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11

You've got two things going against you: Height: I'd suggest avoiding 700c wheels and going for 650b (pricer) or 26" wheels. For short riders (I'd say shorter than 5'5"), these provide better fit. Surly, for example, only makes their small bikes with 26" wheels. Weight: You're going to have to check each manufacturer's weight limit. Generally, hybrids and ...


8

I took the bike to another bike shop. The man there adjusted my handle bar (apparently when I did it myself, it was not good enough, not straight or aligned). Then he put the bike on a stand and checked gear shifting to all the gears. It all worked fine. He also pointed out the slight rattling noise I heard is caused by the chain rubbing against the ...


7

Your height might be more challenging to fit than your weight; your weight is well within tolerance for most bikes, steel or aluminum. Don't buy a too-big bike; it'll make you unhappy and might even cause injury. Especially at first while you're still getting used to cycling, you will likely be more comfortable with a fairly upright position in the saddle. ...


5

It really depends on your budget. Shimano 105 is quite a bit better than Claris. Claris uses an 8 speed cassette while 105 uses an 11 speed cassette. This means that 105 will have smaller gaps between the gears if both bikes have the same gear range. There are 2 levels between Claris and 105. They are Sora (9 speed cassette ) and Tiagra (10 speed ...


4

In general, it is a good idea to bring a bike bought online to a shop for a once-over check. What your local bike shop said is exactly what many other shops will/would say. Not that the bike wasn't put together properly, but it should probably be double checked to make that it assembled correctly AND that nothing wiggled loose during shipping. It's a small ...


4

Wow This question has provoked some impassioned debate, all in the time it took for my morning ride. Take a step back for a moment. Let's say that you get what you pay for. While not always true, let's go with that for a moment. The guy charging 50 quid is saying a bike service from me is worth 50 quid. Is a bike service worth 50 quid to you? Apparently ...


4

My mother was a similar build before she lost a lot of weight. She is the expert I turned to in order to answer the question... in her opinion a women's Electra Townie, 7 speed with 24 inch wheels is "Great for stability and the size is perfect for a 5"2' frame." She owns one, and rides often. Good luck.


3

My advice: Buy a used rigid frame commuter bike on criagslist & turn around & sell this one for $80. If you are intent on working on your current bike, try: Have your wheels professionally "trued"at a good local bike shop. They should be able to tell you if the wheel is too misshapen to be trued well. Replace your tires with something like a 26" ...


3

This is what we call a BSO (Bicycle Shaped Object) -- everything on that is as cheap as possible, which makes sinking even modest upgrades into it not really worth it. For upgrading and tweaking, you'd be much better off starting with an old (but decent quality) bike. You'll likely come out monetarily ahead, and have better quality parts to make it easier to ...


3

I've never used Claris, but I've used a bunch of different Shimano road stuff, from 8 to 11 speed, as well as some SRAM. All other things being equal (which they never are), the more expensive Shimano groupset shifts smoother than the less expensive one. That, however, is splitting some really fine hairs. The shifting performance for modern brifters is nice ...


3

I am worried that "brifters" for $50-$60 is low and that you'd be getting some garbage for that price. ($200 for decent brifters seems the norm) A new wheelset adds $300 - $400? $100 for the fork $100 more for incidentals brings us to ~$800 for a bike you'd be happy with (plus what you spent on the bike already). I tend to vote for keeping nice frames ...


2

I upgraded my road bike from Tiagra to 105 a couple of years ago and noticed a difference, so I imagine you would notice a larger difference between Claris and 105. Crisper shifting in the 105. 105 is worth the $ in my opinion. Frame material is a rider preference. Some are biased against carbon because failure mode is catastrophic. Carbon frames have ...


2

Don't let them con you into spending more money that you need to. You already have a good bike that fits you, just upgrade the shifters and you'll be all set.


2

I'm researching my new road bike too. Here's info on shimano road sets, originally from: http://www.chainreactionhub.com/road/980-our-guide-to-shimanos-road-groupsets-from-tiagra-to-dura-ace with some additional comments by me. Common: All of these have shifter mechanisms in the brakes, so they're "brifters" Nothing road-based has thumb shifters like a ...


2

It really depends on how much your budget is. Usually tires with lower rolling resistance comes a bit, if not alot, more expensive. Sk if you are just going for a pair that's cheap. I think it's best if you go for a 700x30. Since this one has the least amount of tire against the road. I'm also trying to figure out why you don't want to invest in another set ...


1

The best time to get a new bike will vary somewhat due to your region's climate and population density. Bike shops in warmer areas and very large cities are going to sell bikes for sticker price pretty much year round. In regions with a cooler off-season, there will likely be bike shops selling bikes at a discounted price, since they don't move as much stock ...


1

Having upgraded from Claris to 105, I found the 105 to be significantly smoother and more precise and also opens up significantly more cassette options. As a matter of personal preference, I use Ultegra cassettes for even smoother shifting than 105 cassettes on both my 105 (gravel grinder- aluminum frame/carbon fork/ carbon bars) and Dura Ace (road- all ...


1

I've used both 105 5800 and Claris 2300, and while 105 5800 is much better, I think the biggest advantage of 5800 is "upgradability", aka being 11 speed, since you can always upgrade your bikes by purchasing some parts from Dura-Ace 9000, Ultegra 6800, ones from Sram (or even campagnolo if inclined). Of course Shimano will move to 12 speed or higher ...


1

For < $1000 you could get an a much newer bike (< 5 years old) full carbon with brifters and nice wheels. As @mcgyver5 stated, your upgrades on the 1220 will amount to the same money anyway.



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