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9

Riding 50 miles (80km) in a day is a fairly modest goal. Doing it three days in a row is only slightly more ambitious. As a fit (as you will be when you do it) person to ride 80km, you could expect to take 3 to 3.5 hours if you rode hard, and 4 hours if you took it easy. The difference is how you will feel the next day. For the actual ride, plan on taking ...


2

Just start riding and work your way up. Ride 3-5 days per week, starting with 10 miles per ride. Add 5-10 miles per week to your rides until you can do 50 and still be ready to ride again the next day. That should get you in condition for a 150-mile ride (spread over 3 days) within one to two months.


4

Let me expand on the answer provided by @Mac. There are two important concepts here that need to be unpacked, 1) endurance training when in a fasted state and 2) eating either before or during an endurance training ride. If your goal is improved fat metabolism, endurance training in a fasted state (e.g., 8 hours without food, no eating during exercise) ...


4

According to an Australian Institute of Sport article about Eating before exercise: Exercising in a fasted state (8 hours since the last meal) results in a greater proportion of fat being used as the exercise fuel compared to doing the same workload after a carbohydrate-containing meal or snack. However, it is possible that you may be able to exercise ...


2

No Science Opinion #2 By not continuing to boost your blood sugar, your boy will theoretically switch to a metabolic state that burns more fat. I have seen endurance racers do it both ways. I have seen guys that may snack a bit inbetween, but will basically just eat two or three meals during a long race and not much in between. I also have seen guys that ...


0

Sorry, no science... Last winter I did quite a lot of base miles and largely didn't eat during the rides of about (50/60 miles) though occasionally I'd stop of a coffee & cake close to home. I generally felt quite tired and hungry (I wanted to eat for Britain so to speak). In mid March I went on my first longer ride (which ended up at 102 miles). I ate ...


1

I'll second Eric's answer, but with a little more detail. There is no way to exercise that will produce "spot removal" of fat. The only way to do that is via liposuction. Each person's body will deposit fat differently. For instance, my body starts with deposits on my lower back, then on my belly, and then my upper arms and face. Other people start on their ...


6

You can't really burn "tummy fat." Your body has an order that it will store fat in and it will lose fat in the reverse order. You can lose bodyfat, but it goes away in the reverse order that you put it on. You can make it appear that you've proportionally lost more weight in your tummy by building up the muscles there.


5

When you say "to burn tummy fat", presumable you're talking about weight loss and general toning? What worked for me was a short, 10-minute / 2-point-something km commute, twice a day, five days a week, over two or three years. Because the ride was so short I was able to give pretty much 100% for the whole ride, with natural stops at red lights. I went ...



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