Hot answers tagged

41

I've never shipped a bike, but I moved from Canada to Europe with my Surly Cross-check in a box last year. When the box came off the plane it looked like it had been run over by a truck and left out in the rain, but the contents of the box were 100% undamaged. Hold on to your pants, this is gonna be long! Shipping a bike is cheap and easy, but make sure to ...


12

When I drop my wife off at the train station, we use a folding bike and a trailer. She rides the folding bike there, and her suitcase rides in the trailer behind my bike. However, while inexpensive used folding bikes can be found, getting a trailer may be too expensive. You'll either need to carry someone on your bike, or find a way to bring along another ...


8

I have had great success with my local bike shop shipping to another bike shop. You can call around your destination and see what options there are, but this allows you to rebuild the bike easily at your destination without your whole workshop of tools. In addition, your local bike shop will often have the proper packing materials. While I like to tinker on ...


8

Some bike shops will disassemble and pack a bike for shipping. For a fee, of course.


8

Being both a hatchback owner and a trunk rack owner, I can tell you yes...and no. I've got a Saris Bones 3 rack and the feet have etched the window slightly. While the feet are of a more rubbery plastic, I think it's when there's dirt and grit underneath and moves (even unnoticeable movement) it grinds at the window. It usually cleans up pretty well, but I ...


7

I recently flew to Europe with my wife, and we brought along our bicycles. Our solution was to disassemble them the night before and place them into cheap Nashbar bicycle bags. We wrapped pipe insulation foam around just about everything to avoid damage from handling. For extra protection, we then stuffed these into the standard bike boxes provided (at a ...


7

You could try something with slightly less coverage like the sks raceblades. However, the sks commuter fenders have less clearance in the back. It still might be too much though. Clip on fenders like the portland design work soda pop fenders may be an option for you as well, but they provide less coverage overall. Fenders are one of those things that are ...


7

Three ideas: Drive: You get a bike rack on the back of a car and hit the road. Train: I'm told you can put a bike on Amtrak for $10. I don't know if they run that way, but there's probably some train, and it's worth checking if they offer something similar. Well, there's always this: 7 days, 17 hours.


7

This is quite tricky, given a trombone is not a nicely shaped instrument. You can try some larger racks, or mount some plywood or something to a smaller rack to try to get a more stable surface to carry the trombone (or be able to build something that allowed carrying the trombone like a pannier), but I doubt it will be very good, especially with all the ...


6

I checked with YouTube and found this really great video: I followed the instructions in the video and shipped my bike from Vancouver to Frankfurt and it was flawless.


6

As for the vehicle most buyers need only consider the size of hitch they have, 1 1/4" or 2" are the typical sizes and try to get a hitch of the same size. You can usually get an adapter to fit a rack that is sized differently than the hitch. Typically the hitch racks sit a bit back off the rear of your car to accommodate rear features of most vehicles. I'd ...


6

Use a Gig Bag to use as a back pack. Thats what they are there for, and it seems there exist some for trombone with enough extra space for stands and sheets (check before you buy). I use a baritone saxophone gig bag on my bike (this one). While it may look a big oddly proportioned on me (115cm in height; the bag, not me), it works perfectly fine for ...


6

There are a number of options, and this partly depends on how thorough a kit you need to carry with you. (i.e everything for every job, or a typical mechanic's pit kit) The best traveling tool kit I've found is made by B&W International. Their Bike Buddy case is sold either with or without tools included, and is a carry-on friendly, rolling hard ...


6

I'd be very tempted to make a tool roll. You'll need access to a sewing machine that can handle 2-3 layers of canvas, but even most home machines will do that if you're careful (and buy a canvas needle!) You see them mostly today with sets of ring spanners, made of cheap plastic. But in the older days people would generally make them out of canvas, often ...


5

I don't think there will be a clear roof vs. trunk recommendation as both systems have their pros and cons: Roof Pro Does not cover the trunk lid (access to the trunk when fully loaded) Bikes stay cleaner (Especially when raining - on the trunk, the rear of the car sucks up road grim which gets into the bikes moving parts) Con You have to lift the ...


5

The yoke spacing on the BOB Trailer is quite a bit wider then a typical front fork mount bike rack, you could probably modify one with wider spacers and use a trailer skewer (or similar fabricated part) to mount the trailer yoke. The wheel tray will need to be long enough for the span of the trailer and the fork mount will need to be high enough (or the ...


4

Yakima and Thule and probably most other rack companies have top tube adapters. They all recognize the need to accommodate the sloping top tube/y frame/children's bike market. They will all function relatively the same. Unless you have an ultra lightweight delicate carbon frame/seatpost, which I don't believe your bicycle qualifies for that, you should be ...


4

That page actually lays it out pretty well. You have three options: box/bag your bike, pay £30 for a reserved bike space, or pay £22 to ship your bike such that it will arrive within 24 hours of you. The reserved bike spaces and shipping don't require you to box or bag your bike. When I traveled on EuroStar and on French trains, I had a friend handy with a ...


4

I just shipped my bike via REI -- they're willing to ship between any two REI stores if you're a member there. The cost breakdown was: $30 -- disassembly and packing $15 -- shipping charge $60 -- shipping surcharge for an oversize box $6 -- insurance for a $600 bike ($1 insurance for each $100 in declared value) for a total of $111. In addition, I wasn't ...


4

You may want to look into getting something like a Trail Gator which can be used to tow a child's bike behind a standard bike. I don't think that weight would be a problem as most children's bikes are actually Bike Shaped Objects. I think my kids' bike weights more than most road bikes. Might take some adjustments to get the front wheel off the ground on ...


4

What?? No! Hardcase, hardcase, hardcase!!! Your bike is not going to fare well going most of half way around the world in nothing more than a plastic bag. Please believe me. Don't ruin your tour. Some shops rent hard cases. Call around and see what you can find. Ask your friends. Ask local clubs. Look for a new or used one, buy it, and sell it when ...


4

If it sticks out from the with of the car DO NOT carry the bike in the bumper carrier, if necessary, take both wheels out but take no chances, anything wider than the car is a danger to yourself and others, think about motorbikes.


4

None of the other answers deal with the OPs desire to keep the bike inside the car, i.e. not on a rack. To put the bike in the car, you have to take off at least one of the wheels. Pedro sells a "chain keeper" which is designed to keep the chain on or near the derailleur when the rear wheel is off: This should help you considerably (along with old ...


4

First, I'll give you an estimate on the weight of a cardboard box. Then, you can read the side notes at the end of this answer to see why the weight is a relatively irrelevant quantity. EDIT: This link sells a bike box and lists the weight as 7.40 lbs. The rest of this answer gives you a way to estimate this, as well as tells you why this whole problem is ...


4

Most (all?) airliner holds are pressurized and nearly all are heated, at least above freezing if not to cabin temperature, so I wouldn't expect any particular problems. The atmospheric pressure at sea level is around 14.7 psi, so even if the the hold was not pressurized at all, the worst your bike would see would be around 15psi extra pressure in the ...


4

I have flown 6x with my bike (Cyclocross Disc) in a soft padded bike bag and never once had issues with the rotors. Numerous other MTB friends never remove the rotors either and have not had trouble when flying. Echoing the comment by @Daniel, I'd be more focussed on the dropouts and RD and making sure those are supported. You are way more at risk ...


4

Flying with a Brompton is typically dependent on the airport staff and flight crew, rather than airline policies and procedures. I've had success getting the bike on larger planes no problem, mostly because overhead compartments were very large, or because there was sufficient space to store the folded bike (with seat and pedals removed) with strollers and ...


3

Yes, yes it is possible... If the tandem is loaded onto the carrier at an angle, it won't extend much beyond the width of the car or minivan (maybe not at all for a larger vehicle). It's not totally clear in the following picture, but the horizontal bars are tilted up a bit to make it more secure. It's necessary to bungee-cord the bike or otherwise ...


3

Considered looking for a Reese hitch instead: E-trailer hitch for Mazda 3. It would offer a cleaner look to the car, be easier to load and unload bikes, and won't damage the car's finish.


3

Benzo already hit all the high points. IMO, it depends on the weather you get and the amount of coverage you need. I've had quite good luck with the seatpost clip on fender (SKS Xtra-Dry Rear Seatpost Fender). It can be adjusted up or down and moved out of the way if you need to hold the bike vertically. If that arrangement doesn't work for you (buy ...



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