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54

Some important skills for commuters: Looking directly behind you without turning. This is a surprisingly difficult skill to master. When a rider looks directly backwards, it is common to turn in the direction they twisted their head. It takes a lot of practice to make resisting that turning automatic. The importance of looking behind you in traffic should ...


30

Here are my snippets of advice from when I learnt to trackstand: Start off by practising on a slight uphill. This way you only need to practice the forward pressure part of the movement. As you get better you can move on to smaller and smaller slopes. In urban riding, you can often use the camber of the road as your slope. Use the right gear. Not really an ...


27

How to mount a curb. (kerb?) Start with your bike. With enough skill, you can go up a tall curb without damaging the bike. But as novice, make it easier on yourself. Remove extra weight. Backpack, panniers, etc. Remove lose items. Water bottles come to mind. Flat bars are easier. Fat tires protect your wheels when you make a mistake. Prerequisites It ...


19

I was taught how to track stand on a fixed gear bike by some velodrome riders and here are some pointers they gave me that really helped me. Keep your pedals roughly horizontal, and turn your front wheel about 45 degrees towards the side that has the front foot. Most beginners don't do this, they move their wheel left/right in an attempt to stabilize the ...


15

You can't bend over and tie your shoes with 100% safety -- you might throw your back out, you might lose your balance, etc. As to "tricks", one man's "trick" is another man's "ho-umm" -- it depends on your level of skill and physical conditioning. Certainly, hopping a moderate height curb is within the realm of possible (I used to do it on occasion, before ...


11

Try driving around bicyclists Now that you are experienced with biking around cars, you know what drivers often do that you hate. Periodically do some driving around bikes, to stay in touch with what drivers are going through. That will help you anticipate driver's behavior when you're on your bike.


9

Step 1: Get used to bailing out. Put your bike in first gear. Ride very slowly, then give a (small but sharp) upwards jerk on the bars as you do a hard downstroke on one of the pedals. Stay seated. You should have the power to pass the "tipping point". When you do, put your feet down so you don't fall on your butt. Do this until it feels completely ...


7

Both basic and advanced things any cyclist should know are covered in Cyclecraft. The best book on road cycling in the world (though remember non-Brits we cycle on the other side of the road!) http://www.cyclecraft.co.uk/ Edit: actually there is a North American edition. http://www.cyclecraft.org/ I am not very happy giving excerpts but I guess the thing ...


7

Is it conceivable that you could practice this and be proficient enough that you would rarely crash, if ever, when bunnyhopping up a curb? Absolutely! I'm sure Danny Mcaskill could do this all day long. In my experience, however, I have a hard time bunnyhopping a road bike, especially with the seat positioned 'properly.' ...


7

According to this site on artisitic cycling they refer to a trick called a "head-tube wheelie" which is probably a good name for it. BMX enthusiasts may have a different name for it, but that's essentially what it is. I was also able to find this other site referring to headtube wheelies. Also, this Youtube video refers to it as a headtube seated wheelie, ...


7

I see that the definition of a bunny hop is subject to the kind of cycling we're talking about. I doubt you'll find a specific definition that everyone will agree with. However, what's common with (almost) everyone's concept of a bunny hop is that the front wheel elevates first and and the rear follows — just like a bunny hops — front paws first. Whether ...


6

Learn to use your ears. I found that my ears were one of my most valuable assests when riding in traffic. Being able to tell what is going on around you without having to constantly turn your head to look just means you are more aware and therefore safer.


6

It's a trick -- it looks good on camera and would count for points accordant with degree-of-difficulty and "sticking the landing" at an adjudicated comp. The bike and rider become effectively parallel with their upright-riding stance; as opposed to perpendicular when in contact with the ground. It's also a marketing cliche in biking. Like an "ollie" or a "...


5

A few pointers: On most roads the crown of the road (center) is uphill for water drainage, so turn your front wheel towards the center to give your forward pedal stroke some natural resitance. Take your hands off the brake levers once you achieve your initial balance. You will maintain position by varying a slight pedal pressure against (a) any natural ...


5

I learned how to track stand in a very similar fashion to Victor's posting with fixed gear bicycles. However learning to track stand on a freewheel bike can present a different set of problems than on a fixed gear bicycle. This does not necessarily mean it is harder though. The placement of your pedals in relation to your wheels is the same, but with the ...


5

I use two different strategies for the short and long absences. visiting a city by foot When I'll be away from the bike for a long time I take the valuable stuff (cash, id, small tool kit, phone, charger, camera) and leave everything else. If I'm in a formal camping area or in a secluded location I'll leave the tent pitched and my sleeping bag and ...


5

Its definitely not for stability, its a trick called "Table top". The flatter they look in the air the higher score.


4

Track Standing (thanks to @zingdon for what its called) What I practice repeatedly at all traffic lights is balancing without putting your feet on the ground. It improves balance which can prevent a crash if you ever get knocked slightly e.g. clipped by a wing mirror or hit an unsuspected pot-hole. For learning: brake until you come to a standstill ...


4

I'm not a lawyer, I'm certainly not your lawyer and I don't know the laws in your city. That said, my advice is that you shouldn't try to hop on the curb/sidewalk at high speed. In my city there is an ordinance against riding recklessly on sidewalks. Whether or not "doing tricks" while commuting is actually reckless, I believe that a police officer could ...


4

I doubt you will find any way of making the bike secure enough to leave alone for hours on end. Perhaps you could somehow fit solid motorbike panniers, but they would be awfully heavy and inconvenient when you do have to remove them. When buying groceries you basically have the choice of taking the bags with you or leaving them on the bike. What I do ...


4

Wheelies aren't a strength thing, they are a function of weight distribution on the bike. If you move your weight far enough back the front wheel will lift - this can initially be assisted by applying a few hard pedal strokes in a light gear. As you correctly observed, rear suspension is a disadvantage here, as it absorbs some of your initial weight ...


3

Since you are new to BMX I would find a good local shop that specializes in BMX. In my area the three largest conventional road/MTB shops don't carry BMX. We do have two very good shops that only sell BMX and skateboards. So don't be dismayed if the first shop you check has nothing you want. If you can't find one, stop by the local skate/bike park and see ...


3

The answer is yes - it is possible and worthwhile to be able to jump curbs. My reasons are: As a daily commuter we are often called upon (or forced) to do emergency maneuvers. If one has never planned for these things then crashing is your (forced) option. However if you are able to avoid the accident by having a skill you know you have - you may have just ...


3

on youtube you will find quite a few video tutorials on how to do a track stand Here is an example:


3

Start by finding some imperfection in the surface - like just a tiny bit of a dip or lump. Roll your front wheel up to the point by pushing very slightly on the pedals and then once you feel the resistance from point to your movement ease off on the pedals and roll back. Keep doing this and you will find that you can balance on the point with only the very ...


3

You want a very low stand over height, short chainstays, steep headangle, and little to no suspension. If you still want to use it for general mountain biking stuff, then look at street or dirt jump bikes, rather than trials.


3

Pulling a wheelie and holding it - isn't that just a wheelie? Unless you have stopped peddling, and then it becomes a 'manual' or 'manny'. Manual: Wheelie:


3

Orbital is the brand name of the hub. 15mm and 20mm are different axle diameters, get the one that matches your fork. Edit: Most dirt jumping, DH and freeride forks use 20mm, 15mm is a newer standard used mostly for cross country.


3

As far as I'm aware, it's all about the rider's location vs. that of the rear wheel. A short chain stay helps, because it tucks the rear wheel up closer under your center of gravity. What really makes a big difference is the tilt of the handlebars: When the handlebars are rocked backwards, it lets you get your center of gravity way back past the rear wheel,...


3

Practice, practice, practice. Start moving forward slowly in a low gear and then pop the front wheel off the ground by suddenly pushing a pedal forward and pulling up on the handlebars at the same time, and just keep pedaling while trying to balance on one wheel. If you accelerate to a point where you cannot pedal fast enough to maintain balance on one ...



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