Hot answers tagged

43

The short answer is: not that difficult. The long answer requires some explanation. The equations of motion for a rider on a bicycle are well-understood if not always well-known. The power needed to propel a bicycle on firm flat ground (as on a velodrome) varies approximately with the cube of speed. Thus, to double your speed, you would need to increase ...


38

First thing first: Barbie should NEVER suffer a penalty because of Ken's preferences or athletic level. It is up to Ken to solve by himself the problem of making Barbie enjoy the ride. Leaving her alone is not fine, unless she explicitly, truly says it is. One possibility could be to add weight to Ken's bike, or maybe Ken could choose, among his many bikes, ...


35

There are several different types of power meter on the market and each measures something slightly different in order to make their estimates. In addition, the way that they measure what they measure has implications for their accuracy. Below I discuss what the major models measure, how they measure it, and the implications for accuracy. Power is the rate ...


28

A heavier bike may not handle as well as a lighter bike, and can be less enjoyable to ride. It's more fun to ride farther and faster, so a lighter bike is probably more likely to be used. Also, you can make a bike heavier by hauling stuff on it, it's hard to make a bike lighter! I'd suggest that someone who wanted to get in shape pedal further and faster ...


21

If Ken is training that hard, he should have rest days with easy rides. Barbie should join him on a rest day easy ride, preferably the day after the hardest ride he does all week. Ken should also realize that allowing Barbie to set the pace ensures that he will not be over training. As heltonbiker has mentioned in his comment, this can also be done on the ...


20

Regular aerobic exercise is definitely of value for preparing for a big ride. Spin is a good preparation in conjunction with some outdoor rides, but it is not a substitute for riding your bike on the road. The feel of the bike, the balance, the momentum, and the environmental and traffic factors will have an effect on your fitness as well, some of which ...


18

To a large extent the comment by @wdypdx22 is correct. The primary exception being if you are working out in a hilly area. The weight or mass of the bike and rider makes a big difference in the initial acceleration, but once moving on flat ground inertial effects take over. While most riders do all they can to keep from starting and stopping frequently, ...


18

The correct answer is both. You should do a long ride, around 80% of your goal distance 4 days before your actual ride, and then rest off the bike for 3 days. That gives your body a wake up call that serious exercise is coming, and then a rest period to build up for it. This answer has some explanation about why, but the only real debate is in the timing ...


17

The answer to this question is dependent on a number of factors, but the short answer is just 'yes'. If you are purely looking for weight loss then the equation is calores in minus calories out equals delta, and so long as the delta is negative, i.e. that you burn more than you consume, then you will lose weight. It's just simple arithmetic. So, in the ...


16

This happens during nesting season. These birds get aggressive and try to protect their territory near the nest. They should stop this behavior when nesting season is over. One main suggestion I've seen seem to be to look them in the eyes. Also, you might try to put wire ties or ribbons in your helmet facing up and back to deter the attacks. However, ...


16

I would suggest that if Ken and Barbie want to continue biking together that Ken should learn that not every bike ride has to be about getting a work out or training. I mean, what happens when little sister Kelly visits and wants to go for a bike ride with them? Is Ken going to just leave them in the dust? Alternatively if Ken really insists on trying to ...


14

How big of a difference is there between them? The difference is this big... http://www.flickr.com/photos/bobmarley753/249120602/ Seriously though, after some research and asking friends, many who have aluminum rollers prefer them over PVC rollers The unasked question: Which one would you buy? Neither! Some of my friends have rollers that are ...


14

The reason (and I'm no medical expert) is that it acts as a gradual cool-down period after the hard exercise. During any exercise it is good to cool-down by still moving and exerting less effort. Keeping the muscles moving helps remove lactic acid from the muscles (which contributes to cramping) and keeps the blood flowing. Also sudden changes between hard ...


14

Advice in book Racing Weight by Matt Fitzgerald goes something like this, paraphrased: Yes, training without carbohydrates will train your body to use stored fat better. But your capacity to train will go down (not enough fuel!), and net result will be less improvement. It references this study, which compares two groups of athletes on hi-carb and low-carb ...


13

Entirely depends on the lenght of ride. If you're riding for less than 2 hours then your body already has everything on board that it needs. If you're working for more than 2 hours you should eat complex carbs (pasta, oatmeal) 2 hours before the ride so that they have time to digest before you actually need them. Also eating too much just before can limit ...


13

I'm in the do it this year camp. In comments you say you can currently ride probably a painful 60 (miles). In general, a conservative plan is to extend your ride distances by 10% per week. But it's important to realize that marathon and iron man athletes do not train by running a marathon each week. The aim of their training is to build deep core fitness ...


12

A technique which may help you get a more efficient pedaling stroke is an exercise called isolated leg. With your bicycle on a trainer or on a slight uphill, unclip your left leg and pedal using only your right leg for 30-60 strokes. Then switch and do the same for your other leg. This exercise will give a very natural feel to how your legs should be ...


12

Echoing what others have said, anything that gets you riding trumps all else. If you would ride to work, but not in the wet, fenders will help you get fit. If that's what it takes to get you riding, that's the most important thing to do. Do you wear a suit at work? Drive your car 1 day / week, so you can keep fresh clothes at the office. Suddenly driving ...


12

This link "Quick note: Eating is the key to long distance biking" says, If you don't eat, you have an hour, maybe two, of energy stored up. Fortunately it's prescriptive too, saying, And what should these calories be? Well, something easy on your stomach and fairly light. There are special sporting-related products that are generally right ...


12

Riding 50 miles (80km) in a day is a fairly modest goal. Doing it three days in a row is only slightly more ambitious. As a fit (as you will be when you do it) person to ride 80km, you could expect to take 3 to 3.5 hours if you rode hard, and 4 hours if you took it easy. The difference is how you will feel the next day. For the actual ride, plan on taking ...


11

Speed is very difficult to use as a measure due to the fact that the measurements have to occur in an uncontrolled environment. Power, on the other hand is great because it's unaffected by the environment - it's a pure measure of what you're capable of doing at that moment on the bike. A lot of power data has been collected by awesome folks like Andy Coggan ...


11

Your question is simple but a full answer is complex. The simplest answer is to point to Part 2 (especially chapter 4) of Wilson and Papadopoulos (2004), or the recent review by Debraux et al. (2011), or the paper by Martin et al. (1998). However, even these papers do not cover approaches that take better advantage of the data available from modern bicycle ...


11

Breath however you need to, to get oxygen in. This may be mouth, nose or a combination of both. When you see riders on their trainers warming up, the cotton has something like vapor rub or similar, to help open up the nasal passages. They don't have it in their nose during the race itself.


11

If they're ambitious, they could try out a tandem, so that Ken can do more of the work while still riding at the same pace as Barbie. Just remember that this can potentially cause unhappiness in its own ways, if they don't work together well!


10

What should you look for in a set of rollers? Price Resistance if you want it (Kreitler has a nice belt driven 'killer headwind') Noise level, especially if you live above someone (I am not sure that even Kreitler can solve this problem without some dampening). Size and weight - if you will be transporting them to races and have limited space. ...



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