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5

Its not the distance, its the time on the bike. Assuming this is not a solo ride, you'll be riding with other people either in a proper rotating bunch ride, or just on the same road/direction as them. This alone will increase your overall speed by as much as 20%. If you can be seated on a bike for 6 hours in a day, you can do this ride. You will need to ...


2

I say go for it. If you can do a 50 mile ride, you can do a century. I will agree with @andy56 and say that this ride will be much different from any of your weekend rides. You're going to need to eat more and drink a ton, your backside will hate you, and it could be torture, but you can finish the ride. My first century I rode after a previous long ride ...


2

NO, you're not ready. I'm usually very encouraging for people to go for challenges, for example Training involved to ride 175 miles (281 km) in a day But your situation is more like 1/3 Century or Metric Century? Often, if you have to ask, the answer in no. You can think about it like this: for a given fitness level, each time you ride 50% further than ...


0

CO2 Cannister - beats a pump any day for getting up and rolling again quickly. But always carry a pump for backup. Invest in clothing. There's an increasing trend to Rain / Wind jerseys rather than full-on rain jackets. My favourites are the SS Castelli Gabba and the SS Sportful Fiandre. Gilet, arm-warmers, knee and leg warmers. Versatile kit as part of a ...


1

Lots of good advice so far, here are my tips. Glasses - I'm lucky enough to live somewhere with a lot of sunlight, so sunglasses are essential. But, even if you don't need sun protection, clear or yellow glasses will protect your eyes from bugs, grit and other foreign objects. (Try stopping safely when you've been blinded by something coming off the road ...


6

For the UK there are traffic statistics available. This graph from the 2015 Road Traffic Estimates shows the general trend for cars. There are detailed tables of traffic flow available. There is also geographical data available in the form an interactive map. This isn't broken down by time of day, but should give you an indication of which roads ...


2

I like Morten's answer. It covers a lot of ground. A power meter these days - is the de facto tool to train with. They have dropped a lot in price over recent years - but still expensive - if you are just starting out. And like any tool has to be used in the correct way (training). You can still get away with using a heart rate monitor - and they are useful ...


4

I'm taking a different view to @Morten 's answer. A good cyclist is one who survives every trip, by successfully avoiding all the hazards while not being a hazard to other fellow road-users. That means: Obeying red lights and stop signs (don't piss off everyone else waiting at the control) Looking out for road users who haven't seen you (including ...


1

I'd like to introduce another axis: Tire material. Soft grippy material vs. Hard less grippy material. The Soft grippy material has the advantages on grippiness, smoother riding, less rolling resistance, but has the disadvantages of getting more flats (for the same thickness of material) and of wearing out faster. The reason for getting more flats for ...


4

Assuming you mean a fast cyclist, your best long-term plan is to find ways to enjoy or otherwise remain motivated to train year-round so that you can be consistent for the next many years. Starting from 0, assuming you are consistent, you can hope to be a a fast guy in about 3 years and among the elite (in your age/weight class) in 6. There are many ...


3

Training tyres are somewhere in the product line below race tyres but above economy tyres. They should cost around the same as a touring or commuting tyre, cost less than a race tyre, and will cost more than a budget tyre. Training tyres will have more durability than a race tyre, but will be slightly heavier. The idea is to save your valuable race rubber ...


6

The difference in rolling resistance is small but can be seen in time trial results and maybe in mass start races. The more noticeable difference is that typically race tires have smoother ride because the thinner casing transmits less vibration. Note that the categories are not clear and one manufacturer's tire marketed as training tire may have less ...



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