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10

I've seen quite a few older people in my city riding around on 3 wheeled bikes, similar to the ones shown here. They offer quite a bit of stability, without making you low to the ground like a recumbent. However, I can't think of how you would get one into a car. Getting a regular bike into a car is hard enough, have you thought about a roof rack? You ...


6

If your car doesn't have a trailer hitch on it, you can have one installed and purchase a "trike and bike" rack that mounts in the trailer hitch receiver: Hitch Rider Trike-N-Bike™ hitch mounted racks transport a trike and bike at the same time. Wheel holder and bike support arm styles are available for the bike carrier position. The rack fits both 1 ...


6

Your best bet is probably a recumbent trike. Of course this does bring up the transportation issue. You could look at getting a roof rack or rear platform for the car which could negate the transportation issue. Another thought would be a tandem. If you can balance enough to keep you both up and she can manage not to fall off. Again this brings up ...


6

Check out the Hase Pino. Tandem Bike, but built to let a recumbent rider get a full view from the front, without having to steer or balance, while the captain can sit upright with the same awesome view. There's accessories for seatbelts or handcranks, if that's your thing. Also, the newest models fold in the middle, so they can fit in a trunk. On the other ...


6

As for the vehicle most buyers need only consider the size of hitch they have, 1 1/4" or 2" are the typical sizes and try to get a hitch of the same size. You can usually get an adapter to fit a rack that is sized differently than the hitch. Typically the hitch racks sit a bit back off the rear of your car to accommodate rear features of most vehicles. I'd ...


5

Where I live it is common for commercial operator to purpose build trailers for carrying bikes such as these. The other option I have seen is custom bike racks for back of any flatdeck trailer or trucks. One event here has over 1000 entrants to a relay - they need to transport 1500 bikes on the day, up to 100km..... So it's certainly doable.... I am glad ...


5

Being both a hatchback owner and a trunk rack owner, I can tell you yes...and no. I've got a Saris Bones 3 rack and the feet have etched the window slightly. While the feet are of a more rubbery plastic, I think it's when there's dirt and grit underneath and moves (even unnoticeable movement) it grinds at the window. It usually cleans up pretty well, but I ...


4

Sharing own experience with several racks, either used as bought and even homemade. I can divide them in three categories: Roof Trailer Hitch Trunk/Reardoor. Roof: More adequate for small cars (i.e. not so tall) for reach issues. Also, they work better with lighter bikes (Road bikes, XC bikes or the like). I wouldn't fit a heavy DH bike in a roof rack, ...


4

Mainly it doesn't matter. Usually two bikes are front-first (because it "just seems right"), but once you go beyond two bikes the directions alternate. True, if you don't have the bike properly fastened then, on a fork-mount carrier, it can blow loose a hair easier in the reverse orientation, but it can also come loose going around a curve or going over a ...


4

Greenspeed both makes folding tadpole recumbent trikes, which can fit in the back of a reasonably sized car.


3

I don't think there will be a clear roof vs. trunk recommendation as both systems have their pros and cons: Roof Pro Does not cover the trunk lid (access to the trunk when fully loaded) Bikes stay cleaner (Especially when raining - on the trunk, the rear of the car sucks up road grim which gets into the bikes moving parts) Con You have to lift the ...


3

Considered looking for a Reese hitch instead: E-trailer hitch for Mazda 3. It would offer a cleaner look to the car, be easier to load and unload bikes, and won't damage the car's finish.


3

If it sticks out from the with of the car DO NOT carry the bike in the bumper carrier, if necessary, take both wheels out but take no chances, anything wider than the car is a danger to yourself and others, think about motorbikes.


3

I've had good luck strapping my TerraTrike to the top of a Matrix. We have a roof rack, which makes it easier. But before that I just fed the straps through the doors. The trickiest part is that at highway speeds, there's a lot of stuff that can fly off. (I lost a fender that way.) So my procedure is Put the seat back as far down as possible, to ...


3

Firstly I've seen a variety of trikes on the roof of a fairly wide variety of cars - hmm, I've carried one on the roof of mine along with two recumbent bikes, so its perfectly possible to carry a trike on a car. The challenge - as it has always been with recumbents - is that you may not be able to do so with a single standard piece of kit. From memory wheels ...


3

Trident, Mantis and Artifice by TW Bents all fold enough to go in a car (allegedly, I don't have one) You can get them from Buy Buy Bicycles in the UK.


3

You really should read Shelton Brown's site: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/ He was a great resource for the bike community (RIP) and you have some common threads with him. He talks about tandeming, which would be an option for you. A note on the bike having to fit in the car, it is possible to get racks for the tandem, it doesn't have to be transported in ...


3

There is the Azub Eco [recumbent tadpole] Trike. However, if you watch the video of the folding, it's no Brompton.


3

I found a long list here (I don't know how good or recent it is, but it is quite long, and pan-national): Where to Find A Four-Wheeled Bike or Tricycle. The various sellers might tell you whether/how it's possible to transport them by car. There are also second-level links, for example one of the links is to http://www.roman-road.co.uk/ which then links to ...


2

Check out the Di Blasi folding tricycles. I don't have any experience with them but their fold look as cool as the Brompton fold. http://www.diblasi.co.uk/Folding_Tricycles.asp?Prd=Tricycles&Pag=Gruppo&Lng=en


2

Yes, yes it is possible... If the tandem is loaded onto the carrier at an angle, it won't extend much beyond the width of the car or minivan (maybe not at all for a larger vehicle). It's not totally clear in the following picture, but the horizontal bars are tilted up a bit to make it more secure. It's necessary to bungee-cord the bike or otherwise ...


2

If cannot fit the bike in you have four options: Remove the front wheel and lower seat, this makes the bike much smaller. This is the no cost, no change to car and medium effort to get wheel off and on and get bike in and out of car. Mount a roof rack and use a carrier. This is a medium cost, semi permanent (roof rack can be removed) and medium effort to ...


2

None of the other answers deal with the OPs desire to keep the bike inside the car, i.e. not on a rack. To put the bike in the car, you have to take off at least one of the wheels. Pedro sells a "chain keeper" which is designed to keep the chain on or near the derailleur when the rear wheel is off: This should help you considerably (along with old ...


1

This instruction shows it on a window. THRUWAY And I would not assume that any rack with padded bars contact points mounts the same.


1

If you literally mean inside then: If you are going to remove a wheel and lefty makes front difficult. Then remove the rear and place derailleur up and near rear of trunk. Why place the chain in a container - just leave the chain on the bike. You still have dirt to deal with from front wheel but better than grease from derailleur and chain. Get a rubber ...


1

The BMW roof rack system can be found for ~120$ USD, and 140$ USD for the touring bike carrier. Works extremely well.


1

I doubt it is going to work on any rear rack. You may be able to install two roof racks end to end or buy an extra long one for tandems. http://www.rackattack.com/product-pages/thule-558p-tandem-carrier.asp?utm_source=google&utm_medium=product-feed&utm_campaign=google-products&utm_term=100558P&gclid=CKf7rrWemboCFdAWMgodllgADg Additionally, ...


1

With my Atera carriers, fitting the bike 'backwards' means that it can pivot forward on the frame clamp under very heavy braking. I learned this to my cost when using them for the first time, having fitted the two bikes in opposite directions as it seem the right thing to do. Short answer; I always fit facing forward.


1

Also consider when purchasing a car, the size of your boot. Bike racks are great and I have used a generic one that clips to the back of your boot door a number of times, but mainly only for longer journeys where the boot and or seat space is needed. Depending on the size/type of car and amount of people/bikes you are transporting most of the time you can ...



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