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7

If you ignore the strength in the tire walls (pretty much zero for bike tires) then the pressure (which = force / area ) multiplied by the contact area of the tire on the road must be the force you are putting on the road (ie. the weight of you and the bike). So for a large tire contact patch you need a lower pressure to support your weight, for a small ...


6

Have been looking around and found this site. Has a lot of good information. Talks about: type of riding and what configuration works best sizing big/small wheels (20"/24"/26"/28"/36" typically for adults) width of tires (2.5" - 3") crank arms (4" - 6" in .5" increments) seats where to buy So for me for "all purpose riding" I would need: 24" unicycle ...


6

Probably the most important point is that it should be dirt cheap. Particularly if you're like me and try it briefly, find that it's uncomfortable when you have to involuntarily dismount and never reassemble it after a move. Other than that, large wheeled unicycles are apparently easier to learn on. They are also faster (assuming ungeared), but not as ...


6

I suppose one could legitimately ask how "practical" a unicycle is, since only a very small number of people can be said to have actually mastered riding the things.... However, I have seen folks with amazing skill, and even off-road unicycles equipped with knobby tires...The riders negotiating rocks, logs, and typical off-road obstacles. So...Rider skill ...


5

A unicycle is almost the ultimate cross-mode transport system. I mix it with our trains and buses without restrictions (we have public transport policy that separates unis from bikes). I commonly put it in the back of the car when I go somewhere with my wife that is not parking friendly. I can carry the thing through shops and malls without any issues. It is ...


5

Basically: weight/psi = square inches. Has to be combined weight of rider and cycle. And it's approximate. And much easier with a unicyle: with a bicycle you need to know weight distribution, which can change during a ride. Minor things that make it only an estimate: Compression from weight increases psi, making contact patch smaller than estimate. ...


5

If you are an adult, I would say that you will be more comfortable using a 24 or 26" wheel versus the 20" wheel which is mainly for trick riding. Especially if you want to commute a bit the larger wheel will come in handy. Once you are comfortable on a 24 or 26" wheel, you may want to graduate to a Coker or big wheel cycle for getting around fast (I can ...


4

I would think that riding the intended type of trails on a mountain bike would make you better at mountain biking. The following is a subjective argument based on my personal opinion. I'm sure some people will disagree with me. Here is my argument: Riding a unicycle will improve your coordinate and balance, sure, and are great for those two things. ...


2

Unicycling is such a niche thing that I doubt you're going to get much in the way of scientific results saying any improvement in riding skills, but I'll give it a shot. Since there are such things as mountain unicycles, you can certainly improve your skills! Balance, cornering, and trail sense (knowing what to do on what terrain) are common skills no ...


1

spending a couple of months to learn riding such a thing ... The average person can learn to ride it in just 4-16 hours. It's a super fun and possibly mind expanding activity but it didn't improve me as a bicycle rider (bmx or mtb).


1

I have a few different answers for the first question, if you have a larger budget than I would say you should buy a nimbus unicycle, you should try to aim for around 20 inches, but a bit higher or lower is not that bad. The next option is what I would pick is the torker cx line, these are good sturdy cheap models, but without a doubt I would get a new seat ...



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