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36

I've never shipped a bike, but I moved from Canada to Europe with my Surly Cross-check in a box last year. When the box came off the plane it looked like it had been run over by a truck and left out in the rain, but the contents of the box were 100% undamaged. Hold on to your pants, this is gonna be long! Shipping a bike is cheap and easy, but make sure to ...


16

Yeah, buy a used bike somewhere, either at a shop that has a bunch, or off or Craig's List or another "want ad" source. And, of course, there are yard sales. If you shop carefully you can probably pick up a serviceable bike for $50-100. But first study bikes a little to learn to recognize quality. Look at the cheap bikes at Walmart and some moderately ...


11

Recycled Cycles (in the University District area) sells used bicycles, I would also checkout seattle.craigslist.org I recommend going into a bike shop that just sells bicycles (Gregg's near Green Lake is great - but many others all around Seattle) and tell them what sort of riding you are planning (commuting, shopping and using the bicycle as ...


9

When I drop my wife off at the train station, we use a folding bike and a trailer. She rides the folding bike there, and her suitcase rides in the trailer behind my bike. However, while inexpensive used folding bikes can be found, getting a trailer may be too expensive. You'll either need to carry someone on your bike, or find a way to bring along another ...


8

I have had great success with my local bike shop shipping to another bike shop. You can call around your destination and see what options there are, but this allows you to rebuild the bike easily at your destination without your whole workshop of tools. In addition, your local bike shop will often have the proper packing materials. While I like to tinker on ...


8

I lack experience with entry-level (walmart, etc.) bikes, so take my answer with this in consideration. I was shopping this month for a good commuter bike to replace my old road bike (more about it below). I don't own a car, so I'll use it 15 miles per day, almost every workday between april and october, as well as for carrying all groceries and various ...


7

You could try something with slightly less coverage like the sks raceblades. However, the sks commuter fenders have less clearance in the back. It still might be too much though. Clip on fenders like the portland design work soda pop fenders may be an option for you as well, but they provide less coverage overall. Fenders are one of those things that are ...


7

I recently flew to Europe with my wife, and we brought along our bicycles. Our solution was to disassemble them the night before and place them into cheap Nashbar bicycle bags. We wrapped pipe insulation foam around just about everything to avoid damage from handling. For extra protection, we then stuffed these into the standard bike boxes provided (at a ...


6

As for the vehicle most buyers need only consider the size of hitch they have, 1 1/4" or 2" are the typical sizes and try to get a hitch of the same size. You can usually get an adapter to fit a rack that is sized differently than the hitch. Typically the hitch racks sit a bit back off the rear of your car to accommodate rear features of most vehicles. I'd ...


6

Three ideas: Drive: You get a bike rack on the back of a car and hit the road. Train: I'm told you can put a bike on Amtrak for $10. I don't know if they run that way, but there's probably some train, and it's worth checking if they offer something similar. Well, there's always this: 7 days, 17 hours.


6

I checked with YouTube and found this really great video: I followed the instructions in the video and shipped my bike from Vancouver to Frankfurt and it was flawless.


4

That page actually lays it out pretty well. You have three options: box/bag your bike, pay £30 for a reserved bike space, or pay £22 to ship your bike such that it will arrive within 24 hours of you. The reserved bike spaces and shipping don't require you to box or bag your bike. When I traveled on EuroStar and on French trains, I had a friend handy with a ...


4

Yakima and Thule and probably most other rack companies have top tube adapters. They all recognize the need to accommodate the sloping top tube/y frame/children's bike market. They will all function relatively the same. Unless you have an ultra lightweight delicate carbon frame/seatpost, which I don't believe your bicycle qualifies for that, you should be ...


4

What?? No! Hardcase, hardcase, hardcase!!! Your bike is not going to fare well going most of half way around the world in nothing more than a plastic bag. Please believe me. Don't ruin your tour. Some shops rent hard cases. Call around and see what you can find. Ask your friends. Ask local clubs. Look for a new or used one, buy it, and sell it when ...


3

Benzo already hit all the high points. IMO, it depends on the weather you get and the amount of coverage you need. I've had quite good luck with the seatpost clip on fender (SKS Xtra-Dry Rear Seatpost Fender). It can be adjusted up or down and moved out of the way if you need to hold the bike vertically. If that arrangement doesn't work for you (buy ...


3

I don't think there will be a clear roof vs. trunk recommendation as both systems have their pros and cons: Roof Pro Does not cover the trunk lid (access to the trunk when fully loaded) Bikes stay cleaner (Especially when raining - on the trunk, the rear of the car sucks up road grim which gets into the bikes moving parts) Con You have to lift the ...


3

Considered looking for a Reese hitch instead: E-trailer hitch for Mazda 3. It would offer a cleaner look to the car, be easier to load and unload bikes, and won't damage the car's finish.


2

You can also purchase an Xtracycle kit (the FreeRadical) to convert your existing frame into a longtail -- these have both passenger seats and footrests available (the latter being not only convenient for your passenger, but necessary in some jurisdictions to make passenger-carrying legal). Having a longtail cargo bike can come in handy for other reasons ...


2

Not only will your local bike shop have quality 'virgin rainforest grade' cardboard boxes going spare they will also have the plastic braces that fit inside the front fork, the plastic plug to fit into the top of the seat tube, the plastic spacers to fit on the rear q/r and the foam 'pipe wrap' tubes that go around the three main triangles. They may even let ...


2

I just shipped my bike via REI -- they're willing to ship between any two REI stores if you're a member there. The cost breakdown was: $30 -- disassembly and packing $15 -- shipping charge $60 -- shipping surcharge for an oversize box $6 -- insurance for a $600 bike ($1 insurance for each $100 in declared value) for a total of $111. In addition, I wasn't ...


2

Yes, yes it is possible... If the tandem is loaded onto the carrier at an angle, it won't extend much beyond the width of the car or minivan (maybe not at all for a larger vehicle). It's not totally clear in the following picture, but the horizontal bars are tilted up a bit to make it more secure. It's necessary to bungee-cord the bike or otherwise ...


1

I doubt it is going to work on any rear rack. You may be able to install two roof racks end to end or buy an extra long one for tandems. http://www.rackattack.com/product-pages/thule-558p-tandem-carrier.asp?utm_source=google&utm_medium=product-feed&utm_campaign=google-products&utm_term=100558P&gclid=CKf7rrWemboCFdAWMgodllgADg Additionally, ...


1

This question may be what you are looking for: How to get a bike from one city to another in the U.S Besides the obvious UPS, USPS, and FedEx, there is train shipping as Daniel suggests. Some bike shops and outdoors stores will pack and ship for you (good if you are not mechanically inclined). Bike shops are a good place to get free bike-sized cardboard ...


1

I had a similar long-range trip. I was a member of a local bike group and asked them if they, as a part of our membership, owned and lent bike luggage to members. They said they didn't have any but that it was a good idea. Maybe other bike clubs around your town might have luggage that you could rent. You might want to try bike shops and see if they have ...


1

Airlines are not going to let you take a full size bike on a plane with the possible exception of a folding bicycle. If you want to transport your bicycle you are going to have to pack it up. Some airlines sell boxes for this purpose. If you don't know how to do it yourself you can always bring it to a LBS and have them do it for you. Rather then take it on ...


1

You may want to look into getting something like a Trail Gator which can be used to tow a child's bike behind a standard bike. I don't think that weight would be a problem as most children's bikes are actually Bike Shaped Objects. I think my kids' bike weights more than most road bikes. Might take some adjustments to get the front wheel off the ground on ...



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