent of craigslist) and got a dirt cheap, old beat up road bike as my turbo bike - at least that would remove the hassle of lugging it up and down the stairs. That way, I wasn't killing my normal road machines, nor did I have to reset ...


5

My only cycle trainer experience is with the one I bought, an Elite Fluid Primo. It's a fluid trainer with a beefy stand, so less noisy than other types and the design is fairly simple. Just a matter of clamping the trainer onto the bike's rear axle and you're ready to go. As an apartment-dweller, I've got the whole thing setup on rubber tiles from Home ...


5

Just buy an inexpensive metal seat post, and if eventually it wears out it wears out. That seems to be your least expensive option. Especially if it's just a trainer bike. Just lube it up with either a little bit of oil or odorless teflon grease.


5

The only reason a worn rim is dangerous on the road is that you would fall of were it to fail. On a trainer your weight is held by the axle, not the rim, so a rim failure would be nothing more than a minor annoyance.


5

How about aerobars without the bars? You just need the tv set on floor slightly tilted so you don't break your neck. For example Zipp Alumina Clip has several possible setups for comfortable "riding" position. You can ride in sitting position every now and then to stretch your hip and back. Remember to keep your back straight and shoulders down. :)


4

To make it easier on myself I purchased a cheap wheel on eBay and added a trainer specific tire such as the Continental Ultra Sport Hometrainer Tire. When I used regular road tires, the rubber wore out quickly. The trainer specific tire lasts much longer. You do not want to run the trainer specific tire on the roads. So having a spare wheel with cassette ...


4

No, using a "trainer" skewer on the road has no negative impact on your bike or safety. The skewer which comes with a trainer is mecahnically and functionally identical to the one that came on your bike, with the exception of the shape of the "heads" on the trainer skewer. It is actually identical to one of the original skewer designs. The reason that one ...



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