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49

Some important skills for commuters: Looking directly behind you without turning. This is a surprisingly difficult skill to master. When a rider looks directly backwards, it is common to turn in the direction they twisted their head. It takes a lot of practice to make resisting that turning automatic. The importance of looking behind you in traffic should ...


25

How to mount a curb. (kerb?) Start with your bike. With enough skill, you can go up a tall curb without damaging the bike. But as novice, make it easier on yourself. Remove extra weight. Backpack, panniers, etc. Remove lose items. Water bottles come to mind. Flat bars are easier. Fat tires protect your wheels when you make a mistake. Prerequisites It ...


25

Here are my snippets of advice from when I learnt to trackstand: Start off by practising on a slight uphill. This way you only need to practice the forward pressure part of the movement. As you get better you can move on to smaller and smaller slopes. In urban riding, you can often use the camber of the road as your slope. Use the right gear. Not really an ...


14

I was taught how to track stand on a fixed gear bike by some velodrome riders and here are some pointers they gave me that really helped me. Keep your pedals roughly horizontal, and turn your front wheel about 45 degrees towards the side that has the front foot. Most beginners don't do this, they move their wheel left/right in an attempt to stabilize the ...


13

You can't bend over and tie your shoes with 100% safety -- you might throw your back out, you might lose your balance, etc. As to "tricks", one man's "trick" is another man's "ho-umm" -- it depends on your level of skill and physical conditioning. Certainly, hopping a moderate height curb is within the realm of possible (I used to do it on occasion, before ...


9

Try driving around bicyclists Now that you are experienced with biking around cars, you know what drivers often do that you hate. Periodically do some driving around bikes, to stay in touch with what drivers are going through. That will help you anticipate driver's behavior when you're on your bike.


7

According to this site on artisitic cycling they refer to a trick called a "head-tube wheelie" which is probably a good name for it. BMX enthusiasts may have a different name for it, but that's essentially what it is. I was also able to find this other site referring to headtube wheelies. Also, this Youtube video refers to it as a headtube seated wheelie, ...


6

Both basic and advanced things any cyclist should know are covered in Cyclecraft. The best book on road cycling in the world (though remember non-Brits we cycle on the other side of the road!) http://www.cyclecraft.co.uk/ Edit: actually there is a North American edition. http://www.cyclecraft.org/ I am not very happy giving excerpts but I guess the thing ...


6

I see that the definition of a bunny hop is subject to the kind of cycling we're talking about. I doubt you'll find a specific definition that everyone will agree with. However, what's common with (almost) everyone's concept of a bunny hop is that the front wheel elevates first and and the rear follows — just like a bunny hops — front paws first. Whether ...


5

Is it conceivable that you could practice this and be proficient enough that you would rarely crash, if ever, when bunnyhopping up a curb? Absolutely! I'm sure Danny Mcaskill could do this all day long. ...


5

Learn to use your ears. I found that my ears were one of my most valuable assests when riding in traffic. Being able to tell what is going on around you without having to constantly turn your head to look just means you are more aware and therefore safer.


4

I'm not a lawyer, I'm certainly not your lawyer and I don't know the laws in your city. That said, my advice is that you shouldn't try to hop on the curb/sidewalk at high speed. In my city there is an ordinance against riding recklessly on sidewalks. Whether or not "doing tricks" while commuting is actually reckless, I believe that a police officer could ...


4

I learned how to track stand in a very similar fashion to Victor's posting with fixed gear bicycles. However learning to track stand on a freewheel bike can present a different set of problems than on a fixed gear bicycle. This does not necessarily mean it is harder though. The placement of your pedals in relation to your wheels is the same, but with the ...


3

Since you are new to BMX I would find a good local shop that specializes in BMX. In my area the three largest conventional road/MTB shops don't carry BMX. We do have two very good shops that only sell BMX and skateboards. So don't be dismayed if the first shop you check has nothing you want. If you can't find one, stop by the local skate/bike park and see ...


3

Start by finding some imperfection in the surface - like just a tiny bit of a dip or lump. Roll your front wheel up to the point by pushing very slightly on the pedals and then once you feel the resistance from point to your movement ease off on the pedals and roll back. Keep doing this and you will find that you can balance on the point with only the very ...


2

on youtube you will find quite a few video tutorials on how to do a track stand Here is an example:


2

A few pointers: On most roads the crown of the road (center) is uphill for water drainage, so turn your front wheel towards the center to give your forward pedal stroke some natural resitance. Take your hands off the brake levers once you achieve your initial balance. You will maintain position by varying a slight pedal pressure against (a) any natural ...


2

Check with your local cycling advocacy group, they often have bike-handling classes, which tend to teach both techniques and give you some insight to the law in your area. As you mentioned you're from Boston, I recommend checking out MassBike's classes.


2

No, it's not possible. Crash happens. Nothing is ever 100%, especially when talking about moving objects surrounded by elements that are not completely under your control. Is that a small pebble at exactly the wrong spot causing your bead to be pushed in just enough that you get a blowout when you are expecting instead a nice grippy tire landing? Ouch, it ...


2

You want a very low stand over height, short chainstays, steep headangle, and little to no suspension. If you still want to use it for general mountain biking stuff, then look at street or dirt jump bikes, rather than trials.


2

Pulling a wheelie and holding it - isn't that just a wheelie? Unless you have stopped peddling, and then it becomes a 'manual' or 'manny'. Manual: Wheelie: ...


2

Balancing on your back wheel (front wheel in the air) while peddling is called a catwalk. (Sorry about the wikihow link, it was the only source I found other than youtube)


2

The bmx name for the trick would probably be a pedaling death truck. A normal death truck is that same position, but with the feet on the back pegs. As you can imagine, that would leave you fairly stretched out and it'd be a nasty position to bail from.


2

The answer is yes - it is possible and worthwhile to be able to jump curbs. My reasons are: As a daily commuter we are often called upon (or forced) to do emergency maneuvers. If one has never planned for these things then crashing is your (forced) option. However if you are able to avoid the accident by having a skill you know you have - you may have just ...


1

Flatland frames generally have shorter top tubes, steeper head tube angles, shorter rear ends, etc... The down tube in your picture is designed to give you more room for front wheel scuffing. I'm noticing more and more flatland frames are designed to look like a typical street/park frame, but the geometry is not the same. I believe there are hybrid frames in ...


1

A bunny-hop is a skill that all cyclists should learn. It's not really a trick, IMO. You don't have to be MacAskill-good, but being able to get over a curb (or curb-like object) is handy.


1

I rode BMX professionally (1998 x-games) but my specialty was "Street" as in jumping curbs, sliding rails, wall rides, something like you want to do. My favorite place to ride is in San Francisco. It has so much to ride and lots and lots of curb cuts dropping down into the streets. Not one day of riding ever goes by where I felt that I was 100% safe. I come ...


1

You could get some knee, elbow pads, a back protector and of course gloves and a helmet should be mandatory, so you'll be less likely to injure yourself when you do fall off. Find a smaller curb and work your way up to 20cm. Remember to throw you body weight back whilst you pop your front wheel up, and then forwards whilst you lift your back wheel.


1

If "tricks" could be done with 100% safety, then they wouldn't be tricks would they? So, I'm going to answer your last question... Is it possible/worthwhile to learn the jumping technique and become good enough to do it all the time, without having to slow down, without the fear of a crash? Yes, this is very much possible and extremely worthwhile. ...


1

Look into car's side-mirrors Very simple advice, but that it takes time to master. Gazing into parked cars mirrors will give you a warning sign of a possible open door or car that will incorporate into the traffic flow: no person reflected, great! You should be able of doing this quickly and from the reflection decide what to do: it is common that drivers ...



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